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below ice saddles

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  • Andy Martin
    (Mark Nichols) With all this talk about Antarctica a couple questions occurred to me. #1. I am told much of the Antarctica is covered by 2 miles of ice. How
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 5, 2001
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      (Mark Nichols)
      With all this talk about Antarctica a couple questions occurred to me.

      #1. I am told much of the Antarctica is covered by 2 miles of ice.
      How does one go about mapping a continent covered with 10,000'
      of ice? Ice penetrating radar?

      (Andy)
      Not sure if "below ice" maps are available, or how to make them.
      Imagine seismic surveys with explosives could pick up the
      ice/rock boundary.


      #2. If an Antarctica 50 or 100 Finest where to be made, no doubt some
      of the candidates would be completely covered (something was said
      about a volcano in this regard?). Does anybody know of any high
      prominence summits that peak out a couple hundred feet below (or
      above) the surface? Perhaps an expedition could be lead to "dig" to
      the summit. (This would be somewhat analogous to climbing the
      "Big Island" from sea level instead of the ocean floor 15,000' below
      the surface).

      PS. I just thought of this. Are there any Sea Mounts just below the waves?

      Steve Fry did some work with ocean bottom charts to compute
      ocean floor prominence. There are many sea mounts that top out
      within a few hundred feet of the ocean surface. Some will have
      good "ocean bottom" prominence, would guess over 5,000' in some
      cases.

      Another difficult question for our panel of experts - which
      underwater peak has greatest "ocean bottom" prominence ?


      My personal preference is to ignore below ice or below
      natural water saddles, I want high prominence peaks to be
      visually exciting.
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