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Re: I Will Try It Here

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  • Keith
    You d be surprised at how much stuff is hidden underground at a production studio. Cables, ventilation, drains, etc. The floor that you see is rarely ground
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 14, 2006
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      You'd be surprised at how much stuff is hidden underground at a
      production studio. Cables, ventilation, drains, etc. The floor that
      you see is rarely ground level in the first place.

      They blimp sound in some cases by filling the deadspace with sand or
      laying the floor on concrete joists. Some ground level, drive-in
      stages are built over basement spaces -- strong enough to take the
      weight of a truck (and EMPTY truck), 20 feet above the real floor.

      If you think that's bad, look UP sometime.


      --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, actingman6@... wrote:
      >
      > I know the two levels were seperate units (in fact I think they were
      even on
      > different sound stages). But again, for the upper level, you had
      the ladder
      > and the elevator, which went way below the level of the studio
      floor...so
      > was it an opening that already existed in the sound stage floor (and
      they
      > had to construct the ship set around that opening)? Did they chop
      open a
      > hole in the studio floor and dig up the ground and create a space
      for the
      > elevator and the ladder area? (There was enough room down there they
      put in
      > a wine rack and called it Guy Williams private wine cellar.)
      >
      > On 11/14/06, yorktowncmdr@... <yorktowncmdr@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > I can cite this as an example:
      > >
      > > The Jupiter 2's upper and lower deck were both on the same level
      on the
      > > stage. When shooting an actor on the elevater we see him/her
      descending on
      > > the platform. In reality it leads to a lower room used for a work and
      > > maintenance. The shooting follows with the actor being shot
      descending the
      > > duplicate elevator platform on the adjacent set. The J2 upper and
      lower
      > > decks were not stacked as they lead us to believe.
      > >
      > > David
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: swhite228@... <swhite228%40att.net>
      > > To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com <probe_control%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Mon, 13 Nov 2006 10:55 PM
      > > Subject: [probe_control] Re: I Will Try It Here
      > >
      > > I'll take a shot at this........
      > > The easy answer is that not all sound stages were built at ground
      > > level.
      > >
      > > There are some with pool areas under them that have been used for
      > > basements, lower decks,you name it.
      > >
      > > Some sets have been built on platforms so they could have trap doors
      > > or evevators. Sound is a problem but as any theater major will tell
      > > you padding between the floor beams and the floor will cut the noise
      > > to exceptable levels.
      > >
      > > Then there is the stairway to nowhere...a good example of that
      > > is "That 70's Show".. the basement set has stairs going up to the
      > > ground floor, and steps down from the outside to the basment floor.
      > >
      > > In the real world the stairs up ended with a platform that included
      > > the stairs down.
      > >
      > > Scott
      > >
      > > --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com
      <probe_control%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > > "actingman_jc" <actingman6@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > On a Time Tunnel list someone who visited 20th Century Fox as a kid
      > > is
      > > > sharing photos he took back then, and answering questions about the
      > > > studio (his dad was in the business working on Peyton Place at the
      > > time.)
      > > >
      > > > I asked the following question, but have not gotten an answer, so I
      > > > want to throw it here to our Hollywood friends:
      > > >
      > > > -------------------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > I have always assumed that the soundstages out in California were on
      > > > ground level.
      > > >
      > > > There have been shows where the actors had to regularly on-camera go
      > > > below the surface of the standing set (Flying Sub hatch on Voyage,
      > > the
      > > > elevator and the ladder on the upper deck of the Jupiter 2, the
      > > tunnel
      > > > entrances on Hogan's Heroes,the corner triangular ladder in the
      > > > corridor of the Enterprise in Trek TOS, etc.)
      > > >
      > > > If the soundstage was on ground level, did they excavate the area
      > > > under the stage to make the appropriate space?
      > > >
      > > > Were the sets built on tall platforms to allow enough space
      > > underneath
      > > > to allow hatches, elevators, ect?
      > > >
      > > > Did the soundstages have certain areas that were already dug out and
      > > > so they had to plan the sets around these "trap-door areas"
      > > >
      > > > When you look at the Jupiter 2 from the outside, the ship sitting
      > > > there does not look high enough off the ground to allow for people
      > > to
      > > > go all the way down the ladder, much less the elevator.
      > > >
      > > > I question the platform theory because it would cost extra money to
      > > > build the set strongly enough so that it was properly soundproofed
      > > to
      > > > allow walking and dialog at the same time without echoing footsteps.
      > > >
      > > > Digging up the floor and excavating a "basement"? That has obvious
      > > > problems as well.
      > > >
      > > > ---------------------------------------
      > > >
      > > > Anyway...that is my question as I posed it on the other list. Any
      > > takers?
      > > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > > __________________________________________________________
      > > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
      security
      > > tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across
      the web,
      > > free AOL Mail and more.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Robert J. Sawyer
      I mention this only because Probe Control was modeled after the Apollo-era Mission Control Center in Houston. I was fortunate enough to get to visit that
      Message 2 of 12 , Nov 17, 2006
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        I mention this only because Probe Control was modeled after the
        Apollo-era Mission Control Center in Houston. I was fortunate enough
        to get to visit that room, which is preserved as a historic site, last
        year. Like Probe Control (in the early episodes when it was dimly
        lit) Mission Control always had a subterranean feel to it, as seen on
        TV. But it turns out that it's on the second floor of the Johnson
        Space Center -- because of the need to run all sorts of cables, etc.,
        underneath the consoles.

        (It's also in the middle of the building, with no outside walls, to
        protect it from hurricane damage.)

        Cheers,

        Rob

        ----------------
        ROBERT J. SAWYER, Science Fiction Writer

        Hugo Award winner for HOMINIDS
        Nebula Award winner for THE TERMINAL EXPERIMENT
        John W. Campbell Memorial Award winner for MINDSCAN

        http://www.sfwriter.com * sawyer@...
        ----------------



        --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, "Keith" <graphotypist@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > You'd be surprised at how much stuff is hidden underground at a
        > production studio. Cables, ventilation, drains, etc. The floor that
        > you see is rarely ground level in the first place.
        >
        > They blimp sound in some cases by filling the deadspace with sand or
        > laying the floor on concrete joists. Some ground level, drive-in
        > stages are built over basement spaces -- strong enough to take the
        > weight of a truck (and EMPTY truck), 20 feet above the real floor.
        >
        > If you think that's bad, look UP sometime.
        >
        >
        > --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, actingman6@ wrote:
        > >
        > > I know the two levels were seperate units (in fact I think they were
        > even on
        > > different sound stages). But again, for the upper level, you had
        > the ladder
        > > and the elevator, which went way below the level of the studio
        > floor...so
        > > was it an opening that already existed in the sound stage floor (and
        > they
        > > had to construct the ship set around that opening)? Did they chop
        > open a
        > > hole in the studio floor and dig up the ground and create a space
        > for the
        > > elevator and the ladder area? (There was enough room down there they
        > put in
        > > a wine rack and called it Guy Williams private wine cellar.)
        > >
        > > On 11/14/06, yorktowncmdr@ <yorktowncmdr@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I can cite this as an example:
        > > >
        > > > The Jupiter 2's upper and lower deck were both on the same level
        > on the
        > > > stage. When shooting an actor on the elevater we see him/her
        > descending on
        > > > the platform. In reality it leads to a lower room used for a
        work and
        > > > maintenance. The shooting follows with the actor being shot
        > descending the
        > > > duplicate elevator platform on the adjacent set. The J2 upper and
        > lower
        > > > decks were not stacked as they lead us to believe.
        > > >
        > > > David
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > -----Original Message-----
        > > > From: swhite228@ <swhite228%40att.net>
        > > > To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com <probe_control%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > Sent: Mon, 13 Nov 2006 10:55 PM
        > > > Subject: [probe_control] Re: I Will Try It Here
        > > >
        > > > I'll take a shot at this........
        > > > The easy answer is that not all sound stages were built at ground
        > > > level.
        > > >
        > > > There are some with pool areas under them that have been used for
        > > > basements, lower decks,you name it.
        > > >
        > > > Some sets have been built on platforms so they could have trap doors
        > > > or evevators. Sound is a problem but as any theater major will tell
        > > > you padding between the floor beams and the floor will cut the noise
        > > > to exceptable levels.
        > > >
        > > > Then there is the stairway to nowhere...a good example of that
        > > > is "That 70's Show".. the basement set has stairs going up to the
        > > > ground floor, and steps down from the outside to the basment floor.
        > > >
        > > > In the real world the stairs up ended with a platform that included
        > > > the stairs down.
        > > >
        > > > Scott
        > > >
        > > > --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com
        > <probe_control%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > > > "actingman_jc" <actingman6@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > On a Time Tunnel list someone who visited 20th Century Fox as
        a kid
        > > > is
        > > > > sharing photos he took back then, and answering questions
        about the
        > > > > studio (his dad was in the business working on Peyton Place at the
        > > > time.)
        > > > >
        > > > > I asked the following question, but have not gotten an answer,
        so I
        > > > > want to throw it here to our Hollywood friends:
        > > > >
        > > > > -------------------------------------------------
        > > > >
        > > > > I have always assumed that the soundstages out in California
        were on
        > > > > ground level.
        > > > >
        > > > > There have been shows where the actors had to regularly
        on-camera go
        > > > > below the surface of the standing set (Flying Sub hatch on Voyage,
        > > > the
        > > > > elevator and the ladder on the upper deck of the Jupiter 2, the
        > > > tunnel
        > > > > entrances on Hogan's Heroes,the corner triangular ladder in the
        > > > > corridor of the Enterprise in Trek TOS, etc.)
        > > > >
        > > > > If the soundstage was on ground level, did they excavate the area
        > > > > under the stage to make the appropriate space?
        > > > >
        > > > > Were the sets built on tall platforms to allow enough space
        > > > underneath
        > > > > to allow hatches, elevators, ect?
        > > > >
        > > > > Did the soundstages have certain areas that were already dug
        out and
        > > > > so they had to plan the sets around these "trap-door areas"
        > > > >
        > > > > When you look at the Jupiter 2 from the outside, the ship sitting
        > > > > there does not look high enough off the ground to allow for people
        > > > to
        > > > > go all the way down the ladder, much less the elevator.
        > > > >
        > > > > I question the platform theory because it would cost extra
        money to
        > > > > build the set strongly enough so that it was properly soundproofed
        > > > to
        > > > > allow walking and dialog at the same time without echoing
        footsteps.
        > > > >
        > > > > Digging up the floor and excavating a "basement"? That has obvious
        > > > > problems as well.
        > > > >
        > > > > ---------------------------------------
        > > > >
        > > > > Anyway...that is my question as I posed it on the other list. Any
        > > > takers?
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > > __________________________________________________________
        > > > Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
        > security
        > > > tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across
        > the web,
        > > > free AOL Mail and more.
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
      • Skip Brown
        I never took much care to wonder about the maps, diagrams, or designs of the Jupiter II on Lost In Space . I was just a kid, enjoying a cool science fiction
        Message 3 of 12 , Nov 18, 2006
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          I never took much care to wonder about the maps, diagrams, or designs of the
          Jupiter II on "Lost In Space". I was just a kid, enjoying a cool science
          fiction show. Besides, I was too busy having my first crush on Angela
          Cartwright (Penny Robinson).

          Alas, a 5 year old, with a crush on an older woman!



          Skip



          From: probe_control@yahoogroups.com [mailto:probe_control@yahoogroups.com]
          On Behalf Of yorktowncmdr@...
          Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2006 12:32 PM
          To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [probe_control] Re: I Will Try It Here



          I can cite this as an example:

          The Jupiter 2's upper and lower deck were both on the same level on the
          stage. When shooting an actor on the elevater we see him/her descending on
          the platform. In reality it leads to a lower room used for a work and
          maintenance. The shooting follows with the actor being shot descending the
          duplicate elevator platform on the adjacent set. The J2 upper and lower
          decks were not stacked as they lead us to believe.

          David






          -----Original Message-----
          From: swhite228@... <mailto:swhite228%40att.net>
          To: probe_control@yahoogroups.com <mailto:probe_control%40yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, 13 Nov 2006 10:55 PM
          Subject: [probe_control] Re: I Will Try It Here

          I'll take a shot at this........
          The easy answer is that not all sound stages were built at ground
          level.

          There are some with pool areas under them that have been used for
          basements, lower decks,you name it.

          Some sets have been built on platforms so they could have trap doors
          or evevators. Sound is a problem but as any theater major will tell
          you padding between the floor beams and the floor will cut the noise
          to exceptable levels.

          Then there is the stairway to nowhere...a good example of that
          is "That 70's Show".. the basement set has stairs going up to the
          ground floor, and steps down from the outside to the basment floor.

          In the real world the stairs up ended with a platform that included
          the stairs down.

          Scott

          --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:probe_control%40yahoogroups.com> , "actingman_jc" <actingman6@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > On a Time Tunnel list someone who visited 20th Century Fox as a kid
          is
          > sharing photos he took back then, and answering questions about the
          > studio (his dad was in the business working on Peyton Place at the
          time.)
          >
          > I asked the following question, but have not gotten an answer, so I
          > want to throw it here to our Hollywood friends:
          >
          > -------------------------------------------------
          >
          > I have always assumed that the soundstages out in California were on
          > ground level.
          >
          > There have been shows where the actors had to regularly on-camera go
          > below the surface of the standing set (Flying Sub hatch on Voyage,
          the
          > elevator and the ladder on the upper deck of the Jupiter 2, the
          tunnel
          > entrances on Hogan's Heroes,the corner triangular ladder in the
          > corridor of the Enterprise in Trek TOS, etc.)
          >
          > If the soundstage was on ground level, did they excavate the area
          > under the stage to make the appropriate space?
          >
          > Were the sets built on tall platforms to allow enough space
          underneath
          > to allow hatches, elevators, ect?
          >
          > Did the soundstages have certain areas that were already dug out and
          > so they had to plan the sets around these "trap-door areas"
          >
          > When you look at the Jupiter 2 from the outside, the ship sitting
          > there does not look high enough off the ground to allow for people
          to
          > go all the way down the ladder, much less the elevator.
          >
          > I question the platform theory because it would cost extra money to
          > build the set strongly enough so that it was properly soundproofed
          to
          > allow walking and dialog at the same time without echoing footsteps.
          >
          > Digging up the floor and excavating a "basement"? That has obvious
          > problems as well.
          >
          > ---------------------------------------
          >
          > Anyway...that is my question as I posed it on the other list. Any
          takers?
          >

          Yahoo! Groups Links

          __________________________________________________________
          Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and security
          tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from across the web,
          free AOL Mail and more.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • yorktowncmdr@aol.com
          For me it was Marta Kristen as Judy. David ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 12 , Nov 19, 2006
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            For me it was Marta Kristen as Judy.

            David

            > I never took much care to wonder about the maps, diagrams, or designs of
            > the
            > Jupiter II on "Lost In Space". I was just a kid, enjoying a cool science
            > fiction show. Besides, I was too busy having my first crush on Angela
            > Cartwright (Penny Robinson).
            >
            > Alas, a 5 year old, with a crush on an older woman!
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Bob Greenberger
            I hated Lost in Space and much preferred its competition on ABC - Batman! And my first crush was, you guessed it, Yvonne Craig as Batgirl. [Non-text portions
            Message 5 of 12 , Nov 19, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              I hated Lost in Space and much preferred its competition on ABC - Batman!
              And my first crush was, you guessed it, Yvonne Craig as Batgirl.








              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Geoff Willmetts
              Hello Jim Explaining the changes is really more me applying internal logic to the series than the TV company politics. It s such a simple solution really. Even
              Message 6 of 12 , Nov 19, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello Jim

                Explaining the changes is really more me applying internal logic to the
                series than the TV company politics. It's such a simple solution really.
                Even having bright lights can have an internal logic. When the lights are
                down, it makes it easier for Gloria to make remarks without getting a stare
                from Cameron. Maybe some of the others were eating popcorn while they were
                watching. :-)

                Geoff





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