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2003 Hugh O'Brian online interview re deafness

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  • dghprobe3
    http://www.healthyhearing.com/hearing_library/interview_content.asp? interview_id=111 Hugh O Brian interviewed 2-24-03 (snip) O Brian: Wyatt Earp was a fun
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 28, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      http://www.healthyhearing.com/hearing_library/interview_content.asp?
      interview_id=111

      Hugh O'Brian interviewed 2-24-03

      (snip)

      O'Brian: Wyatt Earp was a fun show to do, and a big part of my life.
      However, I developed a hearing problem due to the show and I didn't
      do anything about it for many, many years. In film, TV or motion
      pictures, when you shoot off guns and explosions they involve what
      they called quarter loads, which is one quarter of a full 45 shot.
      And it was enough of a pop that the gun went off and there was smoke
      coming out. So the quarter load made it look, feel and sound somewhat
      realistic. Sometimes, they even dubbed in additional sound later. But
      I was a stickler for authenticity and I wanted to make the show as
      realistic as possible. I insisted on using full loads, so for the
      Wyatt Earp show, it was a full 45 going off! Of course, that made the
      gunfire pretty realistic, but it also impacted my hearing, and that's
      when the trouble started.

      HH/Beck: I guess we should point out that gunfire in a TV western is
      not a once a day event. Seems to me like there's a good chance you
      could be firing those weapons many dozens of times daily?

      O'Brian: Oh sure. We easily did, on the average, maybe 100 rounds of
      ammunition a day for each episode over a period of years and I
      gradually blew out my hearing. Thankfully, the crew and everyone
      behind the camera wore ear muffs. I started to develop a hearing
      problem, and it really didn't bother me that much until the 1960's.
      But I did an awful lot of action films and action television shows.
      And my hearing just went downhill until it was almost impossible to
      hear people talking.

      HH/Beck: And at that point, late in the 1960s, you went to see Dr
      Howard House in Los Angeles.

      O'Brian: Yes. I went to see Howard House for the first time and
      Howard became a dear friend and a big help to me. I had my first set
      of hearing aids in 1968 or maybe 1969. Over the years, as the hearing
      aids improved, I was able to get more and more out of them.

      HH/Beck: So you've been wearing hearing aids from the early days of
      analog technology and some fairly large units, all the way into the
      digital age with the really small completely-in-the canal models?

      O'Brian: Yes. I've seen lots of improvements in hearing aids over the
      years, and that's been great – because I do have to wear them! I mean
      I do have a hearing problem, and the hearing aids don't bother me at
      all.

      HH/Beck: Do you wear one or two hearing aids?

      O'Brian: Usually I just wear one if I'm going about my day-to-day
      routine. However, If I'm in a board meeting,or an important event
      where I really need to hear accurately the first time, and that
      happens a lot that, then I usually wear two.

      (snip)
    • Actingman
      Be interesting to know if it ever crossed his mind that in Search he might have actually been demonstrating the future of hearing aids.
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 29, 2008
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        Be interesting to know if it ever crossed his mind that in Search he
        might have actually been demonstrating the future of hearing aids.


        dghprobe3 wrote:
        >
        > http://www.healthyhearing.com/hearing_library/interview_content.asp?
        > <http://www.healthyhearing.com/hearing_library/interview_content.asp?>
        > interview_id=111
        >
        > Hugh O'Brian interviewed 2-24-03
        >
        > (snip)
        >
        > O'Brian: Wyatt Earp was a fun show to do, and a big part of my life.
        > However, I developed a hearing problem due to the show and I didn't
        > do anything about it for many, many years. In film, TV or motion
        > pictures, when you shoot off guns and explosions they involve what
        > they called quarter loads, which is one quarter of a full 45 shot.
        > And it was enough of a pop that the gun went off and there was smoke
        > coming out. So the quarter load made it look, feel and sound somewhat
        > realistic. Sometimes, they even dubbed in additional sound later. But
        > I was a stickler for authenticity and I wanted to make the show as
        > realistic as possible. I insisted on using full loads, so for the
        > Wyatt Earp show, it was a full 45 going off! Of course, that made the
        > gunfire pretty realistic, but it also impacted my hearing, and that's
        > when the trouble started.
        >
        > HH/Beck: I guess we should point out that gunfire in a TV western is
        > not a once a day event. Seems to me like there's a good chance you
        > could be firing those weapons many dozens of times daily?
        >
        > O'Brian: Oh sure. We easily did, on the average, maybe 100 rounds of
        > ammunition a day for each episode over a period of years and I
        > gradually blew out my hearing. Thankfully, the crew and everyone
        > behind the camera wore ear muffs. I started to develop a hearing
        > problem, and it really didn't bother me that much until the 1960's.
        > But I did an awful lot of action films and action television shows.
        > And my hearing just went downhill until it was almost impossible to
        > hear people talking.
        >
        > HH/Beck: And at that point, late in the 1960s, you went to see Dr
        > Howard House in Los Angeles.
        >
        > O'Brian: Yes. I went to see Howard House for the first time and
        > Howard became a dear friend and a big help to me. I had my first set
        > of hearing aids in 1968 or maybe 1969. Over the years, as the hearing
        > aids improved, I was able to get more and more out of them.
        >
        > HH/Beck: So you've been wearing hearing aids from the early days of
        > analog technology and some fairly large units, all the way into the
        > digital age with the really small completely-in-the canal models?
        >
        > O'Brian: Yes. I've seen lots of improvements in hearing aids over the
        > years, and that's been great – because I do have to wear them! I mean
        > I do have a hearing problem, and the hearing aids don't bother me at
        > all.
        >
        > HH/Beck: Do you wear one or two hearing aids?
        >
        > O'Brian: Usually I just wear one if I'm going about my day-to-day
        > routine. However, If I'm in a board meeting,or an important event
        > where I really need to hear accurately the first time, and that
        > happens a lot that, then I usually wear two.
        >
        > (snip)
        >
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