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Re: Microfiber Chair Covering

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  • Robert
    Maybe not ruin it, but you would likely need to cover the back of the chair near your head with some soft cloth. I had a leather sofa to sit on for listening
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 22, 2012
      Maybe not ruin it, but you would likely
      need to cover the back of the chair near your
      head with some soft cloth.
      I had a leather sofa to sit on for listening
      at some point, and I found right away that I
      needed to put a quilt on the back, what I was leaning
      against(even though the back did not come up to the level of
      my ears).
      Otherwise the sound was really not very good.
      Things close to your head make a big difference.
      REG

      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Michael Gillman <mwgillman@...> wrote:
      >
      > Sometimes I think we obsess much too much. If you like the chair enjoy it.
      > I don't think it will ruin your listening experience.
      >
      > Mike
      >
      >
      > On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 5:56 PM, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > I was looking at a new stuffed chair that I liked for my listening room
      > > but it was covered in microfiber. There were swatches of
      > > different colors I could choose and I could see that microfiber was not
      > > porous. I even tried blowing on a swatch but no air came
      > > through. I did find a research article on the web about the acoustic
      > > absorption properties of microfiber that indicated it was
      > > pretty good for use in curtains and office dividers, but I think the
      > > application was as a sound barrier. I also found a thread on a
      > > pro-audio forum where someone wanted to cover his acoustic panels in
      > > microfiber to prevent the fiberglass insulation from dispersing
      > > into the room. The consensus was not to do it.
      > >
      > > Anyone have experience with microfiber covered chairs?
      > >
      > > Last year I bought a stuffed cloth-covered chair that I thought was
      > > perfect, only to discover I was getting a reflection off the
      > > ends of the armrests when I took a measurement (the upper frequency
      > > response was squiggly and the step response looked like I had an
      > > extra tweeter.) The ends of the armrests were the only place on the chair
      > > that lacked stuffing. I couldn't return it because it
      > > was a special order.
      > >
      > > Tip
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Fred
      Can t help but wonder how reflective your arms and hands may be. Assuming the chair will be used, where would you place your arms if not on the arm
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 23, 2012
        Can't help but wonder how reflective your arms and hands may be.
        Assuming the chair will be used, where would you place your arms if not on the arm rests......??
        But perhaps you could cut them off (the arm rests I mean).

        A comfy covering of non porus Microfiber would surely be suitable if anti-static and resistant to leakage
        e.g. on occasions of great mirth.

        ;-)

        Fred.



        From: Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@...>
        To: regsaudioforum <regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Friday, 23 November 2012, 1:56
        Subject: [regsaudioforum] Microfiber Chair Covering

         
        I was looking at a new stuffed chair that I liked for my listening room but it was covered in microfiber. There were swatches of
        different colors I could choose and I could see that microfiber was not porous. I even tried blowing on a swatch but no air came
        through. I did find a research article on the web about the acoustic absorption properties of microfiber that indicated it was
        pretty good for use in curtains and office dividers, but I think the application was as a sound barrier. I also found a thread on a
        pro-audio forum where someone wanted to cover his acoustic panels in microfiber to prevent the fiberglass insulation from dispersing
        into the room. The consensus was not to do it.

        Anyone have experience with microfiber covered chairs?

        Last year I bought a stuffed cloth-covered chair that I thought was perfect, only to discover I was getting a reflection off the
        ends of the armrests when I took a measurement (the upper frequency response was squiggly and the step response looked like I had an
        extra tweeter.) The ends of the armrests were the only place on the chair that lacked stuffing. I couldn't return it because it
        was a special order.

        Tip



      • HM
        Hi Tip If I hold a microfibre cloth over my ear and perceive a difference, the missing parts are either absorbed or reflected. What I hear through is the part
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 23, 2012
          Hi Tip
          If I hold a microfibre cloth over my ear and perceive a difference, the missing parts are either absorbed or reflected.
          What I hear through is the part that passes the cloth. To my ears our household microfibre cloth behaves like other textile structure of identic thickness.
          I conclude from an electrete microphones membrane behaviour that below resonance frequency it moves and above it turns stiff, so a leather sofa will reflect the frequencies above eigentones frequency while the lower f are passing (with losses).
          As for covering a seat I would believe that the cushion material below matters too.
          In theatre and concert hall design only the empty chairs count in absorption calculation for determining cushion and surface material, as soon as people sit in them the calculation turns human, independent from the chair material.
          I had the armrest reflection too, female vocals were affected, I be wrapped towels around the armrests.
          BR HM


          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@...> wrote:
          >
          > I was looking at a new stuffed chair that I liked for my listening room but it was covered in microfiber. There were swatches of
          > different colors I could choose and I could see that microfiber was not porous. I even tried blowing on a swatch but no air came
          > through. I did find a research article on the web about the acoustic absorption properties of microfiber that indicated it was
          > pretty good for use in curtains and office dividers, but I think the application was as a sound barrier. I also found a thread on a
          > pro-audio forum where someone wanted to cover his acoustic panels in microfiber to prevent the fiberglass insulation from dispersing
          > into the room. The consensus was not to do it.
          >
          > Anyone have experience with microfiber covered chairs?
          >
          > Last year I bought a stuffed cloth-covered chair that I thought was perfect, only to discover I was getting a reflection off the
          > ends of the armrests when I took a measurement (the upper frequency response was squiggly and the step response looked like I had an
          > extra tweeter.) The ends of the armrests were the only place on the chair that lacked stuffing. I couldn't return it because it
          > was a special order.
          >
          > Tip
          >
        • barnet.feingold
          I ve always made certain that furniture used for serious listening has a relatively low back. In my experience, material near my ears, regardless how
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 23, 2012
            I've always made certain that furniture used for serious listening has a relatively low back. In my experience, material near my ears, regardless how absorbent, affects what I hear.

            Barney

            --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@...> wrote:
            >
            > Maybe not ruin it, but you would likely
            > need to cover the back of the chair near your
            > head with some soft cloth.
            > I had a leather sofa to sit on for listening
            > at some point, and I found right away that I
            > needed to put a quilt on the back, what I was leaning
            > against(even though the back did not come up to the level of
            > my ears).
            > Otherwise the sound was really not very good.
            > Things close to your head make a big difference.
            > REG
            >
            > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Michael Gillman <mwgillman@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Sometimes I think we obsess much too much. If you like the chair enjoy it.
            > > I don't think it will ruin your listening experience.
            > >
            > > Mike
            > >
            > >
            > > On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 5:56 PM, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
            > >
            > > > **
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > I was looking at a new stuffed chair that I liked for my listening room
            > > > but it was covered in microfiber. There were swatches of
            > > > different colors I could choose and I could see that microfiber was not
            > > > porous. I even tried blowing on a swatch but no air came
            > > > through. I did find a research article on the web about the acoustic
            > > > absorption properties of microfiber that indicated it was
            > > > pretty good for use in curtains and office dividers, but I think the
            > > > application was as a sound barrier. I also found a thread on a
            > > > pro-audio forum where someone wanted to cover his acoustic panels in
            > > > microfiber to prevent the fiberglass insulation from dispersing
            > > > into the room. The consensus was not to do it.
            > > >
            > > > Anyone have experience with microfiber covered chairs?
            > > >
            > > > Last year I bought a stuffed cloth-covered chair that I thought was
            > > > perfect, only to discover I was getting a reflection off the
            > > > ends of the armrests when I took a measurement (the upper frequency
            > > > response was squiggly and the step response looked like I had an
            > > > extra tweeter.) The ends of the armrests were the only place on the chair
            > > > that lacked stuffing. I couldn't return it because it
            > > > was a special order.
            > > >
            > > > Tip
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Robert
            In practice, I surely agree with this about not having anything close to your ears. I sit on a thing with no back at all! Of course not everyone wants to do
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 23, 2012
              In practice, I surely agree with this about
              not having anything close to your ears. I sit
              on a thing with no back at all! Of course
              not everyone wants to do such a thing, sit
              under their own power alone, as it were.

              It is interesting to think for a moment
              about why such things are necessary or even
              relevant. The answer it seems to me
              is that in stereo listening one is trying to
              hear another acoustic venue than the one of one's own
              room, with not really enough cues to make
              that listening into the other venue as stable
              and effective as if one were really there. One
              is struggling to hear an impression that would
              be automatic in live experience.

              So one wants to have aa little (early)reflected
              sound as reasonable. In an auditorum, at a live event,
              one is immersed in the acoustic venue itself already and if one
              sits with something close to your ears, then
              this is interpreted as just that, something close
              to your ears in the acoustic venue that you are already
              hearing--because it is really there. It is not interpreted
              as the venue itself changing.

              Even so, it is not a good idea to have a concert
              hall seat that comes up behind your head. This changes
              the sound for the worse. And of course
              concert halls do not, though arguably that is because
              the person behind would have blocked view (visually).

              REG


              --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "barnet.feingold" <barnet.feingold@...> wrote:
              >
              > I've always made certain that furniture used for serious listening has a relatively low back. In my experience, material near my ears, regardless how absorbent, affects what I hear.
              >
              > Barney
              >
              > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regtas43@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Maybe not ruin it, but you would likely
              > > need to cover the back of the chair near your
              > > head with some soft cloth.
              > > I had a leather sofa to sit on for listening
              > > at some point, and I found right away that I
              > > needed to put a quilt on the back, what I was leaning
              > > against(even though the back did not come up to the level of
              > > my ears).
              > > Otherwise the sound was really not very good.
              > > Things close to your head make a big difference.
              > > REG
              > >
              > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Michael Gillman <mwgillman@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Sometimes I think we obsess much too much. If you like the chair enjoy it.
              > > > I don't think it will ruin your listening experience.
              > > >
              > > > Mike
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > On Thu, Nov 22, 2012 at 5:56 PM, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > > **
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > I was looking at a new stuffed chair that I liked for my listening room
              > > > > but it was covered in microfiber. There were swatches of
              > > > > different colors I could choose and I could see that microfiber was not
              > > > > porous. I even tried blowing on a swatch but no air came
              > > > > through. I did find a research article on the web about the acoustic
              > > > > absorption properties of microfiber that indicated it was
              > > > > pretty good for use in curtains and office dividers, but I think the
              > > > > application was as a sound barrier. I also found a thread on a
              > > > > pro-audio forum where someone wanted to cover his acoustic panels in
              > > > > microfiber to prevent the fiberglass insulation from dispersing
              > > > > into the room. The consensus was not to do it.
              > > > >
              > > > > Anyone have experience with microfiber covered chairs?
              > > > >
              > > > > Last year I bought a stuffed cloth-covered chair that I thought was
              > > > > perfect, only to discover I was getting a reflection off the
              > > > > ends of the armrests when I took a measurement (the upper frequency
              > > > > response was squiggly and the step response looked like I had an
              > > > > extra tweeter.) The ends of the armrests were the only place on the chair
              > > > > that lacked stuffing. I couldn't return it because it
              > > > > was a special order.
              > > > >
              > > > > Tip
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
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