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RE: Rules for Media release

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  • Vaib Gangan
    Hi, My two pennies worth contribution about media releases. Thought I’ll highlight a few points from an article I am about to publish in a PR journal.
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 1, 2006
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      Hi,

      My two pennies worth contribution about media releases.

      Thought I’ll highlight a few points from an article I am about to publish in a PR journal.

      (Please take it with a pinch of salt, as my comments from my experience in the western world):

      Dos and Don’ts of a media release:


      1. Put the release in the message body. BECAUSE: We either don’t have
      time to open attachments; or are worried about the “I love you” virus.

      2. The '"subject" line should identify the email as media release. We
      receive hundreds of emails every week, and its important that your release is not trashed as junk mail.

      3. When mass-mailing, use email software to address each email directly to the journalist/newspaper, so that spam filters don't block your release.

      4. Come to the point in first paragraph. Journalists normally decide
      within first three sentences or first five seconds, whichever is earlier.

      5. Cut the jargon. Journalists normally suffer from "information overload syndrome". If we have to cut through a jungle of superlatives, and self-praise phrases, we are too happy to use the "delete" button.

      6. Remember, your release is competing for attention with a hundred
      others. The key word is "relevance". Don't send a local news item to a
      national daily, for example.

      7. Please don't fax your releases. Because: 1. My copy editors can't copy it. 2. Save trees, use less paper. 3. Emails reach the editors faster than fax; your release might just make the deadline, or make their day

      8. I loathe large attachments. I don't care about logos as long as I get valid contact details in the release. If you want to send large images (over 100KB), use your website or its FTP server, if you have one. If not, use www.yousendit.com

      9. Most importantly, your release should be "ready to serve". Write it
      like you are writing a newspaper story - ready to print. Don't write an academic paper, or promotional flyer. Editor or journalists should be able to use it without much further "cooking time". Also, I am more likely to use a release that contains quotes than one without.

      10. Final tip: The contact person in the release should be well-prepared to go on air or on record with half hour's notice, if at all. It's important the he has his three key messages written on a single piece of paper, ready to fire away. Stick to those messages. Don’t say “anything” which is not on this piece of paper. We journalists love those ‘off-the-cuff’ remarks.

      © Vaibhav Gangan, Managing Editor, The Global Indian magazine, Auckland.

      (reproduction outside this Yahoo Group prohibited without author’s
      permission)
    • Narendran A
      Dear All I wish to add my view about the press releases thats been sent out today. 1. Most of the releases are advatorial than a press release 2. Even if we
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 1, 2006
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        Dear All

        I wish to add my view about the press releases thats
        been sent out today.

        1. Most of the releases are advatorial than a press release

        2. Even if we (PR) write a normal press release,clients make it an advertorial. I have experience of taking scoldings from client for writng a proper press release.

        3. Some Corporates think that they are issuing a release and over do with information and finally a good news goes in to basket.

        Looking for response.

        Best regards
        Narren


        --- Vaib Gangan <vgangan@...> wrote:

        > Hi,
        >
        > My two pennies worth contribution about media
        > releases.
        >
        > Thought I’ll highlight a few points from an article
        > I am about to publish in a PR journal.
        >
        > (Please take it with a pinch of salt, as my comments
        > from my experience in the western world):
        >
        > Dos and Don’ts of a media release:
        >
        >
        > 1. Put the release in the message body. BECAUSE: We
        > either don’t have
        > time to open attachments; or are worried about the
        > “I love you” virus.
        >
        > 2. The '"subject" line should identify the email as
        > media release. We
        > receive hundreds of emails every week, and its
        > important that your release is not trashed as junk
        > mail.
        >
        > 3. When mass-mailing, use email software to address
        > each email directly to the journalist/newspaper, so
        > that spam filters don't block your release.
        >
        > 4. Come to the point in first paragraph. Journalists
        > normally decide
        > within first three sentences or first five seconds,
        > whichever is earlier.
        >
        > 5. Cut the jargon. Journalists normally suffer from
        > "information overload syndrome". If we have to cut
        > through a jungle of superlatives, and self-praise
        > phrases, we are too happy to use the "delete"
        > button.
        >
        > 6. Remember, your release is competing for attention
        > with a hundred
        > others. The key word is "relevance". Don't send a
        > local news item to a
        > national daily, for example.
        >
        > 7. Please don't fax your releases. Because: 1. My
        > copy editors can't copy it. 2. Save trees, use less
        > paper. 3. Emails reach the editors faster than fax;
        > your release might just make the deadline, or make
        > their day
        >
        > 8. I loathe large attachments. I don't care about
        > logos as long as I get valid contact details in the
        > release. If you want to send large images (over
        > 100KB), use your website or its FTP server, if you
        > have one. If not, use www.yousendit.com
        >
        > 9. Most importantly, your release should be "ready
        > to serve". Write it
        > like you are writing a newspaper story - ready to
        > print. Don't write an academic paper, or promotional
        > flyer. Editor or journalists should be able to use
        > it without much further "cooking time". Also, I am
        > more likely to use a release that contains quotes
        > than one without.
        >
        > 10. Final tip: The contact person in the release
        > should be well-prepared to go on air or on record
        > with half hour's notice, if at all. It's important
        > the he has his three key messages written on a
        > single piece of paper, ready to fire away. Stick to
        > those messages. Don’t say “anything” which is not on
        > this piece of paper. We journalists love those
        > ‘off-the-cuff’ remarks.
        >
        > © Vaibhav Gangan, Managing Editor, The Global Indian
        > magazine, Auckland.
        >
        > (reproduction outside this Yahoo Group prohibited
        > without author’s
        > permission)
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Kiran Nagpal
        I strongly agree with Narren. There are some clients who want to eulogize about themselves in every release they send and lose out on the essence of the
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 3, 2006
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          I strongly agree with Narren. There are some clients who want to
          eulogize about themselves in every release they send and lose out on
          the essence of the particular news. Encompassing such a load takes 3-4
          pages with which the client is happy and not the media people. And PR
          person get sandwiched between the media and the client. Though we know
          the rules of writing a press release but it becomes difficult to
          implement them. But what is the solution? I think that this is the
          time when PR person should put his foot down and tell the client to
          let the expert decide on the content for the release.

          Kiran Joshi
          98155-42519
        • uma g
          Yes, I completely agree with Mr Naren and Mr Kiran on the PR role in the press release decision. Uma Gopalakrishnan Kiran Nagpal
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 3, 2006
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            Yes, I completely agree with Mr Naren and Mr Kiran on the PR role in the press release decision.

            Uma Gopalakrishnan


            Kiran Nagpal <kirannagpal1@...> wrote:
            I strongly agree with Narren. There are some clients who want to
            eulogize about themselves in every release they send and lose out on
            the essence of the particular news. Encompassing such a load takes 3-4
            pages with which the client is happy and not the media people. And PR
            person get sandwiched between the media and the client. Though we know
            the rules of writing a press release but it becomes difficult to
            implement them. But what is the solution? I think that this is the
            time when PR person should put his foot down and tell the client to
            let the expert decide on the content for the release.

            Kiran Joshi
            98155-42519
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