Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

studio backlots

Expand Messages
  • gf willmetts
    Hello Don Were the sets created at the time each studio was opened?? All right, I guess some were but this particular one wouldn’t have been made in 1905.
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 21, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Don



      Were the
      sets created at the time each studio was opened?? All right, I guess some were
      but this particular one wouldn�t have been made in 1905.



      The Warner�s
      water tower became something of an icon in its own way, didn�t it?? I presume
      it was a functional device than a prop, before and after moving. Keeping it but
      changing its position proved that. Didn�t it appear in some of their cartoons
      as well?? It certainly comes up in reference to the studio.



      I doubt if
      that backlot would have been created any of the TV series, so it would probably
      have been for films. Considering how little architecture changed in that
      period, it could well have been used in the 1940s.



      The reason I
      pointed out the UNCLE backlot is if we�re going to understand a bit about these
      sets and how to recognise them, then we need to see if we can recognise the
      sets easily and choosing ones that have a significant look might also train the
      eye to spot them. From reading the UNCLE reference book and certainly from what
      David McCallum said in the DVD boxset, a lot of the MGM sets he recognised from
      the gangster movies, which places them from the 1930s. For any US studio, the
      number of films they put out, it made sense to have some pretty solid sets made
      for continual re-use than reinvent each time.



      Geoff





      *************** Geoff Willmetts editor, SFCrowsnest.org.uk and other suffixes ****************

      Please note NEW email address while OLD one is being sorted out.

      Biggest SF website in Europe and second biggest, and that's only because the first is a commerical site, in the world
      and they look to what we do!

      *************************************************************************************



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John
      The very simple answer is that they evolved as the need arose and the projects had the budget to build the facade. Then later projects would come along and
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 21, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        The very simple answer is that they evolved as the need arose and the
        projects had the budget to build the facade. Then later projects would
        come along and make use of them. TV shows would build if something special
        was needed, and then with each new season they might add to it with fresh
        budget money. Can't remember if I learned about it here, but another great
        site is http://www.retroweb.com/40acres.html . One of the location sites
        there was Stalag 13 from Hogan's Heroes. There is a first season picture
        and you can see that the back and sides of Klink's office are undeveloped.
        But a second season picture shows that they added the entrance to Klink's
        quarters to the side of that building facade. In 1975, some movie used the
        prison camp set for some movie.

        The facade for 1313 Mockingbird Lane was later used as an ordinary house in
        other productions, including the home in the sitcom Shirley. What I don't
        know is if the "house" was there before The Munsters.



        On Thu, Mar 21, 2013 at 6:46 AM, gf willmetts
        <gfwillmetts-2@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hello Don
        >
        >
        >
        > Were the
        > sets created at the time each studio was opened?? All right, I guess some
        > were
        > but this particular one wouldn�t have been made in 1905.
        >
        >
        >
        > The Warner�s
        > water tower became something of an icon in its own way, didn�t it?? I
        > presume
        > it was a functional device than a prop, before and after moving. Keeping
        > it but
        > changing its position proved that. Didn�t it appear in some of their
        > cartoons
        > as well?? It certainly comes up in reference to the studio.
        >
        >
        >
        > I doubt if
        > that backlot would have been created any of the TV series, so it would
        > probably
        > have been for films. Considering how little architecture changed in that
        > period, it could well have been used in the 1940s.
        >
        >
        >
        > The reason I
        > pointed out the UNCLE backlot is if we�re going to understand a bit about
        > these
        > sets and how to recognise them, then we need to see if we can recognise the
        > sets easily and choosing ones that have a significant look might also
        > train the
        > eye to spot them. From reading the UNCLE reference book and certainly from
        > what
        > David McCallum said in the DVD boxset, a lot of the MGM sets he recognised
        > from
        > the gangster movies, which places them from the 1930s. For any US studio,
        > the
        > number of films they put out, it made sense to have some pretty solid sets
        > made
        > for continual re-use than reinvent each time.
        >
        >
        >
        > Geoff


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dghprobe3
        John: Thanks for the link regarding the 40 Acres backlot. That was where The Andy Griffith Show filmed the exteriors for Mayberry, the Courthouse (Sheriff
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 21, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          John: Thanks for the link regarding the 40 Acres backlot. That was where The Andy Griffith Show filmed the exteriors for Mayberry, the Courthouse (Sheriff Taylor's office), Floyd's Barber Shop, etc.

          (Again, we should be clear that these backlot buildings are just facades for the most part. The interior scenes, again, for the most part, were filmed on soundstages elsewhere. In some rare cases there were exterior facades which may have had a certain amount of interior detail, but again, that was the exception.)

          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres_desilu_years.html

          40 Acres was used in the Star Trek episodes "Miri" (they beam down not far from the front of Sheriff Taylor's office), "Return of the Archons," and "City on the Edge of Forever" (Kirk and Edith walk in front of Floyd's Barber Shop in one scene). "Errand of Mercy" and "The Cage" also made used of 40 Acres (the Arab Village portion).

          Landing party in "Miri":
          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres/40acres_star_trek_cast.jpg

          Mayberry exteriors, the "Miri" beamdown was in front of the building facade marked "Hotel":
          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres/40acres_Mayberry_detail.jpg

          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres_tour.html
          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres_tour_pt2.html

          Kirk & Edith walk past Floyd's Barber Shop:
          http://www.retroweb.com/40acres/floyds_barber_shop_trek.jpg

          In episodes of The Green Hornet, you can see the Black Beauty pass in front of Sheriff Taylor's office, the building with the columns out front. The first season of Mission Impossible also made use of Mayberry exteriors in "A Spool There Was," for example. I Spy reportedly filmed their episode, "Cops and Robbers," at 40 Acres.

          Regarding Munster Mansion, wiki reports that the house was originally built for the 1946 movie "So Goes My Love." More at this link:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munster_Mansion

          ================================

          --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, John wrote:
          >
          > The very simple answer is that they evolved as the need arose and the
          > projects had the budget to build the facade. Then later projects would
          > come along and make use of them. TV shows would build if something special
          > was needed, and then with each new season they might add to it with fresh
          > budget money. Can't remember if I learned about it here, but another great
          > site is http://www.retroweb.com/40acres.html . One of the location sites
          > there was Stalag 13 from Hogan's Heroes. There is a first season picture
          > and you can see that the back and sides of Klink's office are undeveloped.
          > But a second season picture shows that they added the entrance to Klink's
          > quarters to the side of that building facade. In 1975, some movie used the
          > prison camp set for some movie.
          >
          > The facade for 1313 Mockingbird Lane was later used as an ordinary house in
          > other productions, including the home in the sitcom Shirley. What I don't
          > know is if the "house" was there before The Munsters.
          >
          >
          >
          > On Thu, Mar 21, 2013 at 6:46 AM, gf willmetts
          > <gfwillmetts-2@...>wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hello Don
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Were the
          > > sets created at the time each studio was opened?? All right, I guess some
          > > were
          > > but this particular one wouldn't have been made in 1905.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > The Warner's
          > > water tower became something of an icon in its own way, didn't it?? I
          > > presume
          > > it was a functional device than a prop, before and after moving. Keeping
          > > it but
          > > changing its position proved that. Didn't it appear in some of their
          > > cartoons
          > > as well?? It certainly comes up in reference to the studio.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I doubt if
          > > that backlot would have been created any of the TV series, so it would
          > > probably
          > > have been for films. Considering how little architecture changed in that
          > > period, it could well have been used in the 1940s.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > The reason I
          > > pointed out the UNCLE backlot is if we're going to understand a bit about
          > > these
          > > sets and how to recognise them, then we need to see if we can recognise the
          > > sets easily and choosing ones that have a significant look might also
          > > train the
          > > eye to spot them. From reading the UNCLE reference book and certainly from
          > > what
          > > David McCallum said in the DVD boxset, a lot of the MGM sets he recognised
          > > from
          > > the gangster movies, which places them from the 1930s. For any US studio,
          > > the
          > > number of films they put out, it made sense to have some pretty solid sets
          > > made
          > > for continual re-use than reinvent each time.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Geoff
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.