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Re: UHF regen

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  • steam4ian
    G day all I build a rush box using a 12AT7 working on 6 metres; half the valve was a grounded grid input stage. My antenna was a folded dipole, for 300 ohm
    Message 1 of 12 , May 3, 2010
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      G'day all

      I build a rush box using a 12AT7 working on 6 metres; half the valve was a grounded grid input stage.

      My antenna was a folded dipole, for 300 ohm line, mounted on the family rotary clothes line. My QTH was Adelaide and my best reception was somewhere in Queensland, probably about 2500 miles.

      When going well super regens could suck in signals.

      I still have the receiver but the PS died long ago,

      Regards
      Ian

      --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, Bill M <radioexray@...> wrote:
      >
      > catboat15@... wrote:
      > > Oh, Yes, the Heath Twoer and Sixer. One advantage of those old super regens
      > > was you heard everyone on the band and could work them (within the limits
      > > of what xtal you had plugged in)
      > >
      > > I used my "Sixer" (Also called the "Benton Harbor Lunch Box") to make a lot
      > > of QSO's until ...
      >
      > Hi Cuz,
      >
      > Speaking of Sixer tales. I had one briefly and worked Chile with a
      > twinlead dipole hanging in the window. I thought one of the local guys
      > was screwing with me. QSL card eventually arrived. That was the only
      > contact I ever made apart from the local fellows.
      >
      > -Bill Meacham
      >
    • mikrowaveman
      Hi Ian, Andrew Anderson VK3CV who has a place on Mt. Macedon overlooking Melbourne just flew in to New Hampshire Wed of last week. He is a great VHF/UHF guy
      Message 2 of 12 , May 3, 2010
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        Hi Ian,

        Andrew Anderson VK3CV who has a place on Mt. Macedon overlooking Melbourne just flew in to New Hampshire Wed of last week. He is a great VHF/UHF guy (having line-of-sight to Tasmania) and is a great friend. He married a local woman here in the states and has a double life so to speak. Anyway he is giving a talk tomorrow night at the local ham club on VHF/UHF Down Under. I think he held some microwave records for a long time.

        Mike WU2D
      • davidpnewkirk
        ... As others have suggested, do use some sort of RF amplifier ahead of a superregenerative detector if you use one, because superregens radiate a broad,
        Message 3 of 12 , May 3, 2010
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          --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "aisea6" <aisea@...> wrote:

          > I am looking for a 435mhz circuit to be able to monitor the Chinese Hope1 satellite.

          As others have suggested, do use some sort of RF amplifier ahead of a superregenerative detector if you use one, because superregens radiate a broad, relatively strong signal that can and will interfere with two-way communication.

          I grew up 3 miles east of Chicago's O'Hare airport in the 1960s and 1970s. In the mid-60s, my father, a radio amateur since 1937, decided that he wanted to listen in on air traffic control communication and so built himself a superregen that covered FM broadcast and the aeronautical frequencies above it. After using it for some weeks he began hearing pilots complaining of radio interference that peaked 3 miles east of the field, and then one day also heard the tower mention that a direction-finding team would soon be out trying to find it. He immediately turned off the superregen forever receiver and ultimately replaced it with a converter that brought VHF aero signals down into the shortwave range for reception on a communications receiver.

          Best regards,

          Dave/W9VES
        • pappy_hiram
          Sounds like my kind of project! got a circuit? Pappy Hiram
          Message 4 of 12 , May 4, 2010
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            Sounds like my kind of project! got a circuit?

            Pappy Hiram


            --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "steam4ian" <fosterscons@...> wrote:
            >
            > G'day all
            >
            > I build a rush box using a 12AT7 working on 6 metres; half the valve was a grounded grid input stage.
            >
            > My antenna was a folded dipole, for 300 ohm line, mounted on the family rotary clothes line. My QTH was Adelaide and my best reception was somewhere in Queensland, probably about 2500 miles.
            >
            > When going well super regens could suck in signals.
            >
            > I still have the receiver but the PS died long ago,
            >
            > Regards
            > Ian
            >
            > --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, Bill M <radioexray@> wrote:
            > >
            > > catboat15@ wrote:
            > > > Oh, Yes, the Heath Twoer and Sixer. One advantage of those old super regens
            > > > was you heard everyone on the band and could work them (within the limits
            > > > of what xtal you had plugged in)
            > > >
            > > > I used my "Sixer" (Also called the "Benton Harbor Lunch Box") to make a lot
            > > > of QSO's until ...
            > >
            > > Hi Cuz,
            > >
            > > Speaking of Sixer tales. I had one briefly and worked Chile with a
            > > twinlead dipole hanging in the window. I thought one of the local guys
            > > was screwing with me. QSL card eventually arrived. That was the only
            > > contact I ever made apart from the local fellows.
            > >
            > > -Bill Meacham
            > >
            >
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