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3 Nissan

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  • Ora K
    In the merit of this learning may Zehava bat Yehudis and Yael bat Yehudis each be blessed with complete health, happiness, clarity, success, and only revealed
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 13, 2013
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      In the merit of this learning may Zehava bat Yehudis and Yael bat Yehudis each be blessed with complete health, happiness, clarity, success, and only revealed good. 

      I
      At times you might find yourself in the midst of a moral dilemma. You are called upon to comment on a purchase, the choice of a marriage partner, or anything similar. The person who is asking you for your opinion has already made their final decision and nothing beneficial will be gained by making a negative statement. The person would prefer that you would say something positive about their choice, but you feel negative about it. Should you voice your negative feelings or should you distort the truth by saying something positive? The Talmud (Ktubot 17a) states that in these type of situations our obligation not to say anything that will hurt a person's feelings is greater than our obligation to keep a distance from falsehood. ****** This does not apply if you need to say something for a constructive purpose.

      II 
      Some people rationalize insulting remarks by saying, "I'm just telling the honest truth." Even if what you say is true, it is still causing pain with words for no reason. Such negative statements have no benefit (unless they are said constructively for a constructive purpose) and in fact can cause long term pain - they will always be present and can tarnish the feelings, approach, and or relationship with the person or object they asked you about. Just because something is true does not mean that it is permissible or appropriate to say it. 

      (The Power of Words by Rabbi Zelig Pliskin)

      Create a meaningful day!
      - Ora

    • Ora K
      In the merit of this learning may Malka Baila bat Shoshana Chava be blessed with an immediate refuah shleima bitoch she ar cholei yisrael.  I At times you
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 2 9:10 PM
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        In the merit of this learning may Malka Baila bat Shoshana Chava be blessed with an immediate refuah shleima bitoch she'ar cholei yisrael. 

        I
        At times you might find yourself in the midst of a moral dilemma. You are called upon to comment on a purchase, the choice of a marriage partner, or anything similar. The person who is asking you for your opinion has already made their final decision and nothing beneficial will be gained by making a negative statement. The person would prefer that you would say something positive about their choice, but you feel negative about it. Should you voice your negative feelings or should you distort the truth by saying something positive? The Talmud (Ktubot 17a) states that in these type of situations our obligation not to say anything that will hurt a person's feelings is greater than our obligation to keep a distance from falsehood. ****** This does not apply if you need to say something for a constructive purpose.

        II 
        Some people rationalize insulting remarks by saying, "I'm just telling the honest truth." Even if what you say is true, it is still causing pain with words for no reason. Such negative statements have no benefit (unless they are said constructively for a constructive purpose) and in fact can cause long term pain - they will always be present and can tarnish the feelings, approach, and or relationship with the person or object they asked you about. Just because something is true does not mean that it is permissible or appropriate to say it. 

        (The Power of Words by Rabbi Zelig Pliskin)

        Create a meaningful day!
        - Ora


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