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Is there any Linux base OpenSource tool available for Redhat which can monitor

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  • tux.ambarish
    Is there any Linux base OpenSource tool available for Redhat which can monitor Disk Space utilization of Windows 2003 Severs Via SNMP Or is there any
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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      Is there any Linux base OpenSource tool available for Redhat which can
      monitor Disk Space utilization of Windows 2003 Severs Via SNMP

      Or is there any OpenSoruce Application available through which we can
      monitor Windows Machines





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Scott
      ... Yes, you can use Nagios. It can be tricky and its documentation is as good as most Linux documentation, i.e., pretty poor. However, Max Hetrick has some
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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        On Tue, Mar 09, 2010 at 03:00:04PM -0000, tux.ambarish wrote:
        >
        > Is there any Linux base OpenSource tool available for Redhat which can
        > monitor Disk Space utilization of Windows 2003 Severs Via SNMP
        >
        > Or is there any OpenSoruce Application available through which we can
        > monitor Windows Machines

        Yes, you can use Nagios. It can be tricky and its documentation is as
        good as most Linux documentation, i.e., pretty poor.

        However, Max Hetrick has some excellent pages on it. Some of the CentOS
        documentation team felt his article gave too much information--I am not
        kidding. They felt it would be better for the wiki article to simply
        cover installing it on CentOS, and should stop there, leaving its
        configuration as an exercise for the reader.

        Which helps explain why most Linux documentation is so bad. :)

        Anyway, Max's pages are at
        http://www.maxsworld.org/index.php/how-tos/nagios

        There's a link to the nrpe article (which you'll use for Windows) on the
        right.


        --
        Scott Robbins
        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Xander: How could you let her go?
        Giles: As the soon-to-be-purple area on my jaw will attest,
        I did not 'let' her go.
      • Sheryl
        ... For monitoring disk space via SNMP nrpe is unnecessary. Just make sure SNMP is set up on the MS machine and get check_snmp_disk.pl plugin from
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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          > On Tue, Mar 09, 2010 at 03:00:04PM -0000, tux.ambarish wrote:
          >>
          >> Is there any Linux base OpenSource tool available for Redhat which can
          >> monitor Disk Space utilization of Windows 2003 Severs Via SNMP
          >>
          >> Or is there any OpenSoruce Application available through which we can
          >> monitor Windows Machines
          >
          > Yes, you can use Nagios. It can be tricky and its documentation is as
          > good as most Linux documentation, i.e., pretty poor.
          >
          > [snip]
          >
          > There's a link to the nrpe article (which you'll use for Windows) on the
          > right.

          For monitoring disk space via SNMP nrpe is unnecessary. Just make sure
          SNMP is set up on the MS machine and get check_snmp_disk.pl plugin from
          NagiosExchange. There also are plugins available to check memory and CPU
          utilization. The biggest negative I found was that there are multiple
          options and some work better than others for different situations.

          Another alternative would be the community version of zenoss, which is
          SNMP-oriented and also can use nagios plugins. It's got more of the
          "dashboard" look, which appeals to some people.

          Sheryl
        • J
          ... Oddly enough, Nagios is so popular, and also as Scott mentioned, so confusing to set up, there are books on just that one tool Like this one from my
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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            On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 13:47, Sheryl <gubydala@...> wrote:

            > For monitoring disk space via SNMP nrpe is unnecessary.  Just make sure
            > SNMP is set up on the MS machine and get check_snmp_disk.pl plugin from
            > NagiosExchange.  There also are plugins available to check memory and CPU
            > utilization.  The biggest negative I found was that there are multiple
            > options and some work better than others for different situations.

            Oddly enough, Nagios is so popular, and also as Scott mentioned, so
            confusing to set up, there are books on just that one tool

            Like this one from my favorite tech book publisher:
            http://oreilly.com/catalog/9781593270704

            and here's a whole list of them:
            http://www.nagios.org/about/propaganda/books

            Not all in English either...

            I had a headache for days the first time I tried setting up Nagios,
            however, once I had it figured out, everything fell into place, and
            setting up all the modules and configs on each of my systems was
            fairly easy. However, SNMP is still the bane of my Administrator
            career... ugh... how I loath SNMP traps...

            Thankfully, I don't have to worry about them any more ;-)

            Good luck
            Jeff
          • Scott
            ... Yeah, I almost ordered one till I found Max s article. The aggravating thing is that it isn t even that hard--it s just that the documentation is sooooo
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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              On Tue, Mar 09, 2010 at 09:25:21PM -0500, J wrote:
              > On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 13:47, Sheryl <gubydala@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Oddly enough, Nagios is so popular, and also as Scott mentioned, so
              > confusing to set up, there are books on just that one tool
              >
              > Like this one from my favorite tech book publisher:
              > http://oreilly.com/catalog/9781593270704
              >
              > and here's a whole list of them:
              > http://www.nagios.org/about/propaganda/books

              Yeah, I almost ordered one till I found Max's article. The aggravating
              thing is that it isn't even that hard--it's just that the documentation
              is sooooo bad.
              >


              --
              Scott Robbins
              PGP keyID EB3467D6
              ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 EB34 67D6 )
              gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

              Giles: I suspect your mother would want to... put it on the
              refrigerator.
              Buffy: Yeah. She saw these scores and her head spun around and
              exploded.
              Giles: I've been on the Hellmouth too long, that was metaphorical,
              yes?
              Buffy: Yes.
            • J
              ... Yeah... I don t think Max s article even existed when I was messing with Nagios back in the day... but I did find a similar site that was what I used to
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 9, 2010
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                On Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 21:37, Scott <scottro@...> wrote:
                > Yeah, I almost ordered one till I found Max's article.  The aggravating
                > thing is that it isn't even that hard--it's just that the documentation
                > is sooooo bad.

                Yeah... I don't think Max's article even existed when I was messing
                with Nagios back in the day... but I did find a similar site that was
                what I used to get it sorted out back then.

                And yeah, most of the Nagios documentation reminded me a lot of one of
                those bloody jigsaw puzzles that have pictures printed on both
                sides...
              • Sheryl
                ... Sure, but you ll find that with a lot of tools and not all of them open source. Look at how many books there are about any given Adobe product, for
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 10, 2010
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                  Jeff wrote:

                  > Oddly enough, Nagios is so popular, and also as Scott mentioned, so
                  > confusing to set up, there are books on just that one tool

                  Sure, but you'll find that with a lot of tools and not all of them open
                  source. Look at how many books there are about any given Adobe product,
                  for instance. Or Powerpoint.

                  And that's even given that companies like Adobe and Microsoft have plenty
                  of resources (thanks to sales) to throw professional writers at the
                  problem. In the Open Source world, documentation writers are volunteers
                  and almost always the code writers. Code skills don't always mean writing
                  skills, plus (speaking from my own experience) people get too close to
                  their own code and have trouble sometimes stepping back enough to write
                  for a person who isn't as familiar. *NIX documentation has been
                  criticized for decades as being too terse -- it's a reminder of syntax for
                  people who already know the tools and haven't used them in a little while.

                  *NIX systems and tools of any complexity also provide a multitude of ways
                  to accomplish any single task -- for instance, I think there are 2 or 3
                  ways to install NRPE support on Microsoft systems but then you also can do
                  SNMP monitoring of Microsoft systems without NRPE. That makes it hard as
                  well. And since add-ons are donated by volunteers, sometimes there are
                  half a dozen "me too" variations on one theme instead of the one option
                  designed by committee that you're likely to find with commercial software.

                  > I had a headache for days the first time I tried setting up Nagios,
                  > however, once I had it figured out, everything fell into place, and
                  > setting up all the modules and configs on each of my systems was
                  > fairly easy. However, SNMP is still the bane of my Administrator
                  > career... ugh... how I loath SNMP traps...

                  I never had to do that. SNMP polling was bad enough (I couldn't figure
                  out how to SNMP walk the HP MIBs after I installed hpasm. Talk about
                  documentation issues.).

                  > Thankfully, I don't have to worry about them any more ;-)

                  My workplace is moving to SolarWinds and I'm in the process of phasing out
                  the Nagios system I took over and expanded over 2 years ago. So I'll be
                  in the same position soon. I won't miss the monitoring work all that much
                  but I hate that Nagios is being replaced with a much more expensive and
                  less functional (IMNSHO of course) alternative.

                  Sheryl

                  > Good luck
                  > Jeff
                  >
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