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Re: [qiresearch] Digest Number 570. Pushing someone by actually touching

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  • martyeisen@aol.com
    Qi is not involved, but simple Physics. Consider standing naturally with your feet shouder width apart and parallel. Your base of support is a rectangle with
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2010
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      Qi is not involved, but simple Physics.

      Consider standing naturally with your feet shouder width apart and
      parallel. Your base of support is a rectangle with length about
      shoulder width and widthn the length of your foot. if you push a person
      in this stance from the front or back, little force is required to
      unbalance him, since this will occur as soon as his center of gravity
      is ouside his base, which is only a little greater than half the length
      of his foot. However, if you push straight from either side greater
      force is required and it is not as easy, since his center of gravity
      must be moved more than half a shoulder width.

      If you are standing on one foot you are extremely unstable in any
      direction, since your base of support is just the area of your foot.
      You would be on one foot when you are climbing up stairs. I have seen
      people stumble when their name is called, since they tense up and their
      center of gravity moves out of the small support base. Having someone
      suddenly mimic a push without touching could also easily cause you to
      fall and it is not because of a Qi force.

      Some people claim that they cannot be pushed bbecause their Qi is too
      strong. Humnans have only two legs and so every stance is weak in some
      direction, as described above. As soon as the center of gravity gets
      out of the support base the person will lose his balance and move. If
      your teacher can also fly this will not happen.

      There are several reasons some people are hard to push. Tthe person
      being pushed is so massive that the pusher is not strong enough to push
      him. The pusher does not know the correct direction to push or how to
      apply force efficiently.
      The persom being pushed is very skillful, having practiced Tai Chi for
      some time. The pusher tries to push at right angle to the opponent's
      body. However, the pushee can turn and relax so that the force is
      tangential to his body. No matter how hard you push, the person feels
      sippery or as if nothing is there. Another technique is to relaxx and
      turn so that the resultant force pushes the pushee into the ground.
      This feels like you are trying to push a huge mountain. This is just
      plain Physics and has little to do with Qi, but is the result of years
      of practice.
    • Lama Tantrapa
      ... Thank you, Marty, for your detailed analysis. The last option defines the difference between my Natural Stance vs. Wuji Stance in Taiji. In order to make
      Message 2 of 2 , May 6, 2010
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        > Another technique is to relax and
        > turn so that the resultant force pushes the pushee into the ground.
        > This feels like you are trying to push a huge mountain. This is just
        > plain Physics and has little to do with Qi, but is the result of years
        > of practice.

        Thank you, Marty, for your detailed analysis. The last option defines the difference between my Natural Stance vs. Wuji Stance in Taiji. In order to make the feet turn directly forward, most people have to contract the groin muscle called Pectineus, which adversely effects how relaxed they are and their flow of Qi, if you will. Additionally, many Taiji teachers tend to instruct their students to "tuck the tailbone" by tilting the pelvis backward to some degree by tensing up the Hamstrings and Abs. This eliminates the natural lumbar curve of the spine thus reducing the adaptability of the posture, plus the habitual tensing of the Hamstrings and Abs often leads to limited flexibility, range of motion and difficulty with abdominal breathing.

        As if this is not enough to make it really hard to stand, some zealots also insist that the knee joints must be directly above the feet, which requires tensing up the Gluteus (muscles of the buttocks) and promoted distributing the weight more on the outer edges of the feet. Anyone interested in testing the stability of this stance is welcome to compare such a stance with the Natural Stance that can be taken by simply jumping and landing softly on the entire surface of the soles of the feet. Of course, there are many minor adjustments I can add to this, but this would have to be another post. For your reference, feel free to read my book online at http://books.google.com/books?id=n5uwVkQqJOoC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_v2_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.

        Namaste,

        Lama Tantrapa
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