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Re: [redhat] Problem using 2 NICs in a single Red Hat box

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  • Jeff Lane
    ... On the one hand, I would call BS on whomever told you that it was impossible to use to NICs of same make and model in the machine. If that were the case,
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 11, 2006
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      On 12/11/06, wires8 <wires8@...> wrote:

      > Hello. I'm having trouble with a personal project that I'm working
      > on. I'm trying to set up a PC with 2 NICs so I can segregate my
      > network. I have a bare-bones Red Hat 9 install running with,
      > originally, a single NIC. That works fine. I can connect to the
      > Internet without problems. I added a second NIC and Red Hat picked up
      > the new hardware and I walked through its configuration. The trouble
      > is that both the lights on the brand new NIC are dark. Both the NICs
      > are Linksys 10/100 LNE100TX cards. I've read some FAQs and HOWTOs on

      On the one hand, I would call BS on whomever told you that it was
      impossible to use to NICs of same make and model in the machine. If
      that were the case, there are a LOT of servers out there that would be
      in trouble (every single machine I have here at work has two onboards
      with identical chipsets, all made by either Intel or Broadcom).

      Oh the other hand, however, it CAN be a problem SOMETIMES. However,
      you are using pretty generic stuff... LNE100s have been around for
      quite a while and I dont recall seeing any issues like that recently.

      So first of all, I would say that trying a different brand of NIC
      would be beneficial, if to do nothing else but rule out A: bad
      hardware, B: bad cables, C: some weird hardware collision.

      You say the lights on the 2nd NIC are dark. That to me says you
      either have no cable plugged in, a bad cable, an incorrect cable
      (using a rollover cable instead of a straight cable), bad port on the
      hub or switch you are connected to, or something physical.

      Have you tried removing the one good NIC and using just the new bad
      NIC to see what happens?
      Tried cable swaps? (Rule number 1 networking club is Check your
      cables. Rule number 2 of networking club is check your cables. If
      this is your first networking club, you must check your cables)
      Tried different ports on the hub or switch, or a different hub or
      switch all together?

      After that, you can do some things like stop all network services,
      open a console and do a tail -f on /var/log/messages remove the driver
      for those cards (dont remember offhand what the LNE100 driver is) then
      manually insert the driver again via modprobe and see if anything
      unseemly pops up in messages, or in in the ring buffer (do a dmesg to
      see its output).

      At the very least, those should give you clues as to what is going on.
      Right now, I am betting on hardware issues more than I am driver
      issues, because you have a pretty common setup there. However, you
      DID say that you are using Red Hat 9, and I am not completely familiar
      with it. I kinda skipped over 9 and went from 8 to RHEL 2.1 and
      beyond, and there was some SuSE and other distros in between. But I
      haven't seen issues like what you are mentioning in a very long time
      (at least not ones that really were related to similar chipsets).

      HTH
      Jeff






      --
      ------------------> Jeffrey Lane - W4KDH <-------------------
      www.jefflane.org
      Another cog in the great
      Corporate Wheel

      The internet has no government, no constitution, no laws, no
      rights, no police, no courts. Don't talk about fairness or
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      talk about what is being done and what will be done by the
      amorphous unreachable undefinable blob called "the internet
      user base." -Paul Vixie
    • Michael Schwendt
      ... Notice there are also 8 carrier errors and no transfer at all.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 12, 2006
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        On 11/12/06, wires8 wrote:
        > Hello. I'm having trouble with a personal project that I'm working
        > on. I'm trying to set up a PC with 2 NICs so I can segregate my
        > network. I have a bare-bones Red Hat 9 install running with,
        > originally, a single NIC. That works fine. I can connect to the
        > Internet without problems. I added a second NIC and Red Hat picked up
        > the new hardware and I walked through its configuration. The trouble
        > is that both the lights on the brand new NIC are dark. Both the NICs
        > are Linksys 10/100 LNE100TX cards. I've read some FAQs and HOWTOs on
        > the subject and one of them said that 2 NICs from the same
        > manufacturer can't used because they both use the same chip set or the
        > same driver. It wasn't clear if it's impossible or just a setup issue.
        > I don't have a non-Linksys NIC to put into the box to see if it will
        > work but I will spring for one if someone can tell me what's going on
        > and why 2 NICs from the same manufacturer can't be used together. As
        > far as my limited understanding goes, it looks like the card should be
        > working. Hopefully it's a configuration issue that can be fixed with
        > the hardware I have. Thanks in advance. Here are the details on what
        > I know about my setup:
        >
        >
        > When Red Hat starts the following is displayed:
        > Bringing up Interface eth0 [OK]
        > Bringing up Interface eth1 [OK]
        >
        > From the machine itself I can sucessfully ping the IP address of the
        > new card.
        >
        > In the Network Configuration tool both eth0 and eth1 are active
        > eth0 (connected to my Internet facing router) has a static IP address
        > of 192.168.1.2, a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, and gateway address
        > 192.168.1.1 (the router's address)
        > eth1 has a static IP address of 192.168.2.100 a subnet mask of
        > 255.255.255.0
        >
        >
        >
        > Output from ifconfig is:
        > eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:04:5A:61:42:21
        > inet addr:192.168.1.2 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
        > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
        > RX packets:445 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
        > TX packets:339 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
        > collisions:0 txqueuelen:100
        > RX bytes:353525 (345.2 Kb) TX bytes:35455 (34.6 Kb)
        > Interrupt:9 Base address:0x8c00
        >
        > eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:14:BF:5C:9E:8D
        > inet addr:192.168.2.100 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
        > UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
        > RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
        > TX packets:0 errors:4 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:8
        > collisions:0 txqueuelen:100
        > RX bytes:0 (0.0 b) TX bytes:0 (0.0 b)
        > Interrupt:11 Base address:0xa800
        >
        > I see that eth1 has 4 errors but I don't know why

        Notice there are also 8 carrier errors and no transfer at all.
      • Godwin Stewart
        ... Hash: SHA1 On Tue, 12 Dec 2006 14:07:09 +0100, Michael Schwendt ... Bad CAT5 cable maybe? - -- G. Stewart - gstewart@spamcop.net Television -- a medium.
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 12, 2006
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          On Tue, 12 Dec 2006 14:07:09 +0100, "Michael Schwendt"
          <mschwendt@...> wrote:

          > > I see that eth1 has 4 errors but I don't know why
          >
          > Notice there are also 8 carrier errors and no transfer at all.

          Bad CAT5 cable maybe?

          - --
          G. Stewart - gstewart@...

          Television -- a medium. So called because it is neither rare nor
          well done.
          -- Ernie Kovacs
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        • Jeff Lane
          ... That was my guess... bad cable or bad card, which for a cheap LNE100 card would not be out of the realm of possibility. I have gotten plenty of high end
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 12, 2006
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            On 12/12/06, Godwin Stewart <gstewart@...> wrote:

            > Bad CAT5 cable maybe?


            That was my guess... bad cable or bad card, which for a cheap LNE100
            card would not be out of the realm of possibility. I have gotten
            plenty of "high end" NICs in the past, 1GB, 10GB and FC, that had
            cable jacks that were improperly soldered and the intermittant
            connection caused all sorts of hilarity.

            But I would assume a bad cable at first as well.

            Wonder if he'll reply to any of this?
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