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RE: [regenrx] Re: Chassis and metal work ideas..radio on the cheap... feel free to add your own.

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  • dx11
    And not to forget those beautiful metal boxes that sit around CR-Rom drives. Anyone with a career as PC owner must have a load of these. The setback is that
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
      And not to forget those beautiful metal boxes that sit around CR-Rom drives.
      Anyone with a career as PC owner must have a load of these. The setback is
      that one has to make a front for them after removal of the drive and
      electronics. The nice thing is the standard elegant size and the standard
      mounting points. The lend themselves very well for a modular system.

      Cor Beijersbergen
      ---------------------------------------------------------------

      I'm surprised nobody mentioned the repurposing of all those burned out,
      computer supply boxes. People will almost pay you to take them away. Snag
      the old computer case too and hack it to pieces for the heavy sheet metal.
      Mixes of baking pans, cut up cookie sheets, computer power supply boxes,
      pieces of wood and angle can all conspire to make some decent chassis and
      cabinets. I've used the thin aluminum foil for shielding before but I find
      it isn't very durable. Much more robust (and free with purchase of supper)
      is the heavier aluminum that frozen pot pies, lasgana, etc come in. The food
      residue washes right off. It's thick enough to be really sturdy as
      behind-the-panel shielding and thin enough to easily bend and form with your
      fingers.

      73,

      Bill KU8H
    • dayleedwards88
      Gary, that reminds me of something I had completely forgotten. There was a guy back when I was a teenager, he built all his stuff modular style onto Canadian
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
        Gary, that reminds me of something I had completely forgotten. There was a guy back when I was a teenager, he built all his stuff modular style onto Canadian herring and Sardine cans. Everything was soldered to the can....not a nut or bolt in sight.. you know, these oval and rectangular ones, and they looked really good. I couldnt help but look in our local supermarket today while shopping, these cans are exactly the same. An Irish herring in tomato sauce will get you a chassis for a two valver, room for the output transformer will be a challenge. A Canadian Brunswik sardines in olive oil will do a decent single valve audio amp, and, wait for it, a large sized Aulsbrookes coffee cream selection will do a 4 valved superhet with a fully enclosed sheilded base!! And you have something to snack on while building progresses.
      • Gary
        These would be especially good for the smaller valves, the 7 and 9 pin minis , as I call them. We have also breath tins and the like. Your description reminds
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
          These would be especially good for the smaller valves, the 7 and 9 pin "minis", as I call them.

          We have also breath tins and the like.

          Your description reminds me of the Herring Can rigs that made their appearance in Amateur Radio publications in the very late 1960s and early 70s, albeit they being solid state devices . . . 2n2222 and 2n3904 type rigs, I must remind myself that we are as far away in time from those devices as I was from the first KDKA broadcast when I built my first '76 regen! Hard for me to view them through the same set of spectacles as I viewed the '28 Bearcat Screen Grid Receiver in 1974! :)

          Ouch. Time marches on.

          --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "dayleedwards88" <dayleedwards@...> wrote:
          >
          > Gary, that reminds me of something I had completely forgotten. There was a guy back when I was a teenager, he built all his stuff modular style onto Canadian herring and Sardine cans. Everything was soldered to the can....not a nut or bolt in sight.. you know, these oval and rectangular ones, and they looked really good. I couldnt help but look in our local supermarket today while shopping, these cans are exactly the same. An Irish herring in tomato sauce will get you a chassis for a two valver, room for the output transformer will be a challenge. A Canadian Brunswik sardines in olive oil will do a decent single valve audio amp, and, wait for it, a large sized Aulsbrookes coffee cream selection will do a 4 valved superhet with a fully enclosed sheilded base!! And you have something to snack on while building progresses.
          >
        • Bill Cromwell
          ... That exact same thing can be done with all metal. The angle stock can be mitre cut on the top surface at the corners and fastened at the joint when bent
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
            On Mon, 2012-10-01 at 05:46 +0000, Gary wrote:
            ---snip---
            >
            > Back in the late 40s and early 50s, there was run in QST and in the
            > handbooks of this era a series of articles involving the use of the
            > Slat
            > Board chassis.

            ---snip---

            That exact same thing can be done with all metal. The angle stock can be
            mitre cut on the top surface at the corners and fastened at the joint
            when bent into a square or rectangular frame. Then a sheet can be
            fastened on the top to form a metal box chassis. It turns out neater
            with less skill than using a brake to fold it from sheet metal.

            Angle or box channel can also be substituted for the two pieces of wood.
            I like to have some wood in some projects. The wood just makes it feel
            "warmer". Especially so if the "cabinet" is the wooden part. Ugly, cold
            metal shielding hidden behind the wood.

            73,

            Bill KU8H
          • Gary
            Good stuff, Bill! Wood can also serve as a sort of insulation at lower potentials and lower currents. The sort of voltages one would typically use Fahnestock
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
              Good stuff, Bill!

              Wood can also serve as a sort of insulation at lower potentials and lower currents. The sort of voltages one would typically use Fahnestock clips with, which is why I prefer the wooden end blocks, but certainly, completely metal chassis and boxes can be created. In fact, square channeling alone can be used for narrow strip work. I've used that for transistor projects needing separate circuit boxes.

              -gary // wd4nka

              --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Mon, 2012-10-01 at 05:46 +0000, Gary wrote:
              > ---snip---
              > >
              > > Back in the late 40s and early 50s, there was run in QST and in the
              > > handbooks of this era a series of articles involving the use of the
              > > Slat
              > > Board chassis.
              >
              > ---snip---
              >
              > That exact same thing can be done with all metal. The angle stock can be
              > mitre cut on the top surface at the corners and fastened at the joint
              > when bent into a square or rectangular frame. Then a sheet can be
              > fastened on the top to form a metal box chassis. It turns out neater
              > with less skill than using a brake to fold it from sheet metal.
              >
              > Angle or box channel can also be substituted for the two pieces of wood.
              > I like to have some wood in some projects. The wood just makes it feel
              > "warmer". Especially so if the "cabinet" is the wooden part. Ugly, cold
              > metal shielding hidden behind the wood.
              >
              > 73,
              >
              > Bill KU8H
              >
            • Bill Cromwell
              ... Hi, I recall seeing some projects built on/in the metal junction boxes that are used for mounting light switches, outlets, and light fixtures in house
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 1, 2012
                On Mon, 2012-10-01 at 15:21 +0000, Gary wrote:
                >
                > Good stuff, Bill!
                >
                > Wood can also serve as a sort of insulation at lower potentials and
                > lower currents. The sort of voltages one would typically use
                > Fahnestock clips with, which is why I prefer the wooden end blocks,
                > but certainly, completely metal chassis and boxes can be created. In
                > fact, square channeling alone can be used for narrow strip work. I've
                > used that for transistor projects needing separate circuit boxes.
                >
                > -gary // wd4nka
                >


                Hi,

                I recall seeing some projects built on/in the metal junction boxes that
                are used for mounting light switches, outlets, and light fixtures in
                house wiring. Those might make good sub-chassis in larger tube projects
                and even complete cabinets for transistor radios. Available at hardware
                and home improvement "box" stores everywhere. Hide some of those behind
                that pretty wood panel :)

                73,

                Bill KU8H
              • astro boy
                Hi Bill. Just wondering if you could post a pick or two .. A pickie is worth a thousand words kind of thingy  :) ...  Cheers.
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 2, 2012
                  Hi Bill.

                  Just wondering if you could post a pick or two ..

                  A pickie is worth a thousand words kind of thingy  :)

                  ...  Cheers.



                  ________________________________
                  From: Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...>
                  To: regenrx@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, 2 October 2012 12:25 AM
                  Subject: Re: [regenrx] Re: Chassis and metal work ideas..radio on the cheap... feel free to add your own.


                   
                  On Mon, 2012-10-01 at 05:46 +0000, Gary wrote:
                  ---snip---
                  >
                  > Back in the late 40s and early 50s, there was run in QST and in the
                  > handbooks of this era a series of articles involving the use of the
                  > Slat
                  > Board chassis.

                  ---snip---

                  That exact same thing can be done with all metal. The angle stock can be
                  mitre cut on the top surface at the corners and fastened at the joint
                  when bent into a square or rectangular frame. Then a sheet can be
                  fastened on the top to form a metal box chassis. It turns out neater
                  with less skill than using a brake to fold it from sheet metal.

                  Angle or box channel can also be substituted for the two pieces of wood.
                  I like to have some wood in some projects. The wood just makes it feel
                  "warmer". Especially so if the "cabinet" is the wooden part. Ugly, cold
                  metal shielding hidden behind the wood.

                  73,

                  Bill KU8H




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Bill Cromwell
                  ... Hi, Well that s a sore spot for me. I don t have a decent camera for that. I have tried taking pictures for eBay a while back and you just can t see any
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 2, 2012
                    On Tue, 2012-10-02 at 06:26 -0700, astro boy wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Bill.
                    >
                    > Just wondering if you could post a pick or two ..
                    >
                    > A pickie is worth a thousand words kind of thingy :)
                    >
                    > ... Cheers.
                    >

                    Hi,


                    Well that's a sore spot for me. I don't have a decent camera for that. I
                    have tried taking pictures for eBay a while back and you just can't see
                    any real detail. I'm saving up for one. I intend do do just that..post
                    pictures. Does anybody have details about how to homebrew a digital SLR
                    camera? One using vacuum tubes would be ideal! <evil grin>

                    73,

                    Bill KU8H
                  • davidpnewkirk
                    ... I do most of my experimentation in cookie tins augmented by International Coffees tins and the occasional mogrel gift or Twinings tea canister. And more
                    Message 9 of 18 , Oct 2, 2012
                      --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, "dayleedwards88" <dayleedwards@...> wrote:

                      > Gary, that reminds me of something I had completely forgotten. There was a guy back when I was a teenager, he built all his stuff modular style onto Canadian herring and Sardine cans. Everything was soldered to the can....not a nut or bolt in sight.. you know, these oval and rectangular ones, and they looked really good. I couldnt help but look in our local supermarket today while shopping, these cans are exactly the same. An Irish herring in tomato sauce will get you a chassis for a two valver, room for the output transformer will be a challenge. A Canadian Brunswik sardines in olive oil will do a decent single valve audio amp, and, wait for it, a large sized Aulsbrookes coffee cream selection will do a 4 valved superhet with a fully enclosed sheilded base!! And you have something to snack on while building progresses.

                      I do most of my experimentation in cookie tins augmented by International Coffees tins and the occasional mogrel gift or Twinings tea canister.

                      And more than experimentation: My go-to central ham equipment, a transmitter-receiver construction I call the Summer 40 Winter 80, is built in an approx 8 x 10 x 2-inch cookie tin with two International Coffee tins soldered on top. Together they house a bandswitched 80- and 40-meter transmitter (6BN11 pentode crystal oscillator or amp; 6BN11 pentode driver; 6JB5 or 10JA5, at first 1631, final amplifier) and an NE602-based direct-conversion receiver minus local oscillator, which is built in an outboard box bought at a hamfest. The International Coffees tins house the 6JB5's output network (input C and inductors in one and output C in the other). A skinny Wrigley's Gum gift tin, beside the S40W80 on a power umbilical, houses a switchable NE602-based 40-meter converter (10.695-MHz crystal). Outboard passive UTC low-pass audio filters (you can buy a 1-kHz version from Surplus Sales [see the LMI-1000 way down in the lower right at http://www.surplussales.com/Filters/Filters-1.html, and I think a guy is still selling some LMI-500s on Ebay (search for UTC filter)]) mounted in either a flat Christmas gift-card can or (as part of a 12JN8-12A6 amplifier unit) in a pencil tin), aided by a stage or two of op-amp-based AF peak and low-pass filtering, give me communications-class selectivity and shave off high-end hiss from the set's AF stages. (No, this selectivity is not single-signal; I find SS selectivity to be largely unnecessary as the ham population declines.)

                      Another toggle switch turns the S40W80's crystal-oscillator stage into a grounded-grid amplifier that can be cathode driven from a solid-state outboard VFO built into an ARC-5 transmitter hulk (which also houses a 280-V supply for the S40W80 transmitter) or my oft-used Crystalizer ( http://mysite.verizon.net/dpnewkirk/ej/crystalizer/), which is built into the case from a failed computer power supply (topped by an International Coffee tin housing switching bandpass filters).

                      Another computer power supply case houses a one-tube crystal-oscillator transmitter that has multiple sockets and heater-voltage switching so it can take 6AQ5/12AQ5, 5763/6417, and 6BW6 tubes.

                      An alternative power supply for the S40W80, the one-tube oscillator transmitter, and other transmitters is built into two 5-inch diameter butter cookie tins connected together by multiple Molex-connectored umbilicals. This supply puts put about 320 V at the key-down current level demanded by the S40W80 transmitter; the S40W80 which puts out 7 to 12 W depending on the band and power supply used.

                      Which power I have kept rediscovering since my teens is all I need to experience the transmitting side of radio's magic and fun.

                      My dummy antennas are built into International Coffee (6 W load with RF peak voltmeter) and Snickers "tradition" (50 W load with RF peak voltmeter) tins.

                      The power-MOSFET keyer I use to cathode key my various transmitters (separate IRF840s for driver and final stages) is also built into a gift tin.

                      My BG-3 band-imaging receiver, now dismantled to be rebuilt into modular form in pencil and other tins, was built in a cookie tin with another, taller cookie tin soldered on top.

                      Yes, I take tins seriously. No, they're not good for anything that requires mechanical rigidity, like VFOs. Yes, I chuckle when I see folks fastidiously mounting circuit boards inside Altoids tins when all of those parts could have been soldered directly to the enclosure ugly/ground-plane/dead-bug style.

                      Some tins have a clear or tinted coating you must scrape away before you can solder to them. Tins are steel at base and will kill the Q of solenoidal coils unless such coils are kept at least a diameter away from the tin; I use toroidal inductors, and so this aspect of steel doesn't bother me. No, the steel of tins doesn't really give any greater protection against ac hum than, say, aluminum, as steel's initial permeability is too high for it to offer much magnetic shielding--sez Terman in _Measurements in Radio Engineering_.

                      My father, Rod Newkirk, W9BRD, taught me how to build in tins; when I was growing up, his main receiver was an 80- or 160-meter regen topped by a converter--"topped" because it was built in coffee cans with those tight-fitting lids you initially opened with the help of a spot-welded-on key. The converter he'd built for my uncle, Phil Simmons, the first W9VES, to soup up his Hallicrafters SX-24 receiver, was based on two Prince Albert tobacco tins side by side like bongos; he also had a 2-W two-6U8s 160-meter transmitter built into a similarly bongolike pair of half-pound coffee cans.

                      Oh, and as for AF output transformers: No need to have a transformer installed in every receiver when you only use one receiver at a time, so I mounted my key AF output transformer (which provides a 7-kilohm load for a 12A6 from 8 or 500 ohms for speaker or headphones and sounds lovely on Morse and voice with modern phones) in an International Coffees tin, equipping this module and its associated equipment with Molex connectors so I can connect the transformer only to the receiver I'm actually using at a given time.

                      Best regards,

                      Dave
                      amateur radio W9VES
                      where the other op's equipment enclosures all look the same on my end
                    • Kirk Kleinschmidt
                      Ahh... I was hoping Dave would chime in!  :)  I ve seen several of his re-purposed chassis back in the day and, being an essential scavenger, always
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 2, 2012
                        Ahh... I was hoping Dave would chime in!  :)  I've seen several of his "re-purposed" chassis back in the day and, being an essential scavenger, always admired his work.

                        As for me, I have the horrible habit of building radios in the unfortunately gutted carcasses of classic radios that should have remained intact...

                        If I only had *all of the radios* I was given as a teenage ham (and subsequently scavenged) I could retire (for real this time)!

                        Right in front of me sits an 80/40 6146B TX built inside a used-to-be-fine Heathkit AT-1 cabinet and chassis (which was itself a tube TX).

                        A sad state of affairs!

                        --Kirk, NT0Z

                        P.S. Several online vendors sell a huge variety of naked, paint-free tins at surprisingly affordable prices...and thrift stores such as Salvation Army, Savers, Goodwill, etc, have bazillions of tins for 25 cents to a buck each. This is where I find recipe card boxes with hinged lids made in the '40s through the '70s, when they were made from beefy materials, etc, and not flimsy junk. Someday I may actually build a radio or two inside one!


                        My book, "Stealth Amateur Radio," is now available from
                        www.stealthamateur.com and on the Amazon Kindle (soon)




                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • astro boy
                        Its ok Bill ,,,   Heeeeee,,,     Im sure ul get there  ..... I do like the idea of building on the cheap Its the finish that counts really ,, An mostly
                        Message 11 of 18 , Oct 3, 2012
                          Its ok Bill ,,,   Heeeeee,,,    

                          Im sure ul get there  .....

                          I do like the idea of building on the cheap

                          Its the finish that counts really ,,

                          An mostly that takes a lil  time and invention

                          an not a lot of money,,, thank goodness ....


                          Cheers...


                          ________________________________
                          From: Bill Cromwell <wrcromwell@...>
                          To: regenrx@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wednesday, 3 October 2012 12:34 AM
                          Subject: Re: [regenrx] Re: Chassis and metal work ideas..cams n pics


                           
                          On Tue, 2012-10-02 at 06:26 -0700, astro boy wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi Bill.
                          >
                          > Just wondering if you could post a pick or two ..
                          >
                          > A pickie is worth a thousand words kind of thingy :)
                          >
                          > ... Cheers.
                          >

                          Hi,

                          Well that's a sore spot for me. I don't have a decent camera for that. I
                          have tried taking pictures for eBay a while back and you just can't see
                          any real detail. I'm saving up for one. I intend do do just that..post
                          pictures. Does anybody have details about how to homebrew a digital SLR
                          camera? One using vacuum tubes would be ideal! <evil grin>

                          73,

                          Bill KU8H




                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Gary
                          Another great source is can be old test equipment, in particular, a lot of the old Eico stuff. Hopelessly trashed VTVMs, &c. My last Novice Special was built
                          Message 12 of 18 , Oct 4, 2012
                            Another great source is can be old test equipment, in particular, a lot of the old Eico stuff. Hopelessly trashed VTVMs, &c. My last Novice Special was built in some old piece of test equipment's cabinet - gosh, I even forgot what it originally was - but dang, when it was done and painted, golly, it reminded me of a cross between a Johnson and some Hallicrafter thing. Never toss out anything that is metal and square, I say!

                            Speaking of old test equipment, that's also a great source for old visual indicator cathode ray valves of the 6E5 or 6W5 ilk, for next to nothing.

                            One of these days, I'll find some kind soul with a Linotype and a lot of time on their hands to set a genuine 1929-style pamphlet stuffed with "Radio on the Cheap" ideas. Maybe even some ROC circuits to stuff some of these oddball boxes with. Heh, a homebrew publication for homebrew radio. Imagine. :)

                            -gary // wd4nka

                            --- In regenrx@yahoogroups.com, Kirk Kleinschmidt <sohosources@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Ahh... I was hoping Dave would chime in!  :)  I've seen several of his "re-purposed" chassis back in the day and, being an essential scavenger, always admired his work.
                            >
                            > As for me, I have the horrible habit of building radios in the unfortunately gutted carcasses of classic radios that should have remained intact...
                            >
                            > If I only had *all of the radios* I was given as a teenage ham (and subsequently scavenged) I could retire (for real this time)!
                            >
                            > Right in front of me sits an 80/40 6146B TX built inside a used-to-be-fine Heathkit AT-1 cabinet and chassis (which was itself a tube TX).
                            >
                            > A sad state of affairs!
                            >
                            > --Kirk, NT0Z
                            >
                            > P.S. Several online vendors sell a huge variety of naked, paint-free tins at surprisingly affordable prices...and thrift stores such as Salvation Army, Savers, Goodwill, etc, have bazillions of tins for 25 cents to a buck each. This is where I find recipe card boxes with hinged lids made in the '40s through the '70s, when they were made from beefy materials, etc, and not flimsy junk. Someday I may actually build a radio or two inside one!
                            >
                            >
                            > My book, "Stealth Amateur Radio," is now available from
                            > www.stealthamateur.com and on the Amazon Kindle (soon)
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
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