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re: Ray Buckey's Press Corps and the Tunnels of McMartin - part one

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  • smartnews@aol.com
    This may be heavy for survivors of abuse. From: Psychic Dictatorship in the USA, Alex Constantine (Feral House, 1995). Ray Buckey s Press Corps and the Tunnels
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 24, 2000
      This may be heavy for survivors of abuse.

      From: Psychic Dictatorship in the USA, Alex Constantine (Feral House, 1995).

      Ray Buckey's Press Corps
      and the Tunnels of McMartin

      part one

      "In preparation for the trial, 389 toddlers were interviewed ­ nearly all of
      them described abuse at the preschool, and do to this day. Some 80 percent
      had physical symptoms, including blunt force trauma of sexual areas,
      scarring, rectal bleeding and sexual diseases."

      A fusillade of press reports, OpEd Columns
      and television documentaries have dismissed
      the McMartin case as a "witch hunt" born of
      mass hysteria, coercive therapy, false memories
      and greed. Yet all seven jurors attending a
      press conference after the second trial raised
      heir hands when asked who among them
      believed children had been abused at the preschool.
      So why the call to public denial from the press?

      ‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹

      After the initial flurry of press coverage of the McMartin Preschool
      molestation case, a number of sympathetic reporters and psychiatrists
      publicly exonerated Ray Buckey and his co-defendants. This observer's
      gallery of "skeptics" also deny that ritual abuse is a social problem.
      The argument consistently leads to the lament that the McMartin
      allegations were incited by mass hysteria, an ambitious district attorney
      and an incompetent child therapist. The hysteria thesis, promoted by a small
      group of pedophile defense psychologists, mostly, has appeared in
      publications of stature including the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco
      Chronicle, Wall Street Journal, Village Voice, Harper's, New Yorker,
      Newsweek,. The McMartin case was the subject of an Oliver Stone cable
      feature.
      Media boosters of the defense neglect to acknowledge the most damning
      evidence in the McMartin case. Instead, they explain away superficial,
      carefully-sifted pieces of the case. In preparation for the trial, 389
      toddlers were interviewed ­ nearly all of them described abuse at the
      preschool, and do to this day. Some 80 percent had physical symptoms,
      including blunt force trauma of sexual areas, scarring, rectal bleeding and
      sexual diseases.
      Interestingly enough, skeptics of ritual abuse in the public print often
      have dubious bona fides themselves. Some even participate secretly in the
      pedophile and occult undergrounds, most notably a couple of Los Angeles
      writers who have written the only two book available on McMartin, taking
      mental health professionals, police, the press and prosecutors to task for
      pursuing false allegations of abuse.
      The Politics of Child Abuse, by Paul and Shirley Eberle, purports to be
      something of a definitive investigation. A blurb for the book exults: "This
      has got to be one of the most devastating political detective stories of all
      time. The authors smashed open the child abuse witch-hunt so everyone can
      see it for what it is ­ the way it really happened, and why. Here is the
      amazing story, starting with the first spectacular accusations, the marathon
      pre-trial hearing, the endless series of false accusations."
      Since the Eberles' first McMartin book appeared in 19896, the Eberles
      have achieved national status as child abuse experts. In courts of law their
      work is frequently cited, and they lecture widely to receptive audiences.
      The Eberles once appeared as featured speakers at a conference held by
      Victims of Child Abuse Laws (VOCAL), an organization that feted The politics
      of child Abuse as positively revelatory.
      But Paul and shirley Eberle can hardly be considered credible reporters.
      Blurbs in their own pornographic tabloid, L.A. Star, failed to mention that
      in the 1970s the authors once ran an underground tabloid for pedophiles in
      Los Angeles, Finger, which delved heavily into sadomasochistic sex, sex with
      children and sex acts involving human excrement. Finger contained sexual
      drawings by children and pedophile erotica, including "My First Rape," "She
      was Only Thirteen," "Sexpot at Five," and "What Happens when Niggers Adopt
      White Children." One issue featured a cover photo of two naked adults
      reclining amid a pile of inflated dolls. A letter to Finger declaimed: "I'm
      a pedophile and I think it's great a man is having sex with his daughter....
      Would like to see pics of nude girls making it with their daddy, but realize
      its too risky to print."
      The book's publisher, Carole Stuart of Lyle Stuart & Co., told Ms.
      magazine that the Eberles have been "friends of the family for years."
      In The Politics of Child Abuse, the Eberles claimed that since the
      McMartin arrests, "we have been barraged with hundreds of sexual abuse
      cases, in which many people have been sent to prison for staggeringly long
      terms on little or no evidence." That the Eberles themselves remain at large
      would seem to contradict the notion that child abuse laws are stringently
      over-enforced.
      The Eberles attempt to portray every abuser as a victim of the justice
      system:

      We believe that every molestation case in which there has
      been a conviction should be reopened and reviewed. There is
      convincing evidence that innocent people have been imprisoned,
      that naive juries and judges were unable to believe the defendants
      would be brought to trial if no crime had occurred, and defense
      attorneys have not been allowed to bring all the pertinent
      facts before the public.

      Los Angeles attorney Sally Dichter, in a book review, argued that the
      Eberles have "nothing to offer to any discipline." The book she lamented,
      "is an attempt to vindicate every individual who has been convicted of child
      abuse." Considering their credentials as child pornographers, of course the
      Eberles, as Dichter discovered, believe "every molestation case in which
      there has been a conviction should be reopened and reviewed." Dichter found
      this point of view unbelievable: "The Eberles seem intent on convincing the
      reader that child abuse never occurs."
      The authors "skepticism" of ritual child abuse is shared by Gerald
      Larue, professor emeritus of Biblical history and archeology at the
      University of Southern California. Larue is one of the principals behind the
      Noah's Ark hoax, which culminated in February 1993 with a two-hour CBS
      prime-time special, "The Incredible Discovery of Noah's Ark, billed by CBS
      as a documentary. Scholars immediately denounced it. The network refused to
      retract.
      Satanism in America, a book that Larue co-wrote, attributed the McMartin
      case to a "satanic panic" incited by wild-eyed "religious fanatics,
      opportunists and emotionally unstable survivors whose stories simply are not
      to be believed" ---­ an agonizing irony given Larue's instigation of the
      Noah's Ark hoax. He argues that the "child abuse hysteria sweeping the
      country us being fueled by people for whom facts have no meaning. They
      invent 'facts.'"
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