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Re:Kismet--well, maybe not

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  • regsrus2000
    It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that This is My Night of Nights could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely
    Message 1 of 27 , Nov 3, 2011
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      It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.

      Am I getting any warmer?

      David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)

      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
      > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
      >
      > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
      > One of my musical friends once said to me
      > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
      > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
      >
      > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
      > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
      > perhaps?)
      >
      > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
      >
      > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
      > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
      > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
      > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
      > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
      > is hopeless.
      >
      > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
      > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
      > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
      > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
      >
      > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
      > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
      > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
      > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
      > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
      > are amused by such things
      >
      > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
      > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
      > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
      >
      > REG
      >
      > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
      > >
      > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
      > >
      > > DG
      > >
      > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
      > > > was old fashioned. And such things
      > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
      > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
      > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
      > > > where the plot(which among other things
      > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
      > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
      > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
      > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
      > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
      > > > the tunes in their original setting without
      > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
      > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
      > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
      > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
      > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
      > > > song
      > > > "This is the night of my nights"
      > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
      > > > I am sure he knows.)
      > > >
      > > > REG
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hello, Tip.
      > > > >
      > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
      > > > >
      > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
      > > > >
      > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Hi David,
      > > > > >
      > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
      > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Best Regards,
      > > > > > Tip
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Robert
      Points for not looking it up! But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor. If you want to give up(and I would not blame you), let me know and I ll tell! If you want a
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 3, 2011
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        Points for not looking it up!
        But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
        If you want to give up(and I would not
        blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
        If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
        If not, don't!

        REG

        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@...> wrote:
        >
        > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
        >
        > Am I getting any warmer?
        >
        > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
        >
        >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
      • regsrus2000
        No hints! No scrolling! Guess I ll just have to listen to more Borodin! David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)
        Message 3 of 27 , Nov 3, 2011
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          No hints! No scrolling! Guess I'll just have to listen to more Borodin!

          David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)

          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
          >
          > Points for not looking it up!
          > But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
          > If you want to give up(and I would not
          > blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
          > If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
          > If not, don't!
          >
          > REG
          >
          > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
          > >
          > > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
          > >
          > > Am I getting any warmer?
          > >
          > > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
          > >
          > >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
          >
        • Robert
          Wonderful music , isn t it?(the Dohnanyi) And his Konzertsuck for cello--just too beautiful (Starker recorded that twice, once on EMT, once much later on
          Message 4 of 27 , Nov 3, 2011
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            Wonderful music , isn't it?(the Dohnanyi)
            And his Konzertsuck for cello--just too beautiful
            (Starker recorded that twice, once on EMT, once
            much later on Delos. Treasures , both those recordings.
            And I heard Starker play it live--from the front row center.
            Wow).

            As it happened, I actually knew Dohnanyi(the Elder, the composer),
            when he was very old and I was very young. (My uncle Karl Kuersteiner
            was the Dean of the Florida State University School of Music while
            Dohnanyi was there, at the end of his life and I went there often). He was a very nice man and told me he liked my playing, when I played for him. I treasure that even though I know--and knew even then-- that he had heard so many young people that he was surely just being nice.

            But in any case, it was an awe-inspiring experience to be in the presence of a man who was not only a great composer himself but who also had known Brahms and earned Brahms' respect, too, which was not easy to come by.

            I played Dohnanyi's Piano Quintet no 1 recently. At the end I was
            really excited and I said to my fellow musicians
            "It is just like being a teenager again".
            And it actually was.

            REG

            PS I also encountered Rachmaninoff-- but prenatally. My mother heard his last concert two months before I was born. The thought of this
            has always inspired me, but knowing Dohnanyi has the advantage
            that I can remember it! My first memory is musical(hearing my
            mother and colleagues rehearsing the Beethoven Archduke Trio)
            but that was some time after I was born!



            --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@...> wrote:
            >
            > No hints! No scrolling! Guess I'll just have to listen to more Borodin!
            >
            > David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)
            >
            > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Points for not looking it up!
            > > But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
            > > If you want to give up(and I would not
            > > blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
            > > If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
            > > If not, don't!
            > >
            > > REG
            > >
            > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
            > > >
            > > > Am I getting any warmer?
            > > >
            > > > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
            > > >
            > > >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
            > >
            >
          • regsrus2000
            Yes, I really enjoy that CD, though I ve had it (and thereby known the music) for only about a year. Thanks for alerting me to the Cello Concerto. I ll make
            Message 5 of 27 , Nov 4, 2011
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              Yes, I really enjoy that CD, though I've had it (and thereby known the music) for only about a year. Thanks for alerting me to the Cello Concerto. I'll make a point of buying and getting to know it.

              It must have been wonderful hearing Starker play it from such a seat. Susi and I first heard the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto live from the same location, played by Eugene Fodor. What a thrill! It was the first time I'd ever realized what double stops were, and I was just flabbergasted. A few years later we heard Ricci do the Mendelssohn from about the same location. One never forgets such things.

              Having known Dohnanyi must be a very special memory for you, and his connection to Brahms (and, I would guess, Joachim, among others) must have given it a very special emotional loading for you.

              Rachmaninov is one of my earliest musical memories, too. My sister, who is seventeen years older than I, was already an advanced piano student when I came along. I recall standing at her left elbow while she played his Prelude in C-sharp minor, fascinated by the weight and drama of those first three chords. She told me the music was by Rachmaninov, and taught me to say his name. Since she knows how old she was when she first learned the work, we were able, a decade or so ago, to compute my own age at the time. My early experiences of hearing her play a wide range of music must have played a part in prompting my own love of piano music.

              You (and others who may have read my posts here) have probably realized my audiophilia, such as it is, is actually driven by the desire to hear *music*, not equipment. Please, everyone, continue to mention favorite recordings in your postings, because I often buy the ones you name.

              David in NC, who heard Stravinksy's ballets Apollo, Agon, and Orpheus (Robert Craft conducting, on Naxos) and the first disk of La Boheme (Moffo et al./Leinsdorf/RCA SACD) this afternoon.



              --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Wonderful music , isn't it?(the Dohnanyi)
              > And his Konzertsuck for cello--just too beautiful
              > (Starker recorded that twice, once on EMT, once
              > much later on Delos. Treasures , both those recordings.
              > And I heard Starker play it live--from the front row center.
              > Wow).
              >
              > As it happened, I actually knew Dohnanyi(the Elder, the composer),
              > when he was very old and I was very young. (My uncle Karl Kuersteiner
              > was the Dean of the Florida State University School of Music while
              > Dohnanyi was there, at the end of his life and I went there often). He was a very nice man and told me he liked my playing, when I played for him. I treasure that even though I know--and knew even then-- that he had heard so many young people that he was surely just being nice.
              >
              > But in any case, it was an awe-inspiring experience to be in the presence of a man who was not only a great composer himself but who also had known Brahms and earned Brahms' respect, too, which was not easy to come by.
              >
              > I played Dohnanyi's Piano Quintet no 1 recently. At the end I was
              > really excited and I said to my fellow musicians
              > "It is just like being a teenager again".
              > And it actually was.
              >
              > REG
              >
              > PS I also encountered Rachmaninoff-- but prenatally. My mother heard his last concert two months before I was born. The thought of this
              > has always inspired me, but knowing Dohnanyi has the advantage
              > that I can remember it! My first memory is musical(hearing my
              > mother and colleagues rehearsing the Beethoven Archduke Trio)
              > but that was some time after I was born!
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
              > >
              > > No hints! No scrolling! Guess I'll just have to listen to more Borodin!
              > >
              > > David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)
              > >
              > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Points for not looking it up!
              > > > But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
              > > > If you want to give up(and I would not
              > > > blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
              > > > If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
              > > > If not, don't!
              > > >
              > > > REG
              > > >
              > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
              > > > >
              > > > > Am I getting any warmer?
              > > > >
              > > > > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
              > > > >
              > > > >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Peter Allen
              ... Here s one of mine, which I just discovered a couple of months ago:  Verdi s Requiem with the Chicago Symphony under Muti.   This recording moves me for
              Message 6 of 27 , Nov 5, 2011
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                > Please, everyone, continue to mention favorite recordings in your postings, because I often buy the ones you name.
                Here's one of mine, which I just discovered a couple of months ago:  Verdi's Requiem with the Chicago Symphony under Muti.
                 
                This recording moves me for several reasons:
                 
                    1. I have fond memories of Muti's days with the Philadelphia Orchestra, especially when he performed "big Italian works" like The Pines and Fountains.  I find this Requiem performance electrifying. The recording was stitched together from live performances between Jan 15th -- Jan 17th 2009, which received a Chicago Sun-Times review as glowing as my own! ( http://viewfromhere.typepad.com/the_view_from_here/2009/01/muti-cso-verdi-requiem-what-more-is-there-to-say.html )
                 
                    2. The recording was engineered by the CSO's own in-house recording team and was released on the CSO's Resound label.  I realize that in-house recordings offer no guarantees of superiority, but at least they aren't mastered by international labels trying to replicate their label's "house sound."
                 
                    3.  The recording is an SACD hybrid.  I haven't listened to the SACD stereo layer, though I expect it would offer a dynamic range similar to what the MC layer does, which is far wider than anything I've ever heard from conventional Red-book playback.
                 
                    4.  The MC version is amazing, at least to these old ears, without being gimmicky or exagerated--this is anything but one of those "put the microphone(s) in the middle of the orchestra" recordings.
                 
                 

                From: regsrus2000 <wooftweet@...>
                To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, November 4, 2011 7:24 PM
                Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re:Kismet--well, maybe not

                 
                Yes, I really enjoy that CD, though I've had it (and thereby known the music) for only about a year. Thanks for alerting me to the Cello Concerto. I'll make a point of buying and getting to know it.

                It must have been wonderful hearing Starker play it from such a seat. Susi and I first heard the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto live from the same location, played by Eugene Fodor. What a thrill! It was the first time I'd ever realized what double stops were, and I was just flabbergasted. A few years later we heard Ricci do the Mendelssohn from about the same location. One never forgets such things.

                Having known Dohnanyi must be a very special memory for you, and his connection to Brahms (and, I would guess, Joachim, among others) must have given it a very special emotional loading for you.

                Rachmaninov is one of my earliest musical memories, too. My sister, who is seventeen years older than I, was already an advanced piano student when I came along. I recall standing at her left elbow while she played his Prelude in C-sharp minor, fascinated by the weight and drama of those first three chords. She told me the music was by Rachmaninov, and taught me to say his name. Since she knows how old she was when she first learned the work, we were able, a decade or so ago, to compute my own age at the time. My early experiences of hearing her play a wide range of music must have played a part in prompting my own love of piano music.

                You (and others who may have read my posts here) have probably realized my audiophilia, such as it is, is actually driven by the desire to hear *music*, not equipment. Please, everyone, continue to mention favorite recordings in your postings, because I often buy the ones you name.

                David in NC, who heard Stravinksy's ballets Apollo, Agon, and Orpheus (Robert Craft conducting, on Naxos) and the first disk of La Boheme (Moffo et al./Leinsdorf/RCA SACD) this afternoon.

                --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Wonderful music , isn't it?(the Dohnanyi)
                > And his Konzertsuck for cello--just too beautiful
                > (Starker recorded that twice, once on EMT, once
                > much later on Delos. Treasures , both those recordings.
                > And I heard Starker play it live--from the front row center.
                > Wow).
                >
                > As it happened, I actually knew Dohnanyi(the Elder, the composer),
                > when he was very old and I was very young. (My uncle Karl Kuersteiner
                > was the Dean of the Florida State University School of Music while
                > Dohnanyi was there, at the end of his life and I went there often). He was a very nice man and told me he liked my playing, when I played for him. I treasure that even though I know--and knew even then-- that he had heard so many young people that he was surely just being nice.
                >
                > But in any case, it was an awe-inspiring experience to be in the presence of a man who was not only a great composer himself but who also had known Brahms and earned Brahms' respect, too, which was not easy to come by.
                >
                > I played Dohnanyi's Piano Quintet no 1 recently. At the end I was
                > really excited and I said to my fellow musicians
                > "It is just like being a teenager again".
                > And it actually was.
                >
                > REG
                >
                > PS I also encountered Rachmaninoff-- but prenatally. My mother heard his last concert two months before I was born. The thought of this
                > has always inspired me, but knowing Dohnanyi has the advantage
                > that I can remember it! My first memory is musical(hearing my
                > mother and colleagues rehearsing the Beethoven Archduke Trio)
                > but that was some time after I was born!
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                > >
                > > No hints! No scrolling! Guess I'll just have to listen to more Borodin!
                > >
                > > David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)
                > >
                > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Points for not looking it up!
                > > > But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
                > > > If you want to give up(and I would not
                > > > blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
                > > > If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
                > > > If not, don't!
                > > >
                > > > REG
                > > >
                > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
                > > > >
                > > > > Am I getting any warmer?
                > > > >
                > > > > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
                > > > >
                > > > >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
                > > >
                > >
                >



              • Ken Holder
                ... Which is the way it SHOULD be! Ken Holder Just a Poor, Old, Simple, Country-Living, Music-Lover
                Message 7 of 27 , Nov 5, 2011
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                  At 04:24 PM 11/4/2011, regsrus2000 wrote:

                  >You (and others who may have read my posts here) have probably
                  >realized my audiophilia, such as it is, is actually driven by the
                  >desire to hear *music*, not equipment.


                  Which is the way it SHOULD be!

                  Ken Holder
                  Just a Poor, Old, Simple, Country-Living, Music-Lover
                • regsrus2000
                  Peter, Thanks so much for your reply, and for calling our attention to the CSO/Muti recording of Verdi s Requiem. I look forward to hearing it when it
                  Message 8 of 27 , Nov 11, 2011
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                    Peter,

                    Thanks so much for your reply, and for calling our attention to the CSO/Muti recording of Verdi's Requiem. I look forward to hearing it when it arrives.

                    Sorry it took me so long to reply!

                    David in NC, listening to the Dresden/Sanderling set of the Brahms Symphonies on Eurodisc--Great Brahms conducting! Great orchestral playing! Fabulous horn soloist (Peter Damm, since retired - uses vibrato, somewhat strange to many western ears, but as fine a musician as ever lived. Think of him as a singer on the horn.)

                    P.S. I have never heard Brahms' Haydn Variations played with such characterization, as if it was a major work. Which it is. Wow!

                    --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Peter Allen <alcomdata@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > Please, everyone, continue to mention favorite recordings in your postings, because I often buy the ones you name.
                    >
                    > Here's one of mine, which I just discovered a couple of months ago:  Verdi's Requiem with the Chicago Symphony under Muti.
                    >  
                    > This recording moves me for several reasons:
                    >  
                    >     1. I have fond memories of Muti's days with the Philadelphia Orchestra, especially when he performed "big Italian works" like The Pines and Fountains.  I find this Requiem performance electrifying. The recording was stitched together from live performances between Jan 15th -- Jan 17th 2009, which received a Chicago Sun-Times review as glowing as my own! ( http://viewfromhere.typepad.com/the_view_from_here/2009/01/muti-cso-verdi-requiem-what-more-is-there-to-say.html%c3%82%c2%a0)
                    >  
                    >     2. The recording was engineered by the CSO's own in-house recording team and was released on the CSO's Resound label.  I realize that in-house recordings offer no guarantees of superiority, but at least they aren't mastered by international labels trying to replicate their label's "house sound."
                    >  
                    >     3.  The recording is an SACD hybrid.  I haven't listened to the SACD stereo layer, though I expect it would offer a dynamic range similar to what the MC layer does, which is far wider than anything I've ever heard from conventional Red-book playback.
                    >  
                    >     4.  The MC version is amazing, at least to these old ears, without being gimmicky or exagerated--this is anything but one of those "put the microphone(s) in the middle of the orchestra" recordings.
                    >  
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: regsrus2000 <wooftweet@...>
                    > To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Friday, November 4, 2011 7:24 PM
                    > Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re:Kismet--well, maybe not
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    > Yes, I really enjoy that CD, though I've had it (and thereby known the music) for only about a year. Thanks for alerting me to the Cello Concerto. I'll make a point of buying and getting to know it.
                    >
                    > It must have been wonderful hearing Starker play it from such a seat. Susi and I first heard the Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto live from the same location, played by Eugene Fodor. What a thrill! It was the first time I'd ever realized what double stops were, and I was just flabbergasted. A few years later we heard Ricci do the Mendelssohn from about the same location. One never forgets such things.
                    >
                    > Having known Dohnanyi must be a very special memory for you, and his connection to Brahms (and, I would guess, Joachim, among others) must have given it a very special emotional loading for you.
                    >
                    > Rachmaninov is one of my earliest musical memories, too. My sister, who is seventeen years older than I, was already an advanced piano student when I came along. I recall standing at her left elbow while she played his Prelude in C-sharp minor, fascinated by the weight and drama of those first three chords. She told me the music was by Rachmaninov, and taught me to say his name. Since she knows how old she was when she first learned the work, we were able, a decade or so ago, to compute my own age at the time. My early experiences of hearing her play a wide range of music must have played a part in prompting my own love of piano music.
                    >
                    > You (and others who may have read my posts here) have probably realized my audiophilia, such as it is, is actually driven by the desire to hear *music*, not equipment. Please, everyone, continue to mention favorite recordings in your postings, because I often buy the ones you name.
                    >
                    > David in NC, who heard Stravinksy's ballets Apollo, Agon, and Orpheus (Robert Craft conducting, on Naxos) and the first disk of La Boheme (Moffo et al./Leinsdorf/RCA SACD) this afternoon.
                    >
                    > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Wonderful music , isn't it?(the Dohnanyi)
                    > > And his Konzertsuck for cello--just too beautiful
                    > > (Starker recorded that twice, once on EMT, once
                    > > much later on Delos. Treasures , both those recordings.
                    > > And I heard Starker play it live--from the front row center.
                    > > Wow).
                    > >
                    > > As it happened, I actually knew Dohnanyi(the Elder, the composer),
                    > > when he was very old and I was very young. (My uncle Karl Kuersteiner
                    > > was the Dean of the Florida State University School of Music while
                    > > Dohnanyi was there, at the end of his life and I went there often). He was a very nice man and told me he liked my playing, when I played for him. I treasure that even though I know--and knew even then-- that he had heard so many young people that he was surely just being nice.
                    > >
                    > > But in any case, it was an awe-inspiring experience to be in the presence of a man who was not only a great composer himself but who also had known Brahms and earned Brahms' respect, too, which was not easy to come by.
                    > >
                    > > I played Dohnanyi's Piano Quintet no 1 recently. At the end I was
                    > > really excited and I said to my fellow musicians
                    > > "It is just like being a teenager again".
                    > > And it actually was.
                    > >
                    > > REG
                    > >
                    > > PS I also encountered Rachmaninoff-- but prenatally. My mother heard his last concert two months before I was born. The thought of this
                    > > has always inspired me, but knowing Dohnanyi has the advantage
                    > > that I can remember it! My first memory is musical(hearing my
                    > > mother and colleagues rehearsing the Beethoven Archduke Trio)
                    > > but that was some time after I was born!
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > No hints! No scrolling! Guess I'll just have to listen to more Borodin!
                    > > >
                    > > > David in NC (listening to Dohnanyi Violin Cto. No. 1, Michael Ludwig/Naxos)
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Points for not looking it up!
                    > > > > But no, sorry, it is not Prince Igor.
                    > > > > If you want to give up(and I would not
                    > > > > blame you), let me know and I'll tell!
                    > > > > If you want a hint, scroll down to the end.
                    > > > > If not, don't!
                    > > > >
                    > > > > REG
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > It occurred to me while driving to the office Tuesday morning that "This is My Night of Nights" could well be set to music from Prince Igor. It sounds vaguely familiar, and I saw the Kirov Opera do Prince Igor at the Met about a decade ago. I don't have the opera on DVD or CD, so can't be sure, and I didn't want to cheat and look it up. (Still haven't!) That was a beautiful evening, as was the night before (Tchaikovsky's Mazeppa). And what a wonderful orchestra the Kirov (now Maryinski) was, with Gergiev conducting.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Am I getting any warmer?
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > David in NC (listening for the first time to that delicious Rachmaninov Symphonic Dances CD by Dallas/Mata - now into the Grieg Symphonic Dances, which are new to me. Thanks to EVERYONE for mentioning really good recordings here!)
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > >PPS Hint: Think piano music(orchestrated by someone else)
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • regsrus2000
                    Yes, Ken! David in NC
                    Message 9 of 27 , Nov 11, 2011
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                      Yes, Ken!

                      David in NC

                      --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Ken Holder <ken_holder@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > At 04:24 PM 11/4/2011, regsrus2000 wrote:
                      >
                      > >You (and others who may have read my posts here) have probably
                      > >realized my audiophilia, such as it is, is actually driven by the
                      > >desire to hear *music*, not equipment.
                      >
                      >
                      > Which is the way it SHOULD be!
                      >
                      > Ken Holder
                      > Just a Poor, Old, Simple, Country-Living, Music-Lover
                      >
                    • regsrus2000
                      Okay, Robert. Night of My Nights is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It s the next-to-last track
                      Message 10 of 27 , Nov 11, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Okay, Robert. "Night of My Nights" is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It's the next-to-last track of the CD I ordered, and is recognizable in the track samples at Amazon.

                        I've never owned the Petite Suite, though I was aware of it from one of Robbii Wessen's TAS covers. Do you remember it? (I always had great fun trying to guess those before looking inside, and do the same thing with The New Yorker every week, though not often successfully.)

                        I REALLY liked Robbii's covers, and Harry's back cover photography. They helped make the magazine personal, made it matter, for me.

                        David in NC

                        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
                        > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
                        >
                        > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
                        > One of my musical friends once said to me
                        > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
                        > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
                        >
                        > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
                        > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
                        > perhaps?)
                        >
                        > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
                        >
                        > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
                        > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
                        > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
                        > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
                        > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
                        > is hopeless.
                        >
                        > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
                        > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
                        > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
                        > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
                        >
                        > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
                        > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
                        > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
                        > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
                        > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
                        > are amused by such things
                        >
                        > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
                        > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
                        > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
                        >
                        > REG
                        >
                        > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
                        > >
                        > > DG
                        > >
                        > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
                        > > > was old fashioned. And such things
                        > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
                        > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
                        > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
                        > > > where the plot(which among other things
                        > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
                        > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
                        > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
                        > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
                        > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
                        > > > the tunes in their original setting without
                        > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
                        > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
                        > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
                        > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
                        > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
                        > > > song
                        > > > "This is the night of my nights"
                        > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
                        > > > I am sure he knows.)
                        > > >
                        > > > REG
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Hello, Tip.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
                        > > > >
                        > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Hi David,
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
                        > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Best Regards,
                        > > > > > Tip
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Robert
                        Bravo! It is the Serenade from that suite. I admire both your expertise and your determination not to look(the Wikipedia article on Kismet actually says, for
                        Message 11 of 27 , Nov 12, 2011
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                          Bravo! It is the Serenade from that suite.

                          I admire both your expertise and your determination
                          not to look(the Wikipedia article on Kismet actually
                          says, for those who wanted a shortcut)

                          The whole Petite Suite is really delightful music,
                          also in Glazuunov's orchestration.

                          I always enjoyed Robbii's covers myself.
                          Still do! (I have all the issues)
                          And Harry photos were fun, too.

                          REG


                          --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Okay, Robert. "Night of My Nights" is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It's the next-to-last track of the CD I ordered, and is recognizable in the track samples at Amazon.
                          >
                          > I've never owned the Petite Suite, though I was aware of it from one of Robbii Wessen's TAS covers. Do you remember it? (I always had great fun trying to guess those before looking inside, and do the same thing with The New Yorker every week, though not often successfully.)
                          >
                          > I REALLY liked Robbii's covers, and Harry's back cover photography. They helped make the magazine personal, made it matter, for me.
                          >
                          > David in NC
                          >
                          > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
                          > > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
                          > >
                          > > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
                          > > One of my musical friends once said to me
                          > > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
                          > > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
                          > >
                          > > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
                          > > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
                          > > perhaps?)
                          > >
                          > > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
                          > >
                          > > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
                          > > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
                          > > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
                          > > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
                          > > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
                          > > is hopeless.
                          > >
                          > > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
                          > > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
                          > > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
                          > > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
                          > >
                          > > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
                          > > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
                          > > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
                          > > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
                          > > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
                          > > are amused by such things
                          > >
                          > > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
                          > > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
                          > > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
                          > >
                          > > REG
                          > >
                          > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
                          > > >
                          > > > DG
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
                          > > > > was old fashioned. And such things
                          > > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
                          > > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
                          > > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
                          > > > > where the plot(which among other things
                          > > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
                          > > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
                          > > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
                          > > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
                          > > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
                          > > > > the tunes in their original setting without
                          > > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
                          > > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
                          > > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
                          > > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
                          > > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
                          > > > > song
                          > > > > "This is the night of my nights"
                          > > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
                          > > > > I am sure he knows.)
                          > > > >
                          > > > > REG
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Hello, Tip.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Hi David,
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
                          > > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Best Regards,
                          > > > > > > Tip
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • regsrus2000
                          Not at all, Robert. It was a lot of fun. I thought more about Borodin in the last week than in my entire life before! From your mentioning Glazunov s
                          Message 12 of 27 , Nov 12, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Not at all, Robert. It was a lot of fun. I thought more about Borodin in the last week than in my entire life before!

                            From your mentioning Glazunov's orchestration of the Petite Suite, I gather that it was originally for piano, perhaps. It's the orchestrated version that's coming. I'll look for the piano (or whatever) version, too.

                            David in NC

                            --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Bravo! It is the Serenade from that suite.
                            >
                            > I admire both your expertise and your determination
                            > not to look(the Wikipedia article on Kismet actually
                            > says, for those who wanted a shortcut)
                            >
                            > The whole Petite Suite is really delightful music,
                            > also in Glazuunov's orchestration.
                            >
                            > I always enjoyed Robbii's covers myself.
                            > Still do! (I have all the issues)
                            > And Harry photos were fun, too.
                            >
                            > REG
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Okay, Robert. "Night of My Nights" is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It's the next-to-last track of the CD I ordered, and is recognizable in the track samples at Amazon.
                            > >
                            > > I've never owned the Petite Suite, though I was aware of it from one of Robbii Wessen's TAS covers. Do you remember it? (I always had great fun trying to guess those before looking inside, and do the same thing with The New Yorker every week, though not often successfully.)
                            > >
                            > > I REALLY liked Robbii's covers, and Harry's back cover photography. They helped make the magazine personal, made it matter, for me.
                            > >
                            > > David in NC
                            > >
                            > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
                            > > > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
                            > > >
                            > > > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
                            > > > One of my musical friends once said to me
                            > > > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
                            > > > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
                            > > >
                            > > > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
                            > > > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
                            > > > perhaps?)
                            > > >
                            > > > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
                            > > >
                            > > > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
                            > > > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
                            > > > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
                            > > > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
                            > > > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
                            > > > is hopeless.
                            > > >
                            > > > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
                            > > > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
                            > > > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
                            > > > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
                            > > >
                            > > > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
                            > > > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
                            > > > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
                            > > > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
                            > > > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
                            > > > are amused by such things
                            > > >
                            > > > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
                            > > > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
                            > > > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
                            > > >
                            > > > REG
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
                            > > > >
                            > > > > DG
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
                            > > > > > was old fashioned. And such things
                            > > > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
                            > > > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
                            > > > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
                            > > > > > where the plot(which among other things
                            > > > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
                            > > > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
                            > > > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
                            > > > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
                            > > > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
                            > > > > > the tunes in their original setting without
                            > > > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
                            > > > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
                            > > > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
                            > > > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
                            > > > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
                            > > > > > song
                            > > > > > "This is the night of my nights"
                            > > > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
                            > > > > > I am sure he knows.)
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > REG
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Hello, Tip.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > Hi David,
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
                            > > > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > Best Regards,
                            > > > > > > > Tip
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Robert
                            Piano it was originally. The piano version I have been listening to(inspired by this discussion) is this
                            Message 13 of 27 , Nov 12, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Piano it was originally. The piano version
                              I have been listening to(inspired by this discussion)
                              is this
                              http://www.amazon.com/More-Bs-Borodin-Busoni-Berg/dp/B000009MG5/ref=sr_1_25?ie=UTF8&qid=1321153090&sr=8-25

                              I also have the piano version on vinyl somewhere--
                              if I could find it!

                              REG

                              --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Not at all, Robert. It was a lot of fun. I thought more about Borodin in the last week than in my entire life before!
                              >
                              > From your mentioning Glazunov's orchestration of the Petite Suite, I gather that it was originally for piano, perhaps. It's the orchestrated version that's coming. I'll look for the piano (or whatever) version, too.
                              >
                              > David in NC
                              >
                              > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Bravo! It is the Serenade from that suite.
                              > >
                              > > I admire both your expertise and your determination
                              > > not to look(the Wikipedia article on Kismet actually
                              > > says, for those who wanted a shortcut)
                              > >
                              > > The whole Petite Suite is really delightful music,
                              > > also in Glazuunov's orchestration.
                              > >
                              > > I always enjoyed Robbii's covers myself.
                              > > Still do! (I have all the issues)
                              > > And Harry photos were fun, too.
                              > >
                              > > REG
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Okay, Robert. "Night of My Nights" is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It's the next-to-last track of the CD I ordered, and is recognizable in the track samples at Amazon.
                              > > >
                              > > > I've never owned the Petite Suite, though I was aware of it from one of Robbii Wessen's TAS covers. Do you remember it? (I always had great fun trying to guess those before looking inside, and do the same thing with The New Yorker every week, though not often successfully.)
                              > > >
                              > > > I REALLY liked Robbii's covers, and Harry's back cover photography. They helped make the magazine personal, made it matter, for me.
                              > > >
                              > > > David in NC
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
                              > > > > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
                              > > > >
                              > > > > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
                              > > > > One of my musical friends once said to me
                              > > > > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
                              > > > > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
                              > > > > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
                              > > > > perhaps?)
                              > > > >
                              > > > > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
                              > > > > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
                              > > > > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
                              > > > > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
                              > > > > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
                              > > > > is hopeless.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
                              > > > > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
                              > > > > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
                              > > > > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
                              > > > > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
                              > > > > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
                              > > > > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
                              > > > > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
                              > > > > are amused by such things
                              > > > >
                              > > > > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
                              > > > > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
                              > > > > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
                              > > > >
                              > > > > REG
                              > > > >
                              > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > DG
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
                              > > > > > > was old fashioned. And such things
                              > > > > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
                              > > > > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
                              > > > > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
                              > > > > > > where the plot(which among other things
                              > > > > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
                              > > > > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
                              > > > > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
                              > > > > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
                              > > > > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
                              > > > > > > the tunes in their original setting without
                              > > > > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
                              > > > > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
                              > > > > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
                              > > > > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
                              > > > > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
                              > > > > > > song
                              > > > > > > "This is the night of my nights"
                              > > > > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
                              > > > > > > I am sure he knows.)
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > REG
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > Hello, Tip.
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
                              > > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > > Hi David,
                              > > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
                              > > > > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
                              > > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
                              > > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > > Best Regards,
                              > > > > > > > > Tip
                              > > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • regsrus2000
                              Thanks for that info, Robert. I ll get that disk and listen to it. I don t think I have a single CD with anything by Busoni. And probably no LP, either.
                              Message 14 of 27 , Nov 12, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Thanks for that info, Robert. I'll get that disk and listen to it. I don't think I have a single CD with anything by Busoni. And probably no LP, either.

                                David in NC

                                --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Piano it was originally. The piano version
                                > I have been listening to(inspired by this discussion)
                                > is this
                                > http://www.amazon.com/More-Bs-Borodin-Busoni-Berg/dp/B000009MG5/ref=sr_1_25?ie=UTF8&qid=1321153090&sr=8-25
                                >
                                > I also have the piano version on vinyl somewhere--
                                > if I could find it!
                                >
                                > REG
                                >
                                > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Not at all, Robert. It was a lot of fun. I thought more about Borodin in the last week than in my entire life before!
                                > >
                                > > From your mentioning Glazunov's orchestration of the Petite Suite, I gather that it was originally for piano, perhaps. It's the orchestrated version that's coming. I'll look for the piano (or whatever) version, too.
                                > >
                                > > David in NC
                                > >
                                > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Bravo! It is the Serenade from that suite.
                                > > >
                                > > > I admire both your expertise and your determination
                                > > > not to look(the Wikipedia article on Kismet actually
                                > > > says, for those who wanted a shortcut)
                                > > >
                                > > > The whole Petite Suite is really delightful music,
                                > > > also in Glazuunov's orchestration.
                                > > >
                                > > > I always enjoyed Robbii's covers myself.
                                > > > Still do! (I have all the issues)
                                > > > And Harry photos were fun, too.
                                > > >
                                > > > REG
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Okay, Robert. "Night of My Nights" is from the Petite Suite. Not sure of the track title, but should have it in house next week. It's the next-to-last track of the CD I ordered, and is recognizable in the track samples at Amazon.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > I've never owned the Petite Suite, though I was aware of it from one of Robbii Wessen's TAS covers. Do you remember it? (I always had great fun trying to guess those before looking inside, and do the same thing with The New Yorker every week, though not often successfully.)
                                > > > >
                                > > > > I REALLY liked Robbii's covers, and Harry's back cover photography. They helped make the magazine personal, made it matter, for me.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > David in NC
                                > > > >
                                > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > The source fo Night of my Mights is a little less familiar than the Polovtsian Dances
                                > > > > > (though some other stuff in Kismet is lifted from those)
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > But, well, Borodin tunes tend to have a certain similarity.
                                > > > > > One of my musical friends once said to me
                                > > > > > "Borodin only wrote one tune. (long pause) But
                                > > > > > of course it is one of the best tunes ever written".
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Busoni once said the same about Chopin, that he
                                > > > > > was always writing a waltz and the same one. (Jealousy
                                > > > > > perhaps?)
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > First part of the Borodin remark is not true of course, but second part is!
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Meanwhile, just to be clear: In no sense am I recommending
                                > > > > > the film. I had a look at some stuff on youtube.
                                > > > > > It is pretty much unwatchable! It was lots more
                                > > > > > fun on stage--and of course I was a lot younger then, too.
                                > > > > > A knockabout stage production maybe could be fun still. But the film
                                > > > > > is hopeless.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > The music remains great music, but it is vastly
                                > > > > > preferrable in its original form without the Broadway
                                > > > > > tarting up and without the Broadway words(which with a very few exceptions are not so good--but there are a couple of funny spots).
                                > > > > > Unless you are just curious< I would stick with Borodin straight.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Incidentally the (original) Borodin Quartet recorded the Borodin String Quartets. These recordings are worth latching onto.
                                > > > > > Quartet 2 is on London Stereo Treasury and is fairly easy to find.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > I apologize for reverting to my usual snobbish self
                                > > > > > but going back to Kismet after a long time became an argument for
                                > > > > > listening to the originals to my mind and forgetting the show--
                                > > > > > except as an exercise in Borodin identification for those who
                                > > > > > are amused by such things
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > So much for youthful memories!(I had not listened to Kismet
                                > > > > > for decades. Oddly enough I can remember almost all the words--
                                > > > > > shows what playing a show over and over will do for you).
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > REG
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > "The Night of My Nights" (I'm listening to Richard Kiley sing it via YouTube" sounds as if its based on some of the material in the Polovtsian Dances, though the melody is different (in the way that some movie music is an obvious reworking of a classical piece, but with the chords changed while the rhythmic structure is held constant). But that's not close enough to count as an answer. I'll just have to play through all my Borodin till I find it! :)
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > DG
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <regonaudio@> wrote:
                                > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > Well, I did warn people that the plot
                                > > > > > > > was old fashioned. And such things
                                > > > > > > > do much worse on film than on stage.
                                > > > > > > > Actually, it would probably be rather fun
                                > > > > > > > in an on stage revival in a small theater,
                                > > > > > > > where the plot(which among other things
                                > > > > > > > is outrageously male-chauvinist_ could be played for
                                > > > > > > > laughs a little, somewhat tongue in cheek.
                                > > > > > > > But the music is of course fabulous in the sense
                                > > > > > > > that hardly anyone could write tunes like
                                > > > > > > > Borodin. On the other hand, you can hear
                                > > > > > > > the tunes in their original setting without
                                > > > > > > > difficulty. The string quartets , the symphonies,
                                > > > > > > > and the Prince Igor music (Polovtsian Dances in particular)
                                > > > > > > > and Steppes of Central Asis about cover it.
                                > > > > > > > But you deserve to congratulate yourself if
                                > > > > > > > you can identify the Borodin work that the
                                > > > > > > > song
                                > > > > > > > "This is the night of my nights"
                                > > > > > > > comes from. (David E not allowed to compete!
                                > > > > > > > I am sure he knows.)
                                > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > REG
                                > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "regsrus2000" <wooftweet@> wrote:
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > Hello, Tip.
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > Yes, I thought I remembered having noticed it. In fact, I think I recorded it to the DVR, with a view to watching it later. But I erased it to make room for something more pressing (maybe Ancient Astronauts--LOL!
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > It couldn't be any worse than the Rocky Horror movie (of which I've never watched more than fifteen minutes, and only out of the vague awareness that I missed some cultural event). I'll make a point of watching it for the music, and for the lyrics Robert mentioned.
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > David in NC (who just heard Appalachian Spring on WCPE-FM)
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, Tip Johnson <Tip_Johnson@> wrote:
                                > > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > > Hi David,
                                > > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > > > Now I'll have to watch "Kismet." It's been vaguely on my
                                > > > > > > > > > > radar, but I've not seen it. Could it have been on TCM recently?
                                > > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > > The 1955 remake was on TCM about a month ago. The score may be great but the movie was awful.
                                > > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > > > Best Regards,
                                > > > > > > > > > Tip
                                > > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > > >
                                > > > > > >
                                > > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
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