Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Paper: Psychosocial stress predicts future symptom severities in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder

Expand Messages
  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry Volume 48 Issue 2 Page 157 - February 2007 To cite this article: Haiqun Lin, Liliya Katsovich, Musie Ghebremichael,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 31, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Cover of Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

      Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

      Volume 48 Issue 2 Page 157 - February 2007

      To cite this article: Haiqun Lin, Liliya Katsovich, Musie Ghebremichael, Diane B. Findley, Heidi Grantz, Paul J. Lombroso, Robert A. King, Heping Zhang, James F. Leckman (2007)
      Psychosocial stress predicts future symptom severities in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder
      Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 48 (2), 157–166.
      doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2006.01687.x

      Psychosocial stress predicts future symptom severities in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder

      Haiqun Lin, Liliya Katsovich, Musie Ghebremichael, Diane B. Findley, Heidi Grantz, Paul J. Lombroso, Robert A. King, Heping Zhang and James F. Leckman
       
      Abstract

      Background: The goals of this prospective longitudinal study were to monitor levels of psychosocial stress in children and adolescents with Tourette syndrome (TS) and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to healthy control subjects and to examine the relationship between measures of psychosocial stress and fluctuations in tic, obsessive-compulsive (OC), and depressive symptom severity.

      Methods: Consecutive ratings of tic, OC and depressive symptom severity were obtained for 45 cases and 41 matched healthy control subjects over a two-year period. Measures of psychosocial stress included youth self-report, parental report, and clinician ratings of long-term contextual threat. Structural equation modeling for unbalanced repeated measures was used to assess the temporal sequence of psychosocial stress with the severity of tic, OC and depressive symptoms.

      Results: Subjects with TS and OCD experienced significantly more psychosocial stress than did the controls. Estimates of psychosocial stress were predictive of future depressive symptoms. Current levels of psychosocial stress were also a significant predictor of future OC symptom severity, but not vice versa. Current OC symptom severity was a predictor of future depressive symptom severity, but not vice versa. Current levels of psychosocial stress and depression were independent predictors of future tic severity, even after controlling for the effect of advancing chronological age.

      Conclusions: The impact of antecedent psychosocial adversity is greater on future depressive symptoms than for tic and/or OC symptoms. Worsening OC symptoms are also a predictor of future depressive symptoms. Advancing chronological age is robustly associated with reductions in tic severity.

      Source: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2006.01687.x

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.