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Re: long vowels in Q words (was: Re: The present-tense stem)

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  • Ales Bican
    I wrote that a long vowel in the final syllable was permitted in a Quenya word only if the syllable was also the first syllable of the word, i.e. the word was
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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      I wrote that a long vowel in the final syllable was
      permitted in a Quenya word only if the syllable was
      also the first syllable of the word, i.e. the word
      was monosyllabic.

      C Masuoka responded:

      > I have only (in my limited experience with the language)
      > seen one example of a Quenya word with more than one syllable
      > hat ended in a long vowel. This may not count (since _avá_
      > is also spelled _áva_), but:
      >
      > áva, avá (the latter stressed on the final syllable) "Don't!";
      > ávan "I won't" (also ván, ványë); áva carë! ("k") "don't do
      > it!" (WJ:371)

      **You are right. _avá_ is an exception. However, the reason
      why we see the long _á_ in dissyllabic _avá_ (and the accent
      on it) is, I think, because it "shows combination with
      the imperative particle *_â_" (WJ:371), i.e. _vá_ in _avá_
      retained its length and accent when _â_ was prefixed
      (which was accordingly shorthened and de-accented to
      _a-_ [*]). In _áva_, however, _vá_ was shortened and
      de-accented instead.

      [*] Why we do not see *_unótime_ then is hard to tell.
      Perhaps _ú-_ did not have an unaccented variant *_u-_
      as e.g. _á_ or _ó-_ (see WJ:367) did and it was not
      morphologically possible to have *_unótime_ and
      morphological needs overrode phonotactical rules.

      * * *

      I also wrote that the first two syllables in _únótime_
      were accented.

      Nathan Foreman asked:

      > When you say that both syllables are accented,
      > do you mean that both syllables are written with
      > an accent when written in Roman letters? Surely
      > you don't mean that stress falls upon both of
      > these syllables when spoken? The O gets the stress,
      > does it not?

      **By 'accented' I really mean stressed. Yes, both
      syllables _ú_ and _nó_ in _únótime_ are stressed.
      The syllable _nó_ receives the main, high-toned,
      stress, the syllable _ú_ bears the secondary stress
      that was lower in tone and also weaker in force
      in this position.

      In _The Road Goes Ever On_ Tolkien gave an account
      on secondary stresses in Quenya. The initial syllable
      usually retained some degree of stress. This
      secondary stress was lower in tone than the main
      stress but often equal in force to the main stress
      (as in e.g. _oromardi_). The secondary stress was
      somewhat weaker if it fell on a long syllable
      immediately preceding a main-stressed syllable (as
      in case of _únótime_). A long syllable is such a
      syllable that contains a long vowel or a diphthong
      or a short vowel followed by two consonants. Short
      syllables in such a position were unstressed (hence
      e.g. the first syllable of _avánier_ was unstressed).
      If a word with three and more syllables ended in
      two short syllables, the final syllable received a
      light stress (as in e.g. _tellumar_ as well as in
      _únótime_). (Taken from RGEO, pp. 60-1.)


      Ales Bican

      --
      What's in a name? That which we call a rose
      by any other name would smell as sweet. (Juliet, _Romeo and Juliet_)
    • Carl F. Hostetter
      I just want to say that I agree with most of what Ales has said, and thank him for correcting my too-broad statement. I suspect that verbal inflection and
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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        I just want to say that I agree with most of what Ales has said, and
        thank him for correcting my too-broad statement.

        I suspect that verbal inflection and emphasis played a significant role
        in the Quenya system of stress/accentuation, particularly where
        prefixed particles, such as the imperative, negative, and negative
        imperative, are concerned.

        Carl
      • Atwe
        ... There is _ufárea_ in FC, if that counts. ===== Thomas Ferencz Manuel!!! Que? I m so sorry, he s from Barcelona. __________________________________ Do
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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          --- Ales Bican <ales.bican@...> wrote:



          > [*] Why we do not see *_un�time_ then is hard to
          > tell.
          > Perhaps _�-_ did not have an unaccented variant
          > *_u-_
          > as e.g. _�_ or _�-_ (see WJ:367) did and it was not
          > morphologically possible to have *_un�time_ and
          > morphological needs overrode phonotactical rules.

          There is _uf�rea_ in FC, if that counts.

          =====
          Thomas Ferencz

          "Manuel!!!
          Que?
          I'm so sorry, he's from Barcelona."

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