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OT - Debian Installation -Moderator approved

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  • deech_99
    Hello all, I have a couple of questions about a Debian installation. Thanks for taking the time to read this: Question 1 ... I am trying to install Woody on a
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
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      Hello all,
      I have a couple of questions about a Debian installation. Thanks for
      taking the time to read this:

      Question 1
      ----------
      I am trying to install Woody on a laptop I just bought but tasksel
      does not work and dselect does not seem to show all my packages.

      I have gone thorough the initial install process (base modules etc)
      and I have rebooted and logged in.

      Since I don't have a network connection from the laptop, I had to add
      my Woody CD's to the sources with: apt-cdrom. Once I did that the CD's
      show ed up in my sources.list.

      However, when I try 'tasksel', it says:
      'No tasks found on this system. Did you update your available file?'

      I then looked at packages available from dselect and it was very sparse.
      apt-cache search seems to show the whole list of packages available.

      What am I doing wrong?

      Question 2
      -----------
      My main goal for installing Woody was to upgrade to Sarge. However, I
      have to do this without an Internet connection(I only have a wireless
      card in my laptop, so I have to install wireless drivers before I can
      download from the Internet). Now that I have a minimal install of
      Woody, what is the best way to get my wireless card (It will work with
      linux-wlang drivers) working and to install Sarge?

      Thanks a lot for your help....
      Deech

      P.S Thanks to Godwin Stewart for letting me post this.
    • Scott
      ... The heck with em, just use apt-get. (I m not a big fan of tasksel and have always been too lazy to learn dselect, so take that with a grain of salt. My
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 4, 2004
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        On Thu, Feb 05, 2004 at 03:43:17AM +0000, deech_99 wrote:
        > Hello all,
        > I have a couple of questions about a Debian installation. Thanks for
        > taking the time to read this:
        >
        > Question 1
        > ----------
        > I am trying to install Woody on a laptop I just bought but tasksel
        > does not work and dselect does not seem to show all my packages.

        The heck with 'em, just use apt-get.

        (I'm not a big fan of tasksel and have always been too lazy to learn
        dselect, so take that with a grain of salt. My aversion to tasksel is
        that it picks a bunch of stuff I don't want.)


        >
        > I then looked at packages available from dselect and it was very sparse.
        > apt-cache search seems to show the whole list of packages available.
        >
        > What am I doing wrong?

        I'm not sure, but I would try, just for giggles, something like apt-get
        install foo (if foo is on the cd) and see what happens.

        >
        > Question 2
        > -----------
        > My main goal for installing Woody was to upgrade to Sarge. However, I
        > have to do this without an Internet connection(I only have a wireless
        > card in my laptop, so I have to install wireless drivers before I can
        > download from the Internet). Now that I have a minimal install of
        > Woody, what is the best way to get my wireless card (It will work with
        > linux-wlang drivers) working and to install Sarge?

        Definitely Sarge and not Sid?

        I would, assuming you have an Internet connection somewhere, get the
        Sarge CD, put it in, change your /etc/apt/source.list to testing and put
        in the CD as source.

        FWIW, I have a little Debian page (though not dealing with any of your
        problems) that gives a quick guide to jigdo among other things.

        Speaking of, I always thought jigdo was simply their way of weeding out
        people who didn't want to read docs. However, when security and non-us
        sources went down, I thought, hrrm, maybe not--it seems that Debian, big
        as it is, was running only one box with security and non us on it. :)


        >
        > Thanks a lot for your help....
        > Deech
        >
        > P.S Thanks to Godwin Stewart for letting me post this.


        Hey, I wrote a nice email about it too, y'know. :)

        (I think Godwin and I co-own this list, which is amusing as neither of
        us are running RH these days--ironically enough, the former list owner,
        Robin, switched from RH to Deb).

        One other possible idea--you might try Arch Linux which (I think) might
        have the wireless drivers. Put it on a small partition, say 900 megs or
        so, then install Deb from that partition with chroot.


        --

        Scott Robbins

        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Cordelia: Oxford. Whoopee. Four years in teabag central.
        Sounds thrilling. And M.I.T. is a clearasil ad with housing, and Yale
        is a dumping ground for those who didn't get into Harvard.
        Willow: I got into Harvard.
      • deech_99
        K The heck with em, just use apt-get. Apt-get does work and when I run aptitude, I am able to select all my available packages. However, I am not all that
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 5, 2004
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          K> The heck with 'em, just use apt-get.
          Apt-get does work and when I run aptitude, I am able to select all my
          available packages.

          However, I am not all that familiar with package names and things like
          that. So I am struggling a bit to figure out what packages I really
          need and what I don't.

          MY other problem is that apparently I chose the wrong video card
          driver during the initial part of my install so I cannot get x windows
          to start. I have an ATI MOBILITY™ RADEON™ 9000 4X AGP 3D Graphics
          Accelerator with 64MB EMBEDDED DDR Memory. I chose the 'ati' driver,
          which seems to give me errors when I try gdm. Does anyone know what
          the right driver for this is?

          Thanks...
          Deech
        • Godwin Stewart
          ... I think you ll find there s also a radeon driver for X. That s more likely to do the trick than a generic ati driver. -- G. Stewart --
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 5, 2004
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            Boring intro to state that "deech_99" <deech_99@...> wrote:

            > I have an ATI MOBILITY™ RADEON™ 9000 4X AGP 3D Graphics
            > Accelerator with 64MB EMBEDDED DDR Memory. I chose the 'ati' driver,
            > which seems to give me errors when I try gdm. Does anyone know what
            > the right driver for this is?

            I think you'll find there's also a "radeon" driver for X. That's more likely
            to do the trick than a generic "ati" driver.

            --
            G. Stewart -- gstewart@... -- gstewart@...
            Registered Linux user #284683 (Slackware 9.0, Linux 2.4.24)
            --------------------------------------------------------------
            Cat, n:
            Lapwarmer with built-in buzzer.
          • Scott
            ... Ok, you can do apt-cache search You can also do apt-get -s install to see what will be installed and see what is recommended.
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 5, 2004
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              On Thu, Feb 05, 2004 at 06:18:18PM +0000, deech_99 wrote:
              > K> The heck with 'em, just use apt-get.
              > Apt-get does work and when I run aptitude, I am able to select all my
              > available packages.
              >
              > However, I am not all that familiar with package names and things like
              > that. So I am struggling a bit to figure out what packages I really
              > need and what I don't.

              Ok, you can do apt-cache search <package name>

              You can also do apt-get -s install <package name> to see what will be
              installed and see what is recommended. (The s is for simulate)

              >
              > MY other problem is that apparently I chose the wrong video card
              > driver during the initial part of my install so I cannot get x windows
              > to start. I have an ATI MOBILITY? RADEON? 9000 4X AGP 3D Graphics
              > Accelerator with 64MB EMBEDDED DDR Memory. I chose the 'ati' driver,
              > which seems to give me errors when I try gdm. Does anyone know what
              > the right driver for this is?

              Hrrm, I have a Rage128 which worked with ATI.

              You could try running xf86config which will give you a wider choice of
              dirvers (I think.)

              Just note that it looks for, assuming you did x-window-system
              XF86Config-4 and xf86config writes to XF86Config


              --

              Scott

              GPG KeyID EB3467D6
              ( 1B848 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6)
              gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

              Ford: I wanna be like you...A vampire.
              Spike: I've known you for two minutes and I can't stand you. I
              don't really feature you living forever. Can I eat him now love?
            • deech_99
              Sarge has been successfully installed onto my laptop and so far its running like a champ. The key to installing Sarge sucessfully for me ( a Debian newbie) was
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 7, 2004
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                Sarge has been successfully installed onto my laptop and so far its
                running like a champ. The key to installing Sarge sucessfully for me (
                a Debian newbie) was to install Mandrake (which automatically detects
                my network cards ) on another partition and use that to remotely
                install Sarge.

                Instructions for remote installation are located at:
                http://trilldev.sourceforge.net/files/remotedeb.html

                If your'e planning to install Debian remotely using this link as a
                manual, please keep the following tips in mind:

                Use Aptitude & Tasksel NOT DSelect (if your'e a beginner as I was)
                ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                DSelect is Debian's package management tool and meant for experts
                only. By experts, I mean people who already know the names of the
                packages they need.

                Tasksel gives you categories of software like "Desktop Environment"
                that you can select, whereas dselect gives you a listing of the
                hundreds of packages in KDE, Gnome etc that you need to wade through.

                Using Aptitude you can do both, select categories and individual packages.

                Debootstrap Screws Up Apt sources.list
                ---------------------------------------------------------
                Apt is a really nice tool that downloads and installs packages onto
                your system. The best part is that, unlike rpm, it figures out the
                dependancies and installs them. Apt uses a file called sources.list in
                /etc/apt that holds the links to the packages for you distribution.
                Unfortunately, the remote install which is supposed to set up that
                file for you screws it up and sticks in 'debootstrap.invalid' as your
                link.
                You must now go and hand-edit this file. Here is what mine looks like:

                deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing main contrib non-free
                deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing main contrib
                deb http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib

                X Server Has Problems Starting
                ---------------------------------------------
                I had lot of problems getting Xserver to start. I could start the
                graphical login screen but whenever I tried to login as a non-root
                user, the screen would blank for a couple of seconds and then go right
                back to the login dialog with the error message:
                mknod: Permission denied
                This is because of your /tmp directory permissions; they should look
                like this:
                drwxrwxrwx

                Other than these problems, my install went smoothly. Thanks to all who
                helped me.

                Aditya
                Back to top



                --- In redhat@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@d...> wrote:
                > On Thu, Feb 05, 2004 at 06:18:18PM +0000, deech_99 wrote:
                > > K> The heck with 'em, just use apt-get.
                > > Apt-get does work and when I run aptitude, I am able to select all my
                > > available packages.
                > >
                > > However, I am not all that familiar with package names and things like
                > > that. So I am struggling a bit to figure out what packages I really
                > > need and what I don't.
                >
                > Ok, you can do apt-cache search <package name>
                >
                > You can also do apt-get -s install <package name> to see what will be
                > installed and see what is recommended. (The s is for simulate)
                >
                > >
                > > MY other problem is that apparently I chose the wrong video card
                > > driver during the initial part of my install so I cannot get x windows
                > > to start. I have an ATI MOBILITY? RADEON? 9000 4X AGP 3D Graphics
                > > Accelerator with 64MB EMBEDDED DDR Memory. I chose the 'ati' driver,
                > > which seems to give me errors when I try gdm. Does anyone know what
                > > the right driver for this is?
                >
                > Hrrm, I have a Rage128 which worked with ATI.
                >
                > You could try running xf86config which will give you a wider choice of
                > dirvers (I think.)
                >
                > Just note that it looks for, assuming you did x-window-system
                > XF86Config-4 and xf86config writes to XF86Config
                >
                >
                > --
                >
                > Scott
                >
                > GPG KeyID EB3467D6
                > ( 1B848 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6)
                > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
                >
                > Ford: I wanna be like you...A vampire.
                > Spike: I've known you for two minutes and I can't stand you. I
                > don't really feature you living forever. Can I eat him now love?
              • Scott
                ... Wimp. Upgrade to Sid. :) Seriously, Sarge always strikes me as the worst of both worlds, not considered stable, but also using older packages. I ve
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 7, 2004
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                  On Sun, Feb 08, 2004 at 01:31:22AM +0000, deech_99 wrote:
                  > Sarge has been successfully installed onto my laptop and so far its
                  > running like a champ. The key to installing Sarge sucessfully for me (
                  > a Debian newbie) was to install Mandrake (which automatically detects
                  > my network cards ) on another partition and use that to remotely
                  > install Sarge.

                  Wimp. Upgrade to Sid. :)

                  Seriously, Sarge always strikes me as the worst of both worlds, not
                  considered stable, but also using older packages. I've found the best
                  way (for me) is to use Woody, then immediately upgrade to Sid.



                  > DSelect is Debian's package management tool and meant for experts
                  > only. By experts, I mean people who already know the names of the
                  > packages they need.


                  >
                  >
                  > Using Aptitude you can do both, select categories and individual packages.

                  I keep meaning to play with Aptitude, but so far, haven't really needed
                  it---my needs are fairly basic, and I check what I need with apt-cache
                  search.

                  >

                  > Apt is a really nice tool that downloads and installs packages onto
                  > your system. The best part is that, unlike rpm, it figures out the
                  > dependancies and installs them. Apt uses a file called sources.list in
                  > /etc/apt that holds the links to the packages for you distribution.
                  > Unfortunately, the remote install which is supposed to set up that
                  > file for you screws it up and sticks in 'debootstrap.invalid' as your
                  > link.
                  > You must now go and hand-edit this file. Here is what mine looks like:
                  >
                  > deb http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing main contrib non-free
                  > deb-src http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing main contrib
                  > deb http://security.debian.org/ testing/updates main contrib
                  >
                  > X Server Has Problems Starting
                  > ---------------------------------------------
                  > I had lot of problems getting Xserver to start. I could start the
                  > graphical login screen but whenever I tried to login as a non-root
                  > user, the screen would blank for a couple of seconds and then go right
                  > back to the login dialog with the error message:
                  > mknod: Permission denied
                  > This is because of your /tmp directory permissions; they should look
                  > like this:
                  > drwxrwxrwx
                  >
                  > Other than these problems, my install went smoothly. Thanks to all who
                  > helped me.


                  Good luck with it. Deb is considered rock solid stable. My Deb page
                  has a link to a fairly helpful page (two actually) from distrowatch that
                  I think you might find helpful (My page is more for the experienced user
                  who is trying deb--my page is at
                  http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/debian.html and the link I
                  refer to is the distrowatch articles, parts 1 and 2)


                  --

                  Scott Robbins

                  PGP keyID EB3467D6
                  ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
                  gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

                  Spike: Nasty sort of fellow. Lucky for you blighters I was
                  here, eh?
                  Giles: Yes. Thank you. Although your heroism is slightly muted by the
                  fact that you were helping Adam to start a war that would kill us
                  all.
                  Xander: You probably just saved us so we wouldn't stake you right
                  here.
                  Spike: Well, yeah. Did it work?
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