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Re: [regsaudioforum] Sad news

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  • JK Mitra
    Robert, I am so sorry to hear about Freja s death. My condolences JK ... From: Robert To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2010 9:08
    Message 1 of 13 , Feb 28, 2010
      Robert, I am so sorry to hear about Freja's death.

      My condolences

      JK


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Robert
      To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2010 9:08 AM
      Subject: [regsaudioforum] Sad news




      Freja, my darling Doberman, the mascot of www.regonaudio.com
      and the Dobie girl whose photo you can see next to me in the home page of
      this forum, died last night.
    • Robert
      Thank you, I liked this very much. I am also fond of the story, sad though it is, of Hachiko. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hachik%C5%8D When I lived briefly in
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 1, 2010
        Thank you, I liked this very much.

        I am also fond of the story, sad though it is, of Hachiko.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hachik%C5%8D

        When I lived briefly in Tokyo in the early 1980s(on a mathematical visit), I used to live near Shibuya station and I saw the statue often. It always brought a tear to my eye.

        REG

        --- In regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie Daniell" <danvetc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Robert,
        >
        >
        >
        > In case you might not have seen this before, I have always enjoyed this
        > famous ode to the dog.
        >
        >
        >
        > Charlie
        >
        >
        >
        > [condensed from Wikipedia]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > George Graham Vest (December 6, 1830-August 9, 1904) was a
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S.> U.S. politician. Born in Frankfort
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankfort,_Kentucky> , Kentucky
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky> , he was known for his skills in
        > oration <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orator> and debate. Vest, a lawyer as
        > well as a politician, served as a Missouri Congressman
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_House_of_Representatives> , a
        > Confederate Congressman
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Congress_of_the_Confederate_States> during
        > the Civil War, and finally a <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US_Senator> US
        > Senator. He is best known for his closing arguments from the trial in which
        > damages were sought for the killing of a dog named Old Drum in 1855.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Vest took the case tried on September 23, 1870 in which he represented a
        > client whose hunting dog, a foxhound named Drum (or Old Drum), had been
        > killed by a sheep farmer. The farmer had previously announced his intentions
        > to kill any dog found on his property; the dog's owner was suing for damages
        > in the amount of $150, the maximum allowed by law.
        >
        > During the trial, Vest stated that he would "win the case or apologize to
        > every dog in Missouri." Vest's closing
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closing_argument> argument to the jury made
        > no reference to any of the testimony offered during the trial, and instead
        > offered a eulogy of sorts. Vest's "Eulogy on the Dog" is one of the most
        > enduring passages of purple <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_prose>
        > prose in American courtroom history (only a partial transcript has
        > survived):
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Old_Drum_Statue.JPG>
        > http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png"
        >
        > Gentlemen of the jury: The best friend a man has in this world may turn
        > against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter that he has reared
        > with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to
        > us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name, may become
        > traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies
        > away from him, perhaps when he needs it the most. A man's reputation may be
        > sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to
        > fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us may be the first
        > to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads.
        > The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man can have in this selfish
        > world, the one that never deserts him and the one that never proves
        > ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.
        >
        > Gentlemen of the jury: A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in
        > poverty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where
        > the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near
        > his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer, he will
        > lick the wounds and sores that come in encounters with the roughness of the
        > world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When
        > all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings and reputation
        > falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey
        > through the heavens.
        >
        > If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and
        > homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of
        > accompanying him to guard against danger, to fight against his enemies, and
        > when the last scene of all comes, and death takes the master in its embrace
        > and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends
        > pursue their way, there by his graveside will the noble dog be found, his
        > head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchfulness, faithful
        > and true even to death.
        >
        > "
        >
        > Vest won the case (a possibly apocryphal story of the case says that the
        > jury awarded $500 to the dog's owner) and also won its appeal to the
        > Missouri Supreme Court. A statue of the dog stands in front of the
        > Warrensburg, Missouri <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrensburg,_Missouri>
        > courthouse.
        >
      • Fred
        This too (of course) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyfriars_Bobby http://www.greyfriarsbobby.co.uk/ I m among so many who could not resist an impulse to
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 1, 2010
          This too (of course)
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greyfriars_Bobby
          http://www.greyfriarsbobby.co.uk/

          I'm among so many who could not resist an impulse to fondly touch that statue.

          Fred.


          --- On Mon, 1/3/10, Robert <regonaudio@...> wrote:


          From: Robert <regonaudio@...>
          Subject: [regsaudioforum] Re: faithful dogs(OT)
          To: regsaudioforum@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, 1 March, 2010, 20:53

          Thank you, I liked this very much.

          I am also fond of the story, sad though it is, of Hachiko.
          http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Hachik%C5% 8D

          When I lived briefly in Tokyo in the early 1980s(on a mathematical visit), I used to live near Shibuya station and I saw the statue often. It always brought a tear to my eye.

          REG

          --- In regsaudioforum@ yahoogroups. com, "Charlie Daniell" <danvetc@... > wrote:
          >
          > Robert,
          >
          >
          >
          > In case you might not have seen this before, I have always enjoyed this
          > famous ode to the dog.
          >
          >
          >
          > Charlie
          >
          >
          >
          > [condensed from Wikipedia]
          >
          >
          > George Graham Vest (December 6, 1830-August 9, 1904) was a
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ U.S.> U.S. politician. Born in Frankfort
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Frankfort, _Kentucky> , Kentucky
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Kentucky> , he was known for his skills in
          > oration <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Orator> and debate. Vest, a lawyer as
          > well as a politician, served as a Missouri Congressman
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Missouri_ House_of_ Representatives> , a
          > Confederate Congressman
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Congress_ of_the_Confedera te_States> during
          > the Civil War, and finally a <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ US_Senator> US
          > Senator. He is best known for his closing arguments from the trial in which
          > damages were sought for the killing of a dog named Old Drum in 1855.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Vest took the case tried on September 23, 1870 in which he represented a
          > client whose hunting dog, a foxhound named Drum (or Old Drum), had been
          > killed by a sheep farmer. The farmer had previously announced his intentions
          > to kill any dog found on his property; the dog's owner was suing for damages
          > in the amount of $150, the maximum allowed by law.
          >
          > During the trial, Vest stated that he would "win the case or apologize to
          > every dog in Missouri." Vest's closing
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Closing_argument> argument to the jury made
          > no reference to any of the testimony offered during the trial, and instead
          > offered a eulogy of sorts. Vest's "Eulogy on the Dog" is one of the most
          > enduring passages of purple <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Purple_prose>
          > prose in American courtroom history (only a partial transcript has
          > survived):
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ File:Old_ Drum_Statue. JPG>
          > http://bits. wikimedia. org/skins- 1.5/common/ images/magnify- clip.png"
          >
          > Gentlemen of the jury: The best friend a man has in this world may turn
          > against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter that he has reared
          > with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to
          > us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name, may become
          > traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies
          > away from him, perhaps when he needs it the most. A man's reputation may be
          > sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to
          > fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us may be the first
          > to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads.
          > The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man can have in this selfish
          > world, the one that never deserts him and the one that never proves
          > ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.
          >
          > Gentlemen of the jury: A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in
          > poverty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where
          > the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near
          > his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer, he will
          > lick the wounds and sores that come in encounters with the roughness of the
          > world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When
          > all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings and reputation
          > falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey
          > through the heavens.
          >
          > If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and
          > homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of
          > accompanying him to guard against danger, to fight against his enemies, and
          > when the last scene of all comes, and death takes the master in its embrace
          > and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends
          > pursue their way, there by his graveside will the noble dog be found, his
          > head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchfulness, faithful
          > and true even to death.
          >
          > "
          >
          > Vest won the case (a possibly apocryphal story of the case says that the
          > jury awarded $500 to the dog's owner) and also won its appeal to the
          > Missouri Supreme Court. A statue of the dog stands in front of the
          > Warrensburg, Missouri <http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Warrensburg, _Missouri>
          > courthouse.
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