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Re: [probe_control] Re: Comets, Eggs, and Vincent (Oh my!)

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  • LambuLambu@aol.com
    Geoff, I understand what you said before about catching a ride on a comet, and the aspect of never returning home because it would basically take several
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 7, 2010
      Geoff,

      I understand what you said before about catching a ride on a comet,
      and the aspect of never returning home because it would basically take
      several lifetimes. I was just using the comet-hopping in relation to the
      underground as a metaphor, but after your response I believe I should have used an
      airport instead. Like you say, comets are not that close together (as
      trains would be). Hopping comets to get to places and back home again is more
      akin to landing at Gate 2 of a huge airport and trying to make your
      connecting flight which leaves from Gate 23, which at some airports I've been is a
      brisk 10-minute walk, even walking along the moving walkways (which gives the
      effect of running). Unless your timing is perfect you'll miss that
      connecting comet, and that's if you even have a way of getting to it.


      American omelettes? I'm not sure which box you've seen, but the omelettes
      my wife makes are the traditional sort. She fills the pan with lightly
      scrambled eggs, waits for them to firm up, then adds the fillings, and when she
      feels the time is right folds it in half to finish cooking. She may flip
      it once if needed. What you described sounds more like scrambled eggs with
      stuff thrown in. I've seen that on all of the ships I've been stationed on.
      People who are usually in a hurry and can't be bothered to wait for the
      omelette will usually ask for - and I've heard the order to the cook - "A ham,
      sausage, and cheese omelette, but scramble it up so it cooks faster." (My
      thoughts: why not just order "Scrambled eggs with ham, sausage, and
      cheese"? If you're in that much if a hurry it would certainly be faster to say.)
      Personally, I prefer the traditional omelette.

      Vincent Price also lent his voice to "The 13 Ghosts of Scooby Doo"
      back in the mid 1980s. (I'd forgotten about that one.) And now Cartoon
      Network's new series "Scooby Doo! Mystery Incorporated" is tipping the hat by
      having Shaggy and Scooby watching "Vincent Van Ghoul Movies". Vincent Van Ghoul
      was a main character in "13 Ghosts" who was voiced by Price and even
      looked like him. The actor voicing Van Ghoul in "Mystery Incorporated" does a
      decent job of capturing Price's unique vocal qualities, and the character's
      appearance is that of the Van Ghoul character of "13 Ghosts".


      When it comes to my grammar checker, I basically ignore it where the
      dialogue is concerned. I take second looks at sentences where the checker
      highlights something, and decide whether or not it really needs altering. If
      I can't decide which way sounds (reads) better, I have a sort of failsafe
      which I use... ("Honey? Would you read these two sentences and tell me which
      one sounds better?") My wife is a great help there. She's read thousands
      of books (literally) in her lifetime and continues reading almost
      constantly. She sadly grew up with a father who believed television was an instrument
      of the devil and refused to have one (he was more than a little
      unbalanced) so she took to books and stayed with them even after moving away from
      home to live with her older sister. She's read just about every genre you
      could imagine, including documentaries and travel guides.

      I agree with you on the comma before 'but' issue. Sometimes a sentence
      just doesn't read right with that comma in there. (The same goes for a
      comma before 'which', which is also one of those "American" grammar
      differences. Sometimes putting that comma in just doesn't help with the flow of the
      intended thought.)

      I'm also working on a different story, a historical fiction about a
      woman lighthouse keeper and her betrothed who is the first mate on a clipper
      ship. This one is in a more serious tone than the SF story and is set in
      1880. I go back and forth between the two which gives me a fresh perspective
      on each as I re-read them. I do find that allows me to go back to one
      without having to step back for several months; I can go back after just a few
      weeks and see something that I missed the last time or doesn't make sense
      now. Flip-flopping like that also helps keep my thought processes active, and
      with the medication I've to take for my chronic injury is a good thing.

      Dino.


      In a message dated 10/7/2010 6:14:28 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      gfwillmetts@... writes:

      Hello Dino

      Where I live is on the edge of a deep valley so a lot of the bad weather
      will go over head and hit the other end of town although if we get it, the
      rest is in as much trouble.
      Unless your Net connection uses electricity lines, it’s always likely to
      be affected by climate change.

      Re: 2061. It’s not one of Clarke’s greatest books. I think he made a
      mistake of keeping bringing back characters from the first book and upgrading
      the technology far too quickly. Thinking about it, Clarke wasn’t the first
      to suggest comet riding. Some chap called Jules Verne chose a similar route.
      Unfortunately, there are no railways in space. Very few comets are close
      to each other in space and most go outside of the solar system. If you
      planned a round trip you’d never survive. Halley’s Comet takes over 80 years so
      you could barely rock around the clock. :-)

      I’m still puzzled by the American omelette not being a complete piece.
      What I’ve seen on the box we would call scrambled eggs.

      ‘Theatre Of Blood’ was about four years prior to Phibes. Vincent Price, as
      you say, was really talented with an unmistakable voice.

      Re: grammar checkers. There are option controls to allow colloquial speech
      or you would be doomed writing dialogue. They should only be used as a
      guide not run your word processor. If they were bright, then they’d do their
      own writing.

      Re: telepathy. This is the point I was making about recognising body
      language of the people you know about you. A lot of it is unconscious signs. I
      mean, you would know if someone was getting angry and not just by them
      raising their voices.
      As a clinical empath, I can link into anyone near me. Some have higher
      empath reactive response than others and just think they know me which is
      always weird for strangers. I can raise you on the phone link, I can think of
      someone I haven’t seen for a while and within two weeks see them in town.

      Re: writing. The best technique for doing a self-edit is once you’ve
      finished a draft, to go away from it for a week or so and come back with fresh
      eyes. A lot of the mistakes stick out like sore thumbs. I can do that over a
      shorter interval if I’m writing more than one piece at the same time.
      Modifying from a UK perspective to a US one if I’m submitting abroad isn’
      t that difficult. A lot of UK publishers are owned by US publishers these
      days. I doubt if an American publisher would insist on a comma before a ‘but’
      unless it needed it. The trick is to listen to the sentence. If the tone
      changes, like here for instance, then you know where to put the commas in.

      By the by, I used that example of the scuba gear in my editorial this
      month. Let’s hope not too many people try it for real although head dipping for
      crabs is fun.

      Always remember the human body is the worse case of parallel evolution.

      Geoff


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Geoff Willmetts
      Hello Dino Space travel doesn’t match up to any metaphor. I suspect when long distance space travel is worked out it won’t be anything like SF depicts it
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 7, 2010
        Hello Dino

        Space travel doesn�t match up to any metaphor. I suspect when long distance space travel is worked out it won�t be anything like SF depicts it neither. Not even sure airports would match come to that. You�d have to go to gate 300 more like.

        Re: American omelettes. Wouldn�t make much difference to me. Eggs give me headaches. We can�t get over some of the names you chaps call your food. I mean, eggs over easy is just lightly cooked eggs.

        Re: grammar. It helps if reading is in your blood. �So many books, only one life-time� is my mantra. It helps to have good diction and listening to how things sound.
        Probably the biggest problem I see amateurs and pros make is confusing �either� and �neither�.

        I presume you�ve got at least a skeleton plot laid down before writing?? Doesn�t mean you can�t deviate but then you�ll know that it affects as well.
        Something that happens with a lot of amateur writers is they run out of steam half-way through. If they can�t keep their interest in the story then how can a reader?? When I do my stories, I like to surprise the audience so it keeps me on my toes.

        Geoff


        ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
        Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
        THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
        Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!

        WE DON�T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-

        AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/

        ***************************************************






        To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com
        From: LambuLambu@...
        Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2010 12:46:32 -0400
        Subject: Re: [probe_control] Re: Comets, Eggs, and Vincent (Oh my!)






        Geoff,

        I understand what you said before about catching a ride on a comet,
        and the aspect of never returning home because it would basically take
        several lifetimes. I was just using the comet-hopping in relation to the
        underground as a metaphor, but after your response I believe I should have used an
        airport instead. Like you say, comets are not that close together (as
        trains would be). Hopping comets to get to places and back home again is more
        akin to landing at Gate 2 of a huge airport and trying to make your
        connecting flight which leaves from Gate 23, which at some airports I've been is a
        brisk 10-minute walk, even walking along the moving walkways (which gives the
        effect of running). Unless your timing is perfect you'll miss that
        connecting comet, and that's if you even have a way of getting to it.


        American omelettes? I'm not sure which box you've seen, but the omelettes
        my wife makes are the traditional sort. She fills the pan with lightly
        scrambled eggs, waits for them to firm up, then adds the fillings, and when she
        feels the time is right folds it in half to finish cooking. She may flip
        it once if needed. What you described sounds more like scrambled eggs with
        stuff thrown in. I've seen that on all of the ships I've been stationed on.
        People who are usually in a hurry and can't be bothered to wait for the
        omelette will usually ask for - and I've heard the order to the cook - "A ham,
        sausage, and cheese omelette, but scramble it up so it cooks faster." (My
        thoughts: why not just order "Scrambled eggs with ham, sausage, and
        cheese"? If you're in that much if a hurry it would certainly be faster to say.)
        Personally, I prefer the traditional omelette.

        Vincent Price also lent his voice to "The 13 Ghosts of Scooby Doo"
        back in the mid 1980s. (I'd forgotten about that one.) And now Cartoon
        Network's new series "Scooby Doo! Mystery Incorporated" is tipping the hat by
        having Shaggy and Scooby watching "Vincent Van Ghoul Movies". Vincent Van Ghoul
        was a main character in "13 Ghosts" who was voiced by Price and even
        looked like him. The actor voicing Van Ghoul in "Mystery Incorporated" does a
        decent job of capturing Price's unique vocal qualities, and the character's
        appearance is that of the Van Ghoul character of "13 Ghosts".


        When it comes to my grammar checker, I basically ignore it where the
        dialogue is concerned. I take second looks at sentences where the checker
        highlights something, and decide whether or not it really needs altering. If
        I can't decide which way sounds (reads) better, I have a sort of failsafe
        which I use... ("Honey? Would you read these two sentences and tell me which
        one sounds better?") My wife is a great help there. She's read thousands
        of books (literally) in her lifetime and continues reading almost
        constantly. She sadly grew up with a father who believed television was an instrument
        of the devil and refused to have one (he was more than a little
        unbalanced) so she took to books and stayed with them even after moving away from
        home to live with her older sister. She's read just about every genre you
        could imagine, including documentaries and travel guides.

        I agree with you on the comma before 'but' issue. Sometimes a sentence
        just doesn't read right with that comma in there. (The same goes for a
        comma before 'which', which is also one of those "American" grammar
        differences. Sometimes putting that comma in just doesn't help with the flow of the
        intended thought.)

        I'm also working on a different story, a historical fiction about a
        woman lighthouse keeper and her betrothed who is the first mate on a clipper
        ship. This one is in a more serious tone than the SF story and is set in
        1880. I go back and forth between the two which gives me a fresh perspective
        on each as I re-read them. I do find that allows me to go back to one
        without having to step back for several months; I can go back after just a few
        weeks and see something that I missed the last time or doesn't make sense
        now. Flip-flopping like that also helps keep my thought processes active, and
        with the medication I've to take for my chronic injury is a good thing.

        Dino.


        In a message dated 10/7/2010 6:14:28 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        gfwillmetts@... writes:

        Hello Dino

        Where I live is on the edge of a deep valley so a lot of the bad weather
        will go over head and hit the other end of town although if we get it, the
        rest is in as much trouble.
        Unless your Net connection uses electricity lines, it�s always likely to
        be affected by climate change.

        Re: 2061. It�s not one of Clarke�s greatest books. I think he made a
        mistake of keeping bringing back characters from the first book and upgrading
        the technology far too quickly. Thinking about it, Clarke wasn�t the first
        to suggest comet riding. Some chap called Jules Verne chose a similar route.
        Unfortunately, there are no railways in space. Very few comets are close
        to each other in space and most go outside of the solar system. If you
        planned a round trip you�d never survive. Halley�s Comet takes over 80 years so
        you could barely rock around the clock. :-)

        I�m still puzzled by the American omelette not being a complete piece.
        What I�ve seen on the box we would call scrambled eggs.

        �Theatre Of Blood� was about four years prior to Phibes. Vincent Price, as
        you say, was really talented with an unmistakable voice.

        Re: grammar checkers. There are option controls to allow colloquial speech
        or you would be doomed writing dialogue. They should only be used as a
        guide not run your word processor. If they were bright, then they�d do their
        own writing.

        Re: telepathy. This is the point I was making about recognising body
        language of the people you know about you. A lot of it is unconscious signs. I
        mean, you would know if someone was getting angry and not just by them
        raising their voices.
        As a clinical empath, I can link into anyone near me. Some have higher
        empath reactive response than others and just think they know me which is
        always weird for strangers. I can raise you on the phone link, I can think of
        someone I haven�t seen for a while and within two weeks see them in town.

        Re: writing. The best technique for doing a self-edit is once you�ve
        finished a draft, to go away from it for a week or so and come back with fresh
        eyes. A lot of the mistakes stick out like sore thumbs. I can do that over a
        shorter interval if I�m writing more than one piece at the same time.
        Modifying from a UK perspective to a US one if I�m submitting abroad isn�
        t that difficult. A lot of UK publishers are owned by US publishers these
        days. I doubt if an American publisher would insist on a comma before a �but�
        unless it needed it. The trick is to listen to the sentence. If the tone
        changes, like here for instance, then you know where to put the commas in.

        By the by, I used that example of the scuba gear in my editorial this
        month. Let�s hope not too many people try it for real although head dipping for
        crabs is fun.

        Always remember the human body is the worse case of parallel evolution.

        Geoff

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • galacticprobe
        Geoff, Sorry to be out of touch for so long, but military retirements take up a lot of time: physicals, paperwork, getting with the VA (Veterans Affairs)
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 1, 2010
          Geoff,

          Sorry to be out of touch for so long, but military retirements take up a lot of time: physicals, paperwork, getting with the VA (Veterans' Affairs) people to review records, then going through evaluations to see how much disability you're eligible for. Add to that this vertigo problem that still plagues me as well as a bum leg from that sciatic nerve damage and the meds I'm taking for it all... Fun in a bucket.

          Space travel? I doubt I'll ever do any thanks to my physical state. So I won't be comet hopping (or running from any gate to another; I barely make it walking - I can't run even if I had to). So I'll be planted on Terra Firma until someone kindlt drops a fully operational Police Box on my front doorsteps.

          Eggs: The whole "over easy" terminology simply means the eggs are cooked slightly on one side, and then flipped over to lightly cook the other, usually when someone feel that "sunny side up" doesn't cook the white part enough. However, an over easy egg still has some gooey whites, just not as much as a sunny side up.
          Over medium - a term I never heard until I got stationed in Virginia - is an over easy egg cooked until only the yoke is soft and everything else is firm (my personal favorite.) Over hard is cooked with a broken yoke so nothing is soft, and those are usualy cound on those egg sandwiches.

          Books: I've read quite a few. Not as many as my wife has, mind you, as she's read just about every book written in the English language. I do share your disdain with the misuse of words: neither and either are amongst them. People I went through school with - I know they had to pass the same english and grammer tests that I did - are now misusing words like there, their, they're... "I went to there house for dinner last night." "Their going to the concert tomorrow." And then there is the "your" and "you're" issue. "Your not going with me this time." "That's you're shirt." I won't even get into their horrid disregard for punctuation or capitalization. These people are nearing 50 years old and they're writing like pre-schoolers! Aaaugh!

          As for the SF story I'm working on, I do have a plot outlined. Serious-minded people partially restore an old starship which ends up developing a personality of her own, and is somewhat unreliable, unless there is a crisis; then she operates flawlessly. The crew is sent on a search and rescue mission, and learn that their good friend of years ago had been used as a pattern for a hybernating race of killer androids to revive themselves. Then the crew has to find a way to destroy the androids before the androids destroy Earth and every other planet, turning the inhabitants into "fuel" for their machinery. I wouldn't say that the crew meets with repeated pratfalls, but as they battle the androids they do find themselves in situations so absurd that you can't help but laugh at them. It's a sort of "Star Trek" meets "Get Smart" meets "Operation Petticoat."
          It starts with a somber battle that shows the main characters' feelings and devotion to each other, and the humor aspect creeps in as the story moves along. It's got serious action, some starship battles, weapons shootouts with the androids, and some really bad jokes from one of the characters in dire situations. (As his friends point out to him, they know just how much danger they're in by how bad his jokes get.) It's still a work in progress, and my wife who's read hundreds of SF (and fantasy) books is helping me along with it. So hopefully one day I'll see it on bookstore shelves to augment my retirement pension.
          And because I do need to step away from it now and again, to clear my head, I'm also working on a story set in the 1880s (Historical Fiction, I think it falls into) involving a lady lighthouse keeper and her beau who is the first mate aboard a clipper ship. This one is a bit more serious, but there is still some humor in it (the comic relief sort).

          Dino.

          --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, Geoff Willmetts <gfwillmetts@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hello Dino
          >
          > Space travel doesn't match up to any metaphor. I suspect when long distance space travel is worked out it won't be anything like SF depicts it neither. Not even sure airports would match come to that. You'd have to go to gate 300 more like.
          >
          > Re: American omelettes. Wouldn't make much difference to me. Eggs give me headaches. We can't get over some of the names you chaps call your food. I mean, eggs over easy is just lightly cooked eggs.
          >
          > Re: grammar. It helps if reading is in your blood. `So many books, only one life-time' is my mantra. It helps to have good diction and listening to how things sound.
          > Probably the biggest problem I see amateurs and pros make is confusing `either' and `neither'.
          >
          > I presume you've got at least a skeleton plot laid down before writing?? Doesn't mean you can't deviate but then you'll know that it affects as well.
          > Something that happens with a lot of amateur writers is they run out of steam half-way through. If they can't keep their interest in the story then how can a reader?? When I do my stories, I like to surprise the audience so it keeps me on my toes.
          >
          > Geoff
          >
          >
          > ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
          > Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
          > THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
          > Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!
          >
          > WE DON'T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-
          >
          > AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/
          >
          > ***************************************************
        • Geoff Willmetts
          Hello Dino Glad you’re surviving. Life sometimes takes over. Re: space travel. Who says you need to take your body with you?? I don’t think you need a
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 1, 2010
            Hello Dino

            Glad you�re surviving. Life sometimes takes over.

            Re: space travel. Who says you need to take your body with you?? I don�t think you need a police box. A TARDIS is a different kettle of fish though. As I think I�ve commented, I have a non-operational one. Shame I can�t get fissionable material through customs.

            Re: Eggs. My lot just cook until its done. Do you ever get the thought that your compatriots might be food snobs with such description as to how they want their food cooked??

            Re: Books. Unless your wife is an immortal, then I doubt if she�s read everything. I kinda impressed Bob Greenberger by reading his Essential Superman Encyclopaedia last month but I�ve read such lengthy tomes in the past. By the by, those of you into DC material, it�s a useful reference and I only found four spelling mistakes.

            Re: Your SF story. I think that�s been done a couple times in the Star Trek shows. If you know the plots, make sure you don�t follow the same solutions.
            Don�t think book writing makes big bucks. For time spent, assuming you can find a buyer, you�ll be lucky to break even.

            Geoff


            ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
            Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
            THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
            Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!

            WE DON�T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-

            AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/

            ***************************************************






            To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com
            From: LambuLambu@...
            Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2010 17:14:19 +0000
            Subject: [probe_control] Re: Comets, Eggs, and Vincent (Oh my!)






            Geoff,

            Sorry to be out of touch for so long, but military retirements take up a lot of time: physicals, paperwork, getting with the VA (Veterans' Affairs) people to review records, then going through evaluations to see how much disability you're eligible for. Add to that this vertigo problem that still plagues me as well as a bum leg from that sciatic nerve damage and the meds I'm taking for it all... Fun in a bucket.

            Space travel? I doubt I'll ever do any thanks to my physical state. So I won't be comet hopping (or running from any gate to another; I barely make it walking - I can't run even if I had to). So I'll be planted on Terra Firma until someone kindlt drops a fully operational Police Box on my front doorsteps.

            Eggs: The whole "over easy" terminology simply means the eggs are cooked slightly on one side, and then flipped over to lightly cook the other, usually when someone feel that "sunny side up" doesn't cook the white part enough. However, an over easy egg still has some gooey whites, just not as much as a sunny side up.
            Over medium - a term I never heard until I got stationed in Virginia - is an over easy egg cooked until only the yoke is soft and everything else is firm (my personal favorite.) Over hard is cooked with a broken yoke so nothing is soft, and those are usualy cound on those egg sandwiches.

            Books: I've read quite a few. Not as many as my wife has, mind you, as she's read just about every book written in the English language. I do share your disdain with the misuse of words: neither and either are amongst them. People I went through school with - I know they had to pass the same english and grammer tests that I did - are now misusing words like there, their, they're... "I went to there house for dinner last night." "Their going to the concert tomorrow." And then there is the "your" and "you're" issue. "Your not going with me this time." "That's you're shirt." I won't even get into their horrid disregard for punctuation or capitalization. These people are nearing 50 years old and they're writing like pre-schoolers! Aaaugh!

            As for the SF story I'm working on, I do have a plot outlined. Serious-minded people partially restore an old starship which ends up developing a personality of her own, and is somewhat unreliable, unless there is a crisis; then she operates flawlessly. The crew is sent on a search and rescue mission, and learn that their good friend of years ago had been used as a pattern for a hybernating race of killer androids to revive themselves. Then the crew has to find a way to destroy the androids before the androids destroy Earth and every other planet, turning the inhabitants into "fuel" for their machinery. I wouldn't say that the crew meets with repeated pratfalls, but as they battle the androids they do find themselves in situations so absurd that you can't help but laugh at them. It's a sort of "Star Trek" meets "Get Smart" meets "Operation Petticoat."
            It starts with a somber battle that shows the main characters' feelings and devotion to each other, and the humor aspect creeps in as the story moves along. It's got serious action, some starship battles, weapons shootouts with the androids, and some really bad jokes from one of the characters in dire situations. (As his friends point out to him, they know just how much danger they're in by how bad his jokes get.) It's still a work in progress, and my wife who's read hundreds of SF (and fantasy) books is helping me along with it. So hopefully one day I'll see it on bookstore shelves to augment my retirement pension.
            And because I do need to step away from it now and again, to clear my head, I'm also working on a story set in the 1880s (Historical Fiction, I think it falls into) involving a lady lighthouse keeper and her beau who is the first mate aboard a clipper ship. This one is a bit more serious, but there is still some humor in it (the comic relief sort).

            Dino.

            --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, Geoff Willmetts <gfwillmetts@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hello Dino
            >
            > Space travel doesn't match up to any metaphor. I suspect when long distance space travel is worked out it won't be anything like SF depicts it neither. Not even sure airports would match come to that. You'd have to go to gate 300 more like.
            >
            > Re: American omelettes. Wouldn't make much difference to me. Eggs give me headaches. We can't get over some of the names you chaps call your food. I mean, eggs over easy is just lightly cooked eggs.
            >
            > Re: grammar. It helps if reading is in your blood. `So many books, only one life-time' is my mantra. It helps to have good diction and listening to how things sound.
            > Probably the biggest problem I see amateurs and pros make is confusing `either' and `neither'.
            >
            > I presume you've got at least a skeleton plot laid down before writing?? Doesn't mean you can't deviate but then you'll know that it affects as well.
            > Something that happens with a lot of amateur writers is they run out of steam half-way through. If they can't keep their interest in the story then how can a reader?? When I do my stories, I like to surprise the audience so it keeps me on my toes.
            >
            > Geoff
            >
            >
            > ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
            > Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
            > THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
            > Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!
            >
            > WE DON'T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-
            >
            > AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/
            >
            > ***************************************************





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • LambuLambu@aol.com
            Geoff, Personally, I d like to keep my body with me if I ever made any space travel otherwise I think I d end up falling into the Cyberman category (the only
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 2, 2010
              Geoff,

              Personally, I'd like to keep my body with me if I ever made any space
              travel otherwise I think I'd end up falling into the Cyberman category (the only
              thing creepier than my Aunt Muriel, or a Dalek speaking German). And a
              TARDIS was what I was alluding to with my Police Box reference; I kind of like
              that shape. Mine is also inoperable. That is, really broken; all I've got
              left of it (so far) is the Fresnel lens from the top, and its demat circuit
              which is missing a few pieces. So I'm stuck.

              Some of my compatriots are definitely food snobs. All you need do is walk
              into a Starbuck's Coffee shop to realize that as some 60+ bimbo-wannabe
              walks in dressed like someone in her 20s to order a half caramel macchiato,
              half chocolate mocha, with one "squirt" of cinnamon and half soy milk, with
              half skim... (And yes, I've seen that just the other day. From the back she
              made you think, "Oooh?" But once she turned around it made you go
              "Eeeewwww!" Or to quote Monty Python: "Run away! Run away!"

              My wife isn't quite an Immortal (how I wish) but she has been an avid
              reader since age five. Her father was rather unstable in the head and truly
              believed that a TV was nothing more than a government device used for spying on
              people (like a two-way mirror, specifically used on him) because he was
              trying to get military disability retroactive to his WW II service and they
              didn't want to "pay up". (He was a cook in the Navy "Sea Bees" and never
              suffered any injuries in the line of duty. He was also convinced that people
              were sneaking into his house while he slept to poison his food, so he put
              padlocks on every cabinet and the fridge, and rarely slept so he could keep
              watch.) He was also a bit of a religious freak (no offence intended to any
              religious members of the group) and aside from the spying device believed
              that Satan created the TV for the government's use. He never allowed one in
              the house so my wife learned to read very early on and to this day she can
              read through several books a week, and that's just in the evenings after she
              settles in for the night after supper. On a weekend when she's not working
              she can blast through a book that's an inch thick in a day! Her preference
              is mysteries, but she's read SF, fantasy, documentaries, modern and
              historical romance... You name it, she's probably read it. In high school, with
              the exception of the heavy scientific books she'd read every book in the
              school library before the end of 11th Grade. (Not sure what that equates to in
              UK schools, but it's the 3rd of four years over here.)

              As for my book, I'm definitely steering away from the "Trek" plots. I know
              things like this have been done before which is why I've been working on it
              so much. When I first started it there was no "Next Generation" (et al,
              which debuted a few months after I started) or "Babylon 5" or a new
              "Galactica", and as luck would have it some of those had ideas along the lines I had
              dreamed up. So, more alterations get made. And you're right; finding a
              buyer isn't easy these days unless you happen to be related to someone in the
              publishing business. (What I need is an Alistair Deacon on my side!) Also,
              I hadn't planned on getting rich on it. (I wouldn't complain if it
              happened, but a Tolkien, Stephen King, or J. K. Rowling I will never be.) A
              little more than breaking even, maybe, but I don't think I'll do more than that.
              For all I know it may never go anywhere, but it allows me a little fun.

              Dino.


              In a message dated 11/1/2010 3:56:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
              gfwillmetts@... writes:

              Hello Dino

              Glad you’re surviving. Life sometimes takes over.

              Re: space travel. Who says you need to take your body with you?? I don’t
              think you need a police box. A TARDIS is a different kettle of fish though.
              As I think I’ve commented, I have a non-operational one. Shame I can’t get
              fissionable material through customs.

              Re: Eggs. My lot just cook until its done. Do you ever get the thought
              that your compatriots might be food snobs with such description as to how they
              want their food cooked??

              Re: Books. Unless your wife is an immortal, then I doubt if she’s read
              everything. I kinda impressed Bob Greenberger by reading his Essential
              Superman Encyclopaedia last month but I’ve read such lengthy tomes in the past. By
              the by, those of you into DC material, it’s a useful reference and I only
              found four spelling mistakes.

              Re: Your SF story. I think that’s been done a couple times in the Star
              Trek shows. If you know the plots, make sure you don’t follow the same
              solutions.
              Don’t think book writing makes big bucks. For time spent, assuming you can
              find a buyer, you’ll be lucky to break even.

              Geoff



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Geoff Willmetts
              Hello Dino Re: out of body space travel. You’ve obviously not read any of Frederick Pohl’s Heechee books. I was joshing you about the TARDIS. Despite its
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 2, 2010
                Hello Dino

                Re: out of body space travel. You�ve obviously not read any of Frederick Pohl�s Heechee books.
                I was joshing you about the TARDIS. Despite its look, most generations just call it and even the real thing, a TARDIS these days over here. It was probably the first most surreal-looking time machine.

                As I don�t drink any coffee or tea variants, I�ve never been in such places but I always have a memory of Sally from �Third Rock From The Sun� throwing the froth away from such concoctions.

                You mean there isn�t people watching me through the TV set?? Your wife�s father obviously read �1984�. Does that mean John Logie Baird was Satan??
                As I understand, our British Museum is supposed to keep copies of all books printed and its in excess of a billion hence your wife is unlikely to have read them all.

                Re: your story. I just picked the commonest place where I�d seen the plot. You�ll probably find all major SF TV shows have touched on it from time to time. This is why it pays to keep attention as to what is out there. Just because you started before seeing such shows doesn�t give you any priority over the idea other than making sure it has an original and different solution or outcome.
                I think I�ve commented before that it would probably help your cause more with building up your name by having it seen in short stories in various mags first to show that you have a following to any publisher you approach. To have so much hope on a single first novel is actually the bigger risk.
                Most neo-writers see selling a book as a means to a little money if not some wealth although if you really want to do that, don�t write Science Fiction. You�d make better money from romance.

                Geoff


                ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
                Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
                THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
                Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!

                WE DON�T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-

                AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/

                ***************************************************






                To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com
                From: LambuLambu@...
                Date: Tue, 2 Nov 2010 11:23:39 -0400
                Subject: Re: [probe_control] Re: Comets, Eggs, and Vincent (Oh my!)






                Geoff,

                Personally, I'd like to keep my body with me if I ever made any space
                travel otherwise I think I'd end up falling into the Cyberman category (the only
                thing creepier than my Aunt Muriel, or a Dalek speaking German). And a
                TARDIS was what I was alluding to with my Police Box reference; I kind of like
                that shape. Mine is also inoperable. That is, really broken; all I've got
                left of it (so far) is the Fresnel lens from the top, and its demat circuit
                which is missing a few pieces. So I'm stuck.

                Some of my compatriots are definitely food snobs. All you need do is walk
                into a Starbuck's Coffee shop to realize that as some 60+ bimbo-wannabe
                walks in dressed like someone in her 20s to order a half caramel macchiato,
                half chocolate mocha, with one "squirt" of cinnamon and half soy milk, with
                half skim... (And yes, I've seen that just the other day. From the back she
                made you think, "Oooh?" But once she turned around it made you go
                "Eeeewwww!" Or to quote Monty Python: "Run away! Run away!"

                My wife isn't quite an Immortal (how I wish) but she has been an avid
                reader since age five. Her father was rather unstable in the head and truly
                believed that a TV was nothing more than a government device used for spying on
                people (like a two-way mirror, specifically used on him) because he was
                trying to get military disability retroactive to his WW II service and they
                didn't want to "pay up". (He was a cook in the Navy "Sea Bees" and never
                suffered any injuries in the line of duty. He was also convinced that people
                were sneaking into his house while he slept to poison his food, so he put
                padlocks on every cabinet and the fridge, and rarely slept so he could keep
                watch.) He was also a bit of a religious freak (no offence intended to any
                religious members of the group) and aside from the spying device believed
                that Satan created the TV for the government's use. He never allowed one in
                the house so my wife learned to read very early on and to this day she can
                read through several books a week, and that's just in the evenings after she
                settles in for the night after supper. On a weekend when she's not working
                she can blast through a book that's an inch thick in a day! Her preference
                is mysteries, but she's read SF, fantasy, documentaries, modern and
                historical romance... You name it, she's probably read it. In high school, with
                the exception of the heavy scientific books she'd read every book in the
                school library before the end of 11th Grade. (Not sure what that equates to in
                UK schools, but it's the 3rd of four years over here.)

                As for my book, I'm definitely steering away from the "Trek" plots. I know
                things like this have been done before which is why I've been working on it
                so much. When I first started it there was no "Next Generation" (et al,
                which debuted a few months after I started) or "Babylon 5" or a new
                "Galactica", and as luck would have it some of those had ideas along the lines I had
                dreamed up. So, more alterations get made. And you're right; finding a
                buyer isn't easy these days unless you happen to be related to someone in the
                publishing business. (What I need is an Alistair Deacon on my side!) Also,
                I hadn't planned on getting rich on it. (I wouldn't complain if it
                happened, but a Tolkien, Stephen King, or J. K. Rowling I will never be.) A
                little more than breaking even, maybe, but I don't think I'll do more than that.
                For all I know it may never go anywhere, but it allows me a little fun.

                Dino.


                In a message dated 11/1/2010 3:56:36 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                gfwillmetts@... writes:

                Hello Dino

                Glad you�re surviving. Life sometimes takes over.

                Re: space travel. Who says you need to take your body with you?? I don�t
                think you need a police box. A TARDIS is a different kettle of fish though.
                As I think I�ve commented, I have a non-operational one. Shame I can�t get
                fissionable material through customs.

                Re: Eggs. My lot just cook until its done. Do you ever get the thought
                that your compatriots might be food snobs with such description as to how they
                want their food cooked??

                Re: Books. Unless your wife is an immortal, then I doubt if she�s read
                everything. I kinda impressed Bob Greenberger by reading his Essential
                Superman Encyclopaedia last month but I�ve read such lengthy tomes in the past. By
                the by, those of you into DC material, it�s a useful reference and I only
                found four spelling mistakes.

                Re: Your SF story. I think that�s been done a couple times in the Star
                Trek shows. If you know the plots, make sure you don�t follow the same
                solutions.
                Don�t think book writing makes big bucks. For time spent, assuming you can
                find a buyer, you�ll be lucky to break even.

                Geoff

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • LambuLambu@aol.com
                Geoff, You re right; Frederick Pohl isn t an author I ve read, at least not yet. I ll have to look into some of his works. As far as the TARDIS goes, I applaud
                Message 7 of 9 , Nov 3, 2010
                  Geoff,

                  You're right; Frederick Pohl isn't an author I've read, at least not yet.
                  I'll have to look into some of his works.

                  As far as the TARDIS goes, I applaud the BBC winning the legal battle
                  against the Metropolitan Police to claim the rights to the image of the Police
                  Box, especially since the Beeb kept the image going for more than 40 years
                  after the Met demolished 99% of all Police Boxes in Britain. (Several
                  friends of ours also refer to those blue Port-a-loos as TARDISes.)

                  John Logie Baird? I'll check with the wife on this one. Her best friend
                  from high school is a Baird (at least until she got married) and she might
                  know something if there is a relation. (And this is a mild torment for me...
                  the two girls in high school I wanted most to marry just had to be best
                  friends, and this I didn't learn until after I started dating my wife. It was
                  one of those introduction moments of "It's you?!"... "It's you!") And
                  actually, according to my wife, as far back as she could remember, her father
                  read nothing but the Bible. (The DaVinci Code is nothing in conspiracy
                  theories compared to what he felt was hidden in books.)

                  Speaking of books, I'll ask my wife if she has any idea how many she's read
                  so far. It may not be a billion, but it may come close. If she stops to
                  sit for more than a few seconds, she's got a book in her hands. I seriously
                  hope she never gets into the British Museum; if she finds those books I'll
                  never see her again. (Darned shame about that Library of Alexandria, though,
                  but I had to do SOMETHING to get her out of there!)

                  Dino.


                  In a message dated 11/2/2010 3:37:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                  gfwillmetts@... writes:

                  Hello Dino

                  Re: out of body space travel. You’ve obviously not read any of Frederick
                  Pohl’s Heechee books.
                  I was joshing you about the TARDIS. Despite its look, most generations
                  just call it and even the real thing, a TARDIS these days over here. It was
                  probably the first most surreal-looking time machine.

                  As I don’t drink any coffee or tea variants, I’ve never been in such
                  places but I always have a memory of Sally from ‘Third Rock From The Sun’
                  throwing the froth away from such concoctions.

                  You mean there isn’t people watching me through the TV set?? Your wife’s
                  father obviously read ‘1984’. Does that mean John Logie Baird was Satan??
                  As I understand, our British Museum is supposed to keep copies of all
                  books printed and its in excess of a billion hence your wife is unlikely to
                  have read them all.

                  Re: your story. I just picked the commonest place where I’d seen the plot.
                  You’ll probably find all major SF TV shows have touched on it from time to
                  time. This is why it pays to keep attention as to what is out there. Just
                  because you started before seeing such shows doesn’t give you any priority
                  over the idea other than making sure it has an original and different
                  solution or outcome.
                  I think I’ve commented before that it would probably help your cause more
                  with building up your name by having it seen in short stories in various
                  mags first to show that you have a following to any publisher you approach.
                  To have so much hope on a single first novel is actually the bigger risk.
                  Most neo-writers see selling a book as a means to a little money if not
                  some wealth although if you really want to do that, don’t write Science
                  Fiction. You’d make better money from romance.

                  Geoff



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Geoff Willmetts
                  Hello Dino Fred Pohl is one of the few grand masters of SF still alive. I’m sure others here will give you some recommendations. Apart from the HeeChee
                  Message 8 of 9 , Nov 3, 2010
                    Hello Dino

                    Fred Pohl is one of the few grand masters of SF still alive. I�m sure others here will give you some recommendations. Apart from the HeeChee books, a standalone of his called �Man Plus� will probably give you the most nightmares.

                    Re: TARDIS. It did kinda help that that the police no longer use police boxes like that. The inside of the traditional box was used to take a break in.

                    Baird was a Brit so I doubt if they�re even distant cousins cos it�s a common names. Your wife�s father would have gotten on well with Margaret White, Carrie�s mother if you or she knows the books.

                    You have to have a special library card to get into the British Museum library but you�re not allowed to get them off site.

                    Geoff


                    ********* GF Willmetts ****************************
                    Commissioning Editor: http://www.sfcrowsnest.co.uk or http://www.computercrowsnest.co.uk
                    THE SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY MAGAZINE THE E-BOOK PUBLISHER THAT TRIES HARDER
                    Between 42-48 million hits a month!!!

                    WE DON�T CHOOSE OUR RANK POSITIONS, OTHERS PUT US THERE:-

                    AOL AOL ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://search.aol.com/aolcom/browse?id=906&source=subcats Yahoo Yahoo ranks SFcrowsnest #4 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dir.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/ DMOZ DMOZ ranks SFcrowsnest #1 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://dmoz.org/Arts/Literature/Genres/Science_Fiction/ Google Google ranks SFcrowsnest #2 most popular SFF site on the Internet http://directory.google.com/Top/Arts/Genres/Science_Fiction_and_Fantasy/

                    ***************************************************






                    To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com
                    From: LambuLambu@...
                    Date: Wed, 3 Nov 2010 09:59:11 -0400
                    Subject: Re: [probe_control] Re: Comets, Eggs, and Vincent (Oh my!)






                    Geoff,

                    You're right; Frederick Pohl isn't an author I've read, at least not yet.
                    I'll have to look into some of his works.

                    As far as the TARDIS goes, I applaud the BBC winning the legal battle
                    against the Metropolitan Police to claim the rights to the image of the Police
                    Box, especially since the Beeb kept the image going for more than 40 years
                    after the Met demolished 99% of all Police Boxes in Britain. (Several
                    friends of ours also refer to those blue Port-a-loos as TARDISes.)

                    John Logie Baird? I'll check with the wife on this one. Her best friend
                    from high school is a Baird (at least until she got married) and she might
                    know something if there is a relation. (And this is a mild torment for me...
                    the two girls in high school I wanted most to marry just had to be best
                    friends, and this I didn't learn until after I started dating my wife. It was
                    one of those introduction moments of "It's you?!"... "It's you!") And
                    actually, according to my wife, as far back as she could remember, her father
                    read nothing but the Bible. (The DaVinci Code is nothing in conspiracy
                    theories compared to what he felt was hidden in books.)

                    Speaking of books, I'll ask my wife if she has any idea how many she's read
                    so far. It may not be a billion, but it may come close. If she stops to
                    sit for more than a few seconds, she's got a book in her hands. I seriously
                    hope she never gets into the British Museum; if she finds those books I'll
                    never see her again. (Darned shame about that Library of Alexandria, though,
                    but I had to do SOMETHING to get her out of there!)

                    Dino.


                    In a message dated 11/2/2010 3:37:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                    gfwillmetts@... writes:

                    Hello Dino

                    Re: out of body space travel. You�ve obviously not read any of Frederick
                    Pohl�s Heechee books.
                    I was joshing you about the TARDIS. Despite its look, most generations
                    just call it and even the real thing, a TARDIS these days over here. It was
                    probably the first most surreal-looking time machine.

                    As I don�t drink any coffee or tea variants, I�ve never been in such
                    places but I always have a memory of Sally from �Third Rock From The Sun�
                    throwing the froth away from such concoctions.

                    You mean there isn�t people watching me through the TV set?? Your wife�s
                    father obviously read �1984�. Does that mean John Logie Baird was Satan??
                    As I understand, our British Museum is supposed to keep copies of all
                    books printed and its in excess of a billion hence your wife is unlikely to
                    have read them all.

                    Re: your story. I just picked the commonest place where I�d seen the plot.
                    You�ll probably find all major SF TV shows have touched on it from time to
                    time. This is why it pays to keep attention as to what is out there. Just
                    because you started before seeing such shows doesn�t give you any priority
                    over the idea other than making sure it has an original and different
                    solution or outcome.
                    I think I�ve commented before that it would probably help your cause more
                    with building up your name by having it seen in short stories in various
                    mags first to show that you have a following to any publisher you approach.
                    To have so much hope on a single first novel is actually the bigger risk.
                    Most neo-writers see selling a book as a means to a little money if not
                    some wealth although if you really want to do that, don�t write Science
                    Fiction. You�d make better money from romance.

                    Geoff

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • LambuLambu@aol.com
                    Geoff, I don t do well with nightmares, so... I may pass on Fred Pohl (like I stay away from Stephen King!). I managed to download quite large plans of the
                    Message 9 of 9 , Nov 3, 2010
                      Geoff,

                      I don't do well with nightmares, so... I may pass on Fred Pohl (like I
                      stay away from Stephen King!).

                      I managed to download quite large plans of the original Police Boxes a
                      while back. The inside looked rather functional, and comfortable: desk,
                      phone, stool. It's a shame they did away with them.

                      Baird might be a fairly common name, but there could still be some
                      relation along the lines. I've been playing about on Ancestry.com and just
                      learned that I've got lineage stemming from Stokes, Kerwin, O'Sullivan,
                      McLaughlin, and McNamara, who all came from Ireland (paternal grandmother's
                      side), along with a Corcoran from Canada. I haven't even scratched the Italian
                      part (paternal grandfather) and found out that my great-grandfather's mother
                      was French (surname Antoinette, I forget the provence she came from). And
                      then there's my mother's side: German, Swiss, and Slovak. So who knows? My
                      wife worked with a woman whose maiden name was Stallone; three guesses who
                      her cousin is? And when I was teaching Electronics for the Coast Guard, one
                      of my students was a Campbell: first cousin of Doug Campbell (Howie of
                      "The Fall Guy" TV series, and the resemblance was amazing!). Relation can pop
                      up anywhere.

                      If I didn't know better, I would say that someone based Carrie's
                      mother on my father-in-law. Things were that scary. There were times when I was
                      dating my wife that I went to visit her at her house and was greeted at the
                      door by her father, who, as I entered the house, gave me a piece of paper
                      on which was written "Say nothing. Write everything down. I've just
                      discovered this house is being wiretapped." I had to stay for at least 20 minutes,
                      or the people "watching" his house would be convinced that I'd come for
                      some evidence that he was holding and was then going to deliver it to some
                      "authority" which would be able to shut down "their" operation. (We never knew
                      who "they" were. It was almost like living "The Prisoner"!) My wife wanted
                      to go out of the house with me, but wasn't allowed because he knew she
                      would be followed, and through the places she went with me "they" would figure
                      out what he was up to, and try to kill him in some fashion. Even the local
                      police had been bought and were in on it, as were the doctors at the
                      hospital who would certify that his death was from "natural causes" after they
                      poisoned him (by sneaking into his house at night). He didn't even come to
                      our wedding because he knew the priest was also "on the payroll". (I don't
                      think my wife was ever so happy as on our wedding day and she got to move
                      out!)

                      Getting into the British Museum Library? No problem! Psychic paper:
                      I'm looking at it now. It says I'm an inspector for the Ministry of Museum
                      Libraries, to be granted full access to all areas and documents. (Huge wink!)
                      Besides, if we were able to get in, my wife wouldn't care if the books
                      couldn't leave. She'd find a suitable chair and plant herself in it, and not
                      get up until either she finished the book, or nature called.

                      Dino.


                      In a message dated 11/3/2010 3:31:26 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                      gfwillmetts@... writes:

                      Hello Dino

                      Fred Pohl is one of the few grand masters of SF still alive. I’m sure
                      others here will give you some recommendations. Apart from the HeeChee books, a
                      standalone of his called ‘Man Plus’ will probably give you the most
                      nightmares.

                      Re: TARDIS. It did kinda help that that the police no longer use police
                      boxes like that. The inside of the traditional box was used to take a break
                      in.

                      Baird was a Brit so I doubt if they’re even distant cousins cos it’s a
                      common names. Your wife’s father would have gotten on well with Margaret
                      White, Carrie’s mother if you or she knows the books.

                      You have to have a special library card to get into the British Museum
                      library but you’re not allowed to get them off site.

                      Geoff



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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