Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [prominence] Snowshoes - advice please

Expand Messages
  • Rob Woodall
    Thanks everyone - your experience is really appreciated. Adam - a kind offer. I emailed one company last night (mpgear - that would be mountainplus?) about
    Message 1 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
      Thanks everyone - your experience is really appreciated.

      Adam - a kind offer. I emailed one company last night (mpgear - that would
      be mountainplus?) about shipping costs and times - they have yet to come
      back to me.

      Norway - I think they use skis and crampons - have discussed these matters
      with Petter Bjorstad (it's his weekend) - unsure if he has a view on
      showshoe recommendations ....

      Rob

      On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 6:39 AM, Adam Helman <helman@...> wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      > >Atlas goes with the tubular frame. While they do have less gripping power
      > than MSR Evo or Lightning models that rely on overkill >grip, it does give
      > an advantage when threading over hardened crust that covers soft snow
      > underneath. The MSR Lightning will cut >through almost all the time where
      > the MSR Evos will tend to break through far less. The Atlas on the other
      > hand are almost immune >to this. The dominant factor in breaking through
      > crust will be the user's weight.
      >
      > The "breaking through" noted here has never been an issue with me using MSR
      > Lightning Ascent model.
      > However I bet that it's a major issue for heavier individuals - tipping the
      > balance in favor of Atlas for this particular consideration.
      > My previous snowshoes were indeed the tubular, Atlas variety .... and since
      > I consider there to be "no contest",
      > favoring my current pair, I must conclude that one's weight is a seriously
      > important variable when deciding what model to purchase.
      >
      > I don't use my snowshoes enough ... but I **have** encountered all manner
      > of snow consistency in combination
      > with side-gradient - enough so that I can indeed provide a valid opinion.
      >
      > Plus, the retractable heer bar noted by Eric Noel and then Matt Payne is a
      > major help when going uphill
      > on all but the most gentle of slopes. Don't get a snowshoe lacking this
      > device!!!
      >
      > ************************************************
      >
      > Rob: I've examined non-USA websites in the Southern Hemisphere (Argentina,
      > Chile, etc...) hoping to locate
      > for you a cheaper MSR on-sale because for THEM the winter season just
      > ended. Unfortunately I found no discounts -
      > only considerable price markups (such as $410 !) ... and likely due to some
      > tariff imposed on imported goods.
      >
      > I got my MSR Lightning Ascent for just $144 two years ago : on-sale at REI
      > because it was the last year's model.
      > It's too bad that you need the snowshoes so shortly in late January; else
      > you'd have the luxury of waiting until
      > some company hosts a similarly enticing sale of older goods.
      >
      > Maybe you can borrow somebody's Atlas, and also somebody's MSR ("Denali" or
      > "Lightning") and evaluate them
      > over a weekend before making a purchase so see what works best for YOU.
      >
      > Adam H.
      >
      >
      > I would ask for advice from folks in Norway if that is where you are
      > going, I have a suspicion that many ascents there are done on skis but
      > unlike snowshoes you can't just go out and use them.
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Matt Payne
      Hehe I wonder what it would cost to ship to you from here. My friend picked up a pair for like $120 last year, and I think MSR is getting rid of their old
      Message 2 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
        Hehe I wonder what it would cost to ship to you from here. My friend picked
        up a pair for like $120 last year, and I think MSR is getting rid of their
        old model (which is still excellent).

        On Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 11:39 PM, Adam Helman <helman@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > >Atlas goes with the tubular frame. While they do have less gripping power
        > than MSR Evo or Lightning models that rely on overkill >grip, it does give
        > an advantage when threading over hardened crust that covers soft snow
        > underneath. The MSR Lightning will cut >through almost all the time where
        > the MSR Evos will tend to break through far less. The Atlas on the other
        > hand are almost immune >to this. The dominant factor in breaking through
        > crust will be the user's weight.
        >
        > The "breaking through" noted here has never been an issue with me using MSR
        > Lightning Ascent model.
        > However I bet that it's a major issue for heavier individuals - tipping the
        > balance in favor of Atlas for this particular consideration.
        > My previous snowshoes were indeed the tubular, Atlas variety .... and since
        > I consider there to be "no contest",
        > favoring my current pair, I must conclude that one's weight is a seriously
        > important variable when deciding what model to purchase.
        >
        > I don't use my snowshoes enough ... but I **have** encountered all manner
        > of snow consistency in combination
        > with side-gradient - enough so that I can indeed provide a valid opinion.
        >
        > Plus, the retractable heer bar noted by Eric Noel and then Matt Payne is a
        > major help when going uphill
        > on all but the most gentle of slopes. Don't get a snowshoe lacking this
        > device!!!
        >
        > ************************************************
        >
        > Rob: I've examined non-USA websites in the Southern Hemisphere (Argentina,
        > Chile, etc...) hoping to locate
        > for you a cheaper MSR on-sale because for THEM the winter season just
        > ended. Unfortunately I found no discounts -
        > only considerable price markups (such as $410 !) ... and likely due to some
        > tariff imposed on imported goods.
        >
        > I got my MSR Lightning Ascent for just $144 two years ago : on-sale at REI
        > because it was the last year's model.
        > It's too bad that you need the snowshoes so shortly in late January; else
        > you'd have the luxury of waiting until
        > some company hosts a similarly enticing sale of older goods.
        >
        > Maybe you can borrow somebody's Atlas, and also somebody's MSR ("Denali" or
        > "Lightning") and evaluate them
        > over a weekend before making a purchase so see what works best for YOU.
        >
        > Adam H.
        >
        > I would ask for advice from folks in Norway if that is where you are
        > going, I have a suspicion that many ascents there are done on skis but
        > unlike snowshoes you can't just go out and use them.
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Kind Regards,
        Matt Payne
        http://www.100summits.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Roy Schweiker
        ... It used to be that standard uphill technique was to kick in the snowshoe flat like you would do with a bare boot, hence the bar would hinder this. A bar
        Message 3 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
          > Plus, the retractable heer bar noted by Eric Noel and then Matt
          >Payne is a major help when going uphill
          >on all but the most gentle of slopes. Don't get a snowshoe lacking
          >this device!!!

          It used to be that standard uphill technique was to kick in the snowshoe
          flat like you would do with a bare boot, hence the bar would hinder this.
          A bar would seem to be useful chiefly on packed trails where you can't
          kick in.

          I would say that plastic snowshoes are more susceptible to catastropic
          failure, having had them break in half on a trip once and crack on other
          occasions is plenty. With a pulled rivet or so you just keep walking and
          fix it at home. Of course the most repairable in the field are the wood
          frames with cord webbing but who uses those any more?

          The guy who was #2 to climb the NE 111 in winter used to have detachable
          crampons on his snowshoes which he would wear uphill for traction but
          take off downhill for better glide and less icing.


          ____________________________________________________________
          Obama Urges Homeowners to Refinance
          If you owe under $729k you probably qualify for Obama's Refi Program
          http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4cf684032235ead899m01vuc
        • Rob Woodall
          ... Wow! Is this something you could possibly look into, Matt? Rob [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
            On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 1:29 PM, Matt Payne <mattpayne11@...> wrote:

            > Hehe I wonder what it would cost to ship to you from here. My friend picked
            > up a pair for like $120 last year, and I think MSR is getting rid of their
            > old model (which is still excellent).


            Wow! Is this something you could possibly look into, Matt?
            Rob


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Petter Bjorstad
            Rob, For use in Norway in January, there will be loose snow and likely no tracks. You will sink in, also with skis. The hope is that you do not sink too deep.
            Message 5 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
              Rob,

              For use in Norway in January, there will be loose snow and likely
              no tracks. You will sink in, also with skis. The hope is that you
              do not sink too deep. 6 feet long sounds excessive (as long as skis!),
              rather use some that are a bit wider..

              Skis are the long term solution, but snowshoes might be better in the
              short term since they require LESS "new skills" (only therefore)..

              If the snow is wind packed / hard (on upper slopes), then switch to
              just boots and carry crampons.. (in case (unlikely in January) that you
              run into hard, steepish slopes..

              This is local advise with the caveat that I NEVER use snowshoes, ONLY skis..

              Best Regards Petter
            • Adam Helman
              I bet that Petter and others of his homeland would frown upon the concept of using snowshoes rather than skis, and as Roy S. noted. Still, Rob, NOTE that no
              Message 6 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
                I bet that Petter and others of his homeland would frown upon the
                concept of using snowshoes rather than skis, and as Roy S. noted.

                Still, Rob, NOTE that no guided Denali expedition assumes you are a skier -
                they all travel by snowshoe. Likeliest, this is to gather the largest
                possible
                client base for their profit margin. So snowshoes have a definite place....

                Snowshoeing is pure FUN given the right snow, packweight and weather
                conditions.
                Consider the "winter"-size (extra broad) baskets for the base of your
                trekking poles.

                Adam H.

                >
                > Norway - I think they use skis and crampons - have discussed these matters
                > with Petter Bjorstad (it's his weekend) - unsure if he has a view on
                > showshoe recommendations ....
                >
                > Rob
                >
              • Matt Payne
                Yeah if you want to look into shipping costs I can look for local vendors that sell it on the cheap. I m actually going to one tonight. Matt ... -- Kind
                Message 7 of 19 , Dec 1, 2010
                  Yeah if you want to look into shipping costs I can look for local vendors
                  that sell it on the cheap. I'm actually going to one tonight.

                  Matt

                  On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 6:31 AM, Rob Woodall <rhwxyz@...> wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  > On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 1:29 PM, Matt Payne <mattpayne11@...<mattpayne11%40gmail.com>>
                  > wrote:
                  >
                  > > Hehe I wonder what it would cost to ship to you from here. My friend
                  > picked
                  > > up a pair for like $120 last year, and I think MSR is getting rid of
                  > their
                  > > old model (which is still excellent).
                  >
                  > Wow! Is this something you could possibly look into, Matt?
                  > Rob
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Kind Regards,
                  Matt Payne
                  http://www.100summits.com


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.