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Re: I found them!!!! Now what do I do with them?

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  • Debra Thompson
    Hi Donna Anne - I can answer both questions:) First - the Durian. Do NOT open it - set it on your counter and allow it to open itself. It will have a
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 2, 2006
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      Hi Donna Anne -

      I can answer both questions:) First - the Durian. Do NOT open it -
      set it on your counter and allow it to open itself. It will have a
      sulphuric odor about it when it opens. The flesh is in pods
      underneath that brash exterior. It will look somewhat like custard
      when you cut into the pods. I've only ever bought one, and my
      husband has begged me to not ever do it again because of the odor.
      One suggestion I've heard about using the durian is to blend it with
      orange juice to make a smoothie. People either love them or hate
      them. Some make an effort to acquire a taste for them.

      Now to the good stuff:) The young thai coconuts! The easiest thing
      to do is simple make a coconut smoothie - carefully open the young
      coconut and pour the milk into your blender. Scrape the flesh out of
      the shell with a spoon and blend well - add ice and blend again.
      It's a wonderful, light, creamy treat!

      It is also used in herb salad. I got this recipe from Storm &
      Jinjee's Natural Paradigms channel in an episode of Raw Vegan
      Kitchen. I've modified it for my household because I don't do garlic
      or onions, and my husband is scared to death of habanero peppers...I
      do keep the peppers and oil on the side for my personal use;) You can
      change it up however you feel, whenever you feel like a change of
      pace. My mother-in-law recently came for a visit and I made it for
      her - but had to put the tomatoes on the side in addition to no
      onions or peppers - she has some major digestive issues due to auto-
      immune troubles. She LOVED the herb salad I'd made for her and took
      the recipe home with her:)

      Herb Salad:

      * one bunch cilantro
      * one bunch parsley
      * fresh basil
      * fresh tarragon
      * fresh oregano
      * one red onion
      * two tomatoes
      * one avocado
      * two young coconuts
      * 4 habaƱero peppers
      * half a cup of raw almonds
      * cold-pressed olive oil
      * unrefined sea salt
      * raw honey
      * half a lemon

      Chop up cilantro, parsley, herbs, 1/2 the onion, avocados and
      tomatoes in a bowl. Add the meat of a young coconut, chopped up.
      Blend almonds to a fine flour in a dry blender. Put in food processor
      with the meat of the other young coconut and the other 1/2 of the
      onion. Blend and add to the bowl of herb salad. Add the juice of half
      a lemon, a tablespoon of olive oil, a tablespoon of honey, and a
      teaspoon of salt. Chop up habaƱeros and soak in olive oil for a few
      minutes. Add 1/4 teaspoon to the bowl of herb salad. Mix well and
      serve.

      It comes out sort of like tabouli, but BETTER! I have found that it
      will keep over night, but a third day is pushing it, so if you're
      doing this alone, you might want to modify the quantities used. In
      the show, Storm makes a dressing of olive oil, raw apple cider
      vinegar, and raw honey to pour lightly on the salad - it's great!

      Use the leftover coconut milk to make a nice drink to accompany your
      salad. I'm addicted to this salad, and have never liked parsley! I
      use the curly leaf version - I tried the flat leaf and it just wasn't
      as good!

      If you're interested in more recipes by them, go to www.the
      gardendiet.com - The young coconuts are also used in their raw vegan
      tacos recipe:) I got both of these from their Raw Vegan Kitchen
      shows! There is also a link there for their Natural Paradigms
      channel. It's only $10 per month and they're adding one new show per
      week. Their lineup is diverse - July was their launch.

      Hope this helps!!

      Deb







      In rawfood@yahoogroups.com, "Donna Masi" <TribalFantasyDesigns@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hello Everyone!
      >
      > Going on what you guys say about checking out the Asian food
      markets I did so today and was SUPER psyched to find my very first
      Thai Coconuts and Durian! ( frozen ).
      > So what do I do with either of these now that I found them? The
      durian is frozen- do I defrost a piece and east it cold or room
      temp? The coconuts I will look up a tutorial online about opening-
      but any special ideas about what to do once I open it?? I also found
      canned fried crickets. but I passed on those. Feeling REALLY happy to
      be vegan at that point.....LOL!!!!!
      >
      > Donna anne
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Audrey Walker
      Hi Donna, Try this delicious smoothie/milk shake made with your young coconut. Blend up the milk and the flesh of the coconut with 3 or four frozen bananas and
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 3, 2006
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        Hi Donna,

        Try this delicious smoothie/milk shake made with your young coconut. Blend
        up the milk and the flesh of the coconut with 3 or four frozen bananas and a
        handful of raw almonds (or a couple of tablespoons of almond butter). It is
        so delicious!!!

        All the best,

        Audrey
        www.rawhealling.com


        >From: Alex Malinsky <alexmalinsky@...>
        >Reply-To: rawfood@yahoogroups.com
        >To: rawfood@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [Raw Food] I found them!!!! Now what do I do with them?
        >Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 21:21:52 -0700 (PDT)
        >
        >Hey Donna,
        >
        >Check out the easy way to open a young coconut.
        >http://www.rawguru.com/openyoungcoconut.html
        >
        >Best,
        >Alex
        >www.rawguru.com
        >www.rawfoodchat.com
        >
        >Donna Masi <TribalFantasyDesigns@...> wrote:
        > Hello Everyone!
        >
        > Going on what you guys say about checking out the Asian food markets I
        >did so today and was SUPER psyched to find my very first Thai Coconuts and
        >Durian! ( frozen ).
        > So what do I do with either of these now that I found them? The durian is
        >frozen- do I defrost a piece and east it cold or room temp? The coconuts I
        >will look up a tutorial online about opening- but any special ideas about
        >what to do once I open it?? I also found canned fried crickets. but I
        >passed on those. Feeling REALLY happy to be vegan at that
        >point.....LOL!!!!!
        >
        > Donna anne
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >---------------------------------
        >Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small
        >Business.
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Donna Masi
        Thanks everyone who responded about my Thai coconut and Durian questions. I tried both today for the first time. The coconut was easy to open- spilled quite a
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 3, 2006
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          Thanks everyone who responded about my Thai coconut and Durian questions. I tried both today for the first time.
          The coconut was easy to open- spilled quite a bit of liquid though. Used it in my usual smoothie and was not impressed.
          Will not buy them again. I found the "meat" to be kind of slimy and weird.

          The durian? Whole other story. As soon as I cut open the frozen package to remove one "pod" I smelled it. WOW. If it smelled
          that much frozen what would it smell like defrosted? The smell intensified as it defrosted. I told my husband it smelled like a cross
          between a field of rotting onions and cat pee. When I finally tasted it I was unsure what parts were the edible part but knew it was supposed to be custard like.
          So, I tentatively tried a small bit and was surprised that it tasted better than it smelled. I tasted a custard like substance that was vanillay with an aftertaste
          of caramel. But lord, that smell put me off so much I put the rest of the piece in a plastic bag and tossed it outside. My husband, who has no sense of smell said he could smell it and to please turn on a fan....LOL!!!!

          I don't think I will be eating the rest of the package!

          Donna anne

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • las_lala
          As far as the coconuts, I don t like them plain, either. I think they do add something to my dessert-type shakes, but I might try them without and see the
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 3, 2006
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            As far as the coconuts, I don't like them plain, either. I think
            they do add something to my dessert-type shakes, but I might try
            them without and see the difference.

            I had the same experience with frozen durian. I couldn't even bring
            myself to try it. People say the fresh is much different and
            better. But very hard to find in the U.S.

            Laurie

            --- In rawfood@yahoogroups.com, "Donna Masi"
            <TribalFantasyDesigns@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks everyone who responded about my Thai coconut and Durian
            questions. I tried both today for the first time.
            > The coconut was easy to open- spilled quite a bit of liquid
            though. Used it in my usual smoothie and was not impressed.
            > Will not buy them again. I found the "meat" to be kind of slimy
            and weird.
            >
            > The durian? Whole other story. As soon as I cut open the frozen
            package to remove one "pod" I smelled it. WOW. If it smelled
            > that much frozen what would it smell like defrosted? The smell
            intensified as it defrosted. I told my husband it smelled like a
            cross
            > between a field of rotting onions and cat pee. When I finally
            tasted it I was unsure what parts were the edible part but knew it
            was supposed to be custard like.
            > So, I tentatively tried a small bit and was surprised that it
            tasted better than it smelled. I tasted a custard like substance
            that was vanillay with an aftertaste
            > of caramel. But lord, that smell put me off so much I put the rest
            of the piece in a plastic bag and tossed it outside. My husband,
            who has no sense of smell said he could smell it and to please turn
            on a fan....LOL!!!!
            >
            > I don't think I will be eating the rest of the package!
            >
            > Donna anne
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • melanieburtis
            ... There are a couple of interesting recipes for the young coconut meat in Raw Food Real World. They recommend cutting up the meat and using it like noodles
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 4, 2006
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              --- In rawfood@yahoogroups.com, "las_lala" <laurie@...> wrote:
              >
              > As far as the coconuts, I don't like them plain, either. I think
              > they do add something to my dessert-type shakes, but I might try
              > them without and see the difference.
              >
              > Laurie
              >
              There are a couple of interesting recipes for the young coconut meat in Raw Food Real World.
              They recommend cutting up the meat and using it like "noodles" for a mock-Pad Thai (which
              is EXCELLENT, even with regular fresh coconut meat), or cutting the meat into squares and
              using those like ravioli and putting a filling in between, or grinding the meat up and
              dehydrating it to make wraps (like eggroll wraps) and stuffing the wraps with a curried
              coconut mix.

              Melanie
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