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Article: Trends in Thoughts of Suicide in the US

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    PUBLIC HEALTH: TRENDS IN THOUGHTS OF SUICIDE IN THE US The following points are made by R.C. Kessler et al (J. Am. Med. Assoc. 2005 293:2487): 1) Suicide is
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 30, 2005
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      PUBLIC HEALTH: TRENDS IN THOUGHTS OF SUICIDE IN THE US

      The following points are made by R.C. Kessler et al (J. Am. Med. Assoc. 2005 293:2487):

      1) Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. As a result, the World Health Organization[1] and the US surgeon general[2] have highlighted the need for more comprehensive data on the occurrence of suicidal thoughts and attempts, according to the assumption that such data would be useful for planning national health care policy, as well as for evaluating efforts to reduce suicide and suicide-related behaviors. The latter are among the official national health objectives in the United States.[3] The assumption that information on suicide-related behaviors, including thoughts, plans, gestures, and nonfatal attempts, is important for understanding completed suicides can be called into question because only a small fraction of suicide attempters eventually complete suicide.[4] However, suicide attempts are significant predictors of subsequent completed suicide, as well as important in their own right as indicators of extreme psychological distress.

      2) Little is known about trends in suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, or attempts or about their treatment. Such data are needed to guide and evaluate policies to reduce suicide-related behaviors. The objective of this study was to analyze nationally representative trend data on suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, attempts, and their treatment. Data came from the 1990-1992 National Comorbidity Survey and the 2001-2003 National Comorbidity Survey Replication. These surveys asked identical questions to 9708 people aged 18 to 54 years about the past year's occurrence of suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, attempts, and treatment. Trends were evaluated by using pooled logistic regression analysis. Face-to-face interviews were administered in the homes of respondents, who were nationally representative samples of US English-speaking residents.
       
       
      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek
    • Jim Goodwin
      With such communications as the below, I often wonder is it me or the authors of the below who might have to change their figure ground orientation to notice
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 4, 2005
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        With such communications as the below, I often wonder is it me or the authors of the below who might have to change their figure ground orientation to notice the forest from the tree we find so intriguing?
         
        Is not suicide the terminal physical symptom of a depressive disorder; whether the depression is recognized or as too often not?
         
        Is such discussion of the mechanics of this depressive symptom as below, very much like the discussion of  weeping skin pustules and incessant itching without even a mere mention (nowhere in the link below is the word depression mentioned-not once) of the poison ivy which caused such symptoms in the first place?  And without a thorough and concise understanding  on how to identify and avoid poison ivy, will not such pustules and incessant itching continue unabated regardless of our very rich interest in just how the skin weeps and itches so incessantly?
         
        Jim Goodwin, Psy.D. aka "The Pied Piper of Depression"
        Clinical Psychologist
        Wenatchee, Washington USA
           

        Robert Karl Stonjek <stonjek@...> wrote:
        PUBLIC HEALTH: TRENDS IN THOUGHTS OF SUICIDE IN THE US

        The following points are made by R.C. Kessler et al (J. Am. Med. Assoc. 2005 293:2487):

        1) Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. As a result, the World Health Organization[1] and the US surgeon general[2] have highlighted the need for more comprehensive data on the occurrence of suicidal thoughts and attempts, according to the assumption that such data would be useful for planning national health care policy, as well as for evaluating efforts to reduce suicide and suicide-related behaviors. The latter are among the official national health objectives in the United States.[3] The assumption that information on suicide-related behaviors, including thoughts, plans, gestures, and nonfatal attempts, is important for understanding completed suicides can be called into question because only a small fraction of suicide attempters eventually complete suicide.[4] However, suicide attempts are significant predictors of subsequent completed suicide, as well as important in their own right as indicators of extreme psychological distress.

        2) Little is known about trends in suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, or attempts or about their treatment. Such data are needed to guide and evaluate policies to reduce suicide-related behaviors. The objective of this study was to analyze nationally representative trend data on suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, attempts, and their treatment. Data came from the 1990-1992 National Comorbidity Survey and the 2001-2003 National Comorbidity Survey Replication. These surveys asked identical questions to 9708 people aged 18 to 54 years about the past year's occurrence of suicidal ideation, plans, gestures, attempts, and treatment. Trends were evaluated by using pooled logistic regression analysis. Face-to-face interviews were administered in the homes of respondents, who were nationally representative samples of US English-speaking residents.
         
         
        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek

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