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Canada's National Commission on Mental Health

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  • Pay_the_Piper
    Yesterday Prime Minister Harper announced the $55 m. National Commission on Mental Health based in Calgary. Its purpose in years to come will be to reduce the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
      Yesterday Prime Minister Harper announced the $55 m. National Commission on
      Mental Health based in Calgary. Its purpose in years to come will be to
      reduce the "stigma" of mental illness as he worded it.

      What methods could the science of medical psychology use to de-stigmatize
      mental illness?

      Was that a factor in the case of Mother Teresa as recently discussed on the
      P-R list? Were diagnosis and treatment denied her over so many decades of
      suffering because they would have stigmatized her and ruined her career?

      PtP
    • Pay_the_Piper
      Mother Teresa worked with the street people of India. Are they called the pariah class in that country? Here they are called homeless people. Q 1) Is there
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 2007
        Mother Teresa worked with the "street people" of India. Are they called the pariah class in that country? Here they are called homeless people.
         
        Q 1)  Is there stigmatization to being labelled a "pariah" in India or "homeless" in Canada?
         
        Q 2) Should stigmatization be part of the (scientific) diagnosis when people go for medical psychology treatment?
         
        PtP
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2007 10:04 AM
        Subject: [psychiatry-research] Canada's National Commission on Mental Health

        Yesterday Prime Minister Harper announced the $55 m. National Commission on
        Mental Health based in Calgary. Its purpose in years to come will be to
        reduce the "stigma" of mental illness as he worded it.

        What methods could the science of medical psychology use to de-stigmatize
        mental illness?

        Was that a factor in the case of Mother Teresa as recently discussed on the
        P-R list? Were diagnosis and treatment denied her over so many decades of
        suffering because they would have stigmatized her and ruined her career?

        PtP


        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.1/982 - Release Date: 8/31/2007 5:21 PM
      • Pay_the_Piper
        For a decade I worked on the deinstitutionalization of people with mental disabilities, many of whom were stigmatized by physical handicaps as well. The teams
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 2007
          For a decade I worked on the deinstitutionalization of people with mental disabilities, many of whom were stigmatized by physical handicaps as well. The teams doing this work were multi-disciplinary and the assessment did include description of these stigmatizations from the perspective of the different disciplines. When any circumstance draws adverse attention from society at large, that circumstance may be a stigmatization and injurious to mental health. It doesn't have to be found on a page of DSM to be a factor in mental illness.
           
          When Senator Campbell, also a public health doctor was mayor of Vancouver he commented that most of the thousands of homeless in the Vancouver region are mentally ill and that is almost certainly correct. Does it stigmatize a person to be homeless?
          Yes. It is a major stigmatization. And there are many other adversities for the homeless which also induce and sustain mental illness.
           
          Vancouver's first problem has to do with getting homelessness-related symptoms on the charts of general practitioners.
           
          PtP
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, September 03, 2007 10:31 AM
          Subject: Re: [psychiatry-research] Canada's National Commission on Mental Health

          Mother Teresa worked with the "street people" of India. Are they called the pariah class in that country? Here they are called homeless people.
           
          Q 1)  Is there stigmatization to being labelled a "pariah" in India or "homeless" in Canada?
           
          Q 2) Should stigmatization be part of the (scientific) diagnosis when people go for medical psychology treatment?
           
          PtP
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2007 10:04 AM
          Subject: [psychiatry- research] Canada's National Commission on Mental Health

          Yesterday Prime Minister Harper announced the $55 m. National Commission on
          Mental Health based in Calgary. Its purpose in years to come will be to
          reduce the "stigma" of mental illness as he worded it.

          What methods could the science of medical psychology use to de-stigmatize
          mental illness?

          Was that a factor in the case of Mother Teresa as recently discussed on the
          P-R list? Were diagnosis and treatment denied her over so many decades of
          suffering because they would have stigmatized her and ruined her career?

          PtP


          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.484 / Virus Database: 269.13.1/982 - Release Date: 8/31/2007 5:21 PM


          No virus found in this incoming message.
          Checked by AVG Free Edition.
          Version: 7.5.485 / Virus Database: 269.13.3/986 - Release Date: 9/3/2007 9:31 AM
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