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Re: Introduction and question for the group

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  • kyoritsu
    Hello Jeramy, Some thoughts on chassis construction. I also don t like working with metal. But wood s OK, right? For the chassis top, I use thin plywood,
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2009
      Hello Jeramy,

      Some thoughts on chassis construction. I also don't like working with metal. But wood's OK, right?

      For the chassis top, I use thin plywood, 3/16ths or so. When glued and screwed/nailed to two upright pieces of 2X4, it's sturdy, easy to drill tube sockets holes in, and not too thick to get in the way. I've also seen stiff plastic, about 1/8 inch, intended to be used as a cutting board: this might good for the chassis top in place of the plywood. Saw it at a 100 yen ($1.00) shop. Of course, with wood or plastic, you'll have to use a ground buss or single point grounding, which is actually a good thing for regens and audio amps.

      If you make the chassis about 2 inches high, you'll be able to put large knobs on the tuning capacitors and get a 'vernier' effect. I use a 4 inch clear plastic disk with a small knob glued to the center. The small knob provides a way to mount it on the capacitor shaft, but of course I use the wide plastic disk for tuning. A protractor gives me a logging scale.


      For the front panel, I use another piece of thin plywood (a nicer piece of plywood veneer) with thin aluminum sheeting glued to it; the aluminum can even be foil wrap if you handle it carefully. This should be electrically connected to the ground buss.


      For a good, basic twin triode design, go to Gary's site:

      http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/1948Rf.HTM

      I made a variation of this circuit and it was the first radio I've ever built that worked the first time!

      Good luck

      Rob


      --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "Jeramy A. Ross" <w5xtl@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello all,
      >
      > My name is Jeramy, and I've been tinkering in radio for a couple
      > decades now. I've always had a admiration for regens, but up until now
      > my sole experience with them have been that obtained through building
      > various kits. With the Fall/Winter seasons approaching, I feel it's
      > time for me to step up to gathering parts and building my first one
      > from scratch. There is where my question comes in. There are
      > literally tons of circuits out there. My desires in my first project
      > are as follows:
      >
      > 1) 1 to 2 tube circuit.
      > 2) Covering from the MW BC band thru at least 15MHz or so
      > preferably with plug-in coils. Not up to fancy band switching
      > schemes yet.
      > 3) Breadboard-able... My metal working skills are sub-par at
      > best... A nice plank of wood suits me much better.
      >
      > So.. with that in mind, any suggestions out there?
      >
      > Thank you in advance,
      > Jeramy/W5XTL
      >
    • wd4nka
      Back when you could get those Red Jacket QSTs from the early 1930s for free from OTers clearing out their junque boxes, we Novices would grab em. I believe
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2009
        Back when you could get those "Red Jacket" QSTs from the early
        1930s for free from OTers clearing out their junque boxes, we
        Novices would grab 'em. I believe there is no better resource
        for homebrewing from a mechanical standpoint. Maybe even from
        a circuity standpoint as well, if you like Valves. During the
        Depression you pretty much used what was available, and a lot
        of creativity thrived. Another reason why we grabbed 'em was
        because the cutting edge radio of 1936 could be built to utter
        extactidude via the local military surplus places in th early-
        mid 1970s. Almost everything featured in QST between 1934 and
        1939 could be built entirely from the surplus stock at Orlando's
        Skycraft Military Surplus off Gore Avenue. That was where
        Novices in Orlando/ Winter Park Florida lived. Or skipped
        school to hang out. Radio delinquents were we.

        Regarding chassis and front panels, one of the more popular
        building materials during the depression was Masonite. One
        such type was "Tempered Double Sided". This board is still
        commonly found on clip-boards. It is amazingly dense, and has
        very nearly the consistency of Bakelite. Only it's far, far
        easier to drill. Tempered Masonite was featured as a building
        surface (or deck) in construction projects all the way up into
        the 1950s, well after aluminium came into popular use and the
        old fashioned Piney Board was used for the most simple of
        elementary projects. (I say this fully understanding that the
        infamous "R-9" twin 810 transmitter was build upon a "Piney
        Board" well into the 1950s and was anything but simple!)

        One way of using Masonite is in concert with a sheet of metal,
        like an aluminium kick-panel, or even a large sheet of single
        or double copper clad PC board to serve as a common ground.
        The metal sheet is screwed to the underside of the masonite.
        In the '30s, a sheet of aluminium was used. Tube sockets were
        surfaced mounted just as normal for wood breadboards. But using
        this method permitted the builder to simply drop a ground buss
        beneath the chassis via s simple hole conveniently drilled.
        Parts that would benefit from some shielding could be mounted
        below deck and create more space on topside. Many a 5-meter
        rig was built this way. My '30 and '27 based TRFs used a version
        of this method because at 16 years old with yard mowing money,
        a Bud chassis cost what I could get a six-pack of JAN 807s for.

        The same technique can be used for a shielded front panel.
        Masonite takes Wrinkle Finish paint nicely for that 1920's
        Leeds Northrup look, or just plain satin-gloss black Oil Based
        Rustoleum for a convincing Bakelite look. Oh, and between the
        oil in the Masonite and the Oil in the Rustoleum, you have a
        very well sealed board. I have printer's type cases that are
        over 70 years old made entirely from Masonite which outlived
        their wooden counterparts! In both my former Radio Shack in
        in my current Letterpress Shop/ Design Studio, Masonite rules!

        So does heavy iron!

        If it's helpful, I still have some old B&W shots of my early
        Regen and TRF breadboards, one of which was one of my early
        Ham recievers, a simple 6SN7 Twinplex straight from out of
        the 1950 ARRL Handy.

        Some of the finest homebrew wireless projects were, and are,
        built upon non metal surfaces, particularly hardwoods and
        wood products such as described in the above narrative.

        BTW, once you have your twinplex down to perfection - whatever
        that is - all you need to do is place a xtal downconverter in
        front of it and you have a Regenerodyne Superhet! Simple as
        that! Just keep that twinplex tuned between 2 and 3.5 mc.

        You wanna see what can be done with breadboards? Visit what is
        still my all time fav radio site on this planet: Dave Schmarder's
        Homemade Radios at:

        http://www.schmarder.com/radios/index.htm

        Hope this has been helpful (and not too self serving), and as
        always, best of Providence in your homebrew breadboarding
        endeavours!!

        -gary // wd4nka


        --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "kyoritsu" <rikkyograsing@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Jeramy,
        >
        > Some thoughts on chassis construction. I also don't like working with metal. But wood's OK, right?
        >
        > For the chassis top, I use thin plywood, 3/16ths or so. When glued and screwed/nailed to two upright pieces of 2X4, it's sturdy, easy to drill tube sockets holes in, and not too thick to get in the way. I've also seen stiff plastic, about 1/8 inch, intended to be used as a cutting board: this might good for the chassis top in place of the plywood. Saw it at a 100 yen ($1.00) shop. Of course, with wood or plastic, you'll have to use a ground buss or single point grounding, which is actually a good thing for regens and audio amps.
        >
        > If you make the chassis about 2 inches high, you'll be able to put large knobs on the tuning capacitors and get a 'vernier' effect. I use a 4 inch clear plastic disk with a small knob glued to the center. The small knob provides a way to mount it on the capacitor shaft, but of course I use the wide plastic disk for tuning. A protractor gives me a logging scale.
        >
        >
        > For the front panel, I use another piece of thin plywood (a nicer piece of plywood veneer) with thin aluminum sheeting glued to it; the aluminum can even be foil wrap if you handle it carefully. This should be electrically connected to the ground buss.
        >
        >
        > For a good, basic twin triode design, go to Gary's site:
        >
        > http://www.qsl.net/wd4nka/TEXTS/1948Rf.HTM
        >
        > I made a variation of this circuit and it was the first radio I've ever built that worked the first time!
        >
        > Good luck
        >
        > Rob
        >
        >
        > --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "Jeramy A. Ross" <w5xtl@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello all,
        > >
        > > My name is Jeramy, and I've been tinkering in radio for a couple
        > > decades now. I've always had a admiration for regens, but up until now
        > > my sole experience with them have been that obtained through building
        > > various kits. With the Fall/Winter seasons approaching, I feel it's
        > > time for me to step up to gathering parts and building my first one
        > > from scratch. There is where my question comes in. There are
        > > literally tons of circuits out there. My desires in my first project
        > > are as follows:
        > >
        > > 1) 1 to 2 tube circuit.
        > > 2) Covering from the MW BC band thru at least 15MHz or so
        > > preferably with plug-in coils. Not up to fancy band switching
        > > schemes yet.
        > > 3) Breadboard-able... My metal working skills are sub-par at
        > > best... A nice plank of wood suits me much better.
        > >
        > > So.. with that in mind, any suggestions out there?
        > >
        > > Thank you in advance,
        > > Jeramy/W5XTL
        > >
        >
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