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Scanner Power

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  • galacticprobe
    Greetings, All, I had a thought the other day; working with electronics for so long one doesn t stop to actually think of the basics anymore, it becomes just
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
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      Greetings, All,

      I had a thought the other day; working with electronics for so
      long one doesn't stop to actually "think" of the basics anymore, it
      becomes just routine & one ignores it much like one ignores tying
      shoes (it happens almost on its own).

      Anyway, since the scanner is magnetic, assuming the magnet is at
      the back where it "attaches" to the ring, neck chain, etc., a coil of
      fine wire wrapping around the inside of the casing - such as one for
      its antenna - would be subjected to the magnet's lines of flux
      (technical term for magnetic field).

      Anyone familiar with basic electronics (or electricity) knows that
      a wire coil exposed to a megnetic field in just the right way has a
      voltage induced into the coil. While something on the scanner's scale
      wouldn't produce all that much power, it might provide enough for the
      scanner to "idle" on its own when it's not receiving power
      transmission from Probe Control. Those transmissions (in the form of
      radio waves) could feasibly provide the extra power needed for normal
      scanner operation as they also induce voltage in the antenna coil.
      (Like ordinary radio waves provide the power for crystal radio
      reception - no power source other than the radio signal yet the
      crystal receiver still works.)

      I'm not an engineer & even thinking about how it would all work
      together with the varying power levels Control sends out to operate
      the different scanner functions makes my brain hurt. But the theory
      seems somewhat realistic.

      Well, enough of my babbling for now.
      End Run,
      Dino
    • probecontrol@sigecom.net
      I m about as far as one could get from an engineer too, Dino-- but the implications sound fascinating! It s not babbling at ALL! Thanks for sharing your
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
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        I'm about as far as one could get from an engineer too, Dino--
        but the implications sound fascinating!

        It's not 'babbling' at ALL! Thanks for sharing your thoughts
        with the list!

        Jim Alexander
        ==================================
        >Greetings, All,
        >
        > I had a thought the other day; working with electronics
        for so
        >long one doesn't stop to actually "think" of the basics
        anymore, it
        >becomes just routine & one ignores it much like one ignores
        tying
        >shoes (it happens almost on its own).
        >
        > Anyway, since the scanner is magnetic, assuming the
        magnet is at
        >the back where it "attaches" to the ring, neck chain, etc.,
        a coil of
        >fine wire wrapping around the inside of the casing - such as
        one for
        >its antenna - would be subjected to the magnet's lines of
        flux
        >(technical term for magnetic field).
        >
        > Anyone familiar with basic electronics (or electricity)
        knows that
        >a wire coil exposed to a megnetic field in just the right
        way has a
        >voltage induced into the coil. While something on the
        scanner's scale
        >wouldn't produce all that much power, it might provide
        enough for the
        >scanner to "idle" on its own when it's not receiving power
        >transmission from Probe Control. Those transmissions (in the
        form of
        >radio waves) could feasibly provide the extra power needed
        for normal
        >scanner operation as they also induce voltage in the antenna
        coil.
        >(Like ordinary radio waves provide the power for crystal
        radio
        >reception - no power source other than the radio signal yet
        the
        >crystal receiver still works.)
        >
        > I'm not an engineer & even thinking about how it would
        all work
        >together with the varying power levels Control sends out to
        operate
        >the different scanner functions makes my brain hurt. But the
        theory
        >seems somewhat realistic.
        >
        >Well, enough of my babbling for now.
        >End Run,
        >Dino
      • Morningstar
        One thought: The scanner is a transmitter, not a receiver. The receiver is in the agent s head, along with his dental contacts for clandestine transmissions.
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
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          One thought: The scanner is a transmitter, not a receiver. The
          receiver is in the agent's head, along with his dental contacts for
          clandestine transmissions.


          --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, "galacticprobe"
          <LambuLambu@a...> wrote:
          >
          > Greetings, All,
          >
          > I had a thought the other day; working with electronics for so
          > long one doesn't stop to actually "think" of the basics anymore, it
          > becomes just routine & one ignores it much like one ignores tying
          > shoes (it happens almost on its own).
          >
          > Anyway, since the scanner is magnetic, assuming the magnet is at
          > the back where it "attaches" to the ring, neck chain, etc., a coil of
          > fine wire wrapping around the inside of the casing - such as one for
          > its antenna - would be subjected to the magnet's lines of flux
          > (technical term for magnetic field).
          >
          > Anyone familiar with basic electronics (or electricity) knows that
          > a wire coil exposed to a megnetic field in just the right way has a
          > voltage induced into the coil. While something on the scanner's scale
          > wouldn't produce all that much power, it might provide enough for the
          > scanner to "idle" on its own when it's not receiving power
          > transmission from Probe Control. Those transmissions (in the form of
          > radio waves) could feasibly provide the extra power needed for normal
          > scanner operation as they also induce voltage in the antenna coil.
          > (Like ordinary radio waves provide the power for crystal radio
          > reception - no power source other than the radio signal yet the
          > crystal receiver still works.)
          >
          > I'm not an engineer & even thinking about how it would all work
          > together with the varying power levels Control sends out to operate
          > the different scanner functions makes my brain hurt. But the theory
          > seems somewhat realistic.
          >
          > Well, enough of my babbling for now.
          > End Run,
          > Dino
          >
        • Mike
          Hello All, I was just thinking about how much power cell phones put out nowadays? I don t think it s that much, milliwatts? Or even my GPS, it recieves my
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 2, 2005
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            Hello All,

            I was just thinking about how much power cell phones put out
            nowadays? I don't think it's that much, milliwatts? Or even my GPS,
            it recieves my signal then xmits it back to the GPS reciever, again,
            milliwatts?

            With that in mind, I wonder how much power it would really take to
            get a clear signal from a Scanner to a satellite.

            Oh Well, Just a thought.

            Good Day All.

            kc8nqa





            --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, "Morningstar" <am2star@r...>
            wrote:
            >
            > One thought: The scanner is a transmitter, not a receiver. The
            > receiver is in the agent's head, along with his dental contacts for
            > clandestine transmissions.
            >
            >
            > --- In probe_control@yahoogroups.com, "galacticprobe"
            > <LambuLambu@a...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Greetings, All,
            > >
            > > I had a thought the other day; working with electronics for
            so
            > > long one doesn't stop to actually "think" of the basics anymore,
            it
            > > becomes just routine & one ignores it much like one ignores
            tying
            > > shoes (it happens almost on its own).
            > >
            > > Anyway, since the scanner is magnetic, assuming the magnet is
            at
            > > the back where it "attaches" to the ring, neck chain, etc., a
            coil of
            > > fine wire wrapping around the inside of the casing - such as one
            for
            > > its antenna - would be subjected to the magnet's lines of flux
            > > (technical term for magnetic field).
            > >
            > > Anyone familiar with basic electronics (or electricity) knows
            that
            > > a wire coil exposed to a megnetic field in just the right way
            has a
            > > voltage induced into the coil. While something on the scanner's
            scale
            > > wouldn't produce all that much power, it might provide enough
            for the
            > > scanner to "idle" on its own when it's not receiving power
            > > transmission from Probe Control. Those transmissions (in the
            form of
            > > radio waves) could feasibly provide the extra power needed for
            normal
            > > scanner operation as they also induce voltage in the antenna
            coil.
            > > (Like ordinary radio waves provide the power for crystal radio
            > > reception - no power source other than the radio signal yet the
            > > crystal receiver still works.)
            > >
            > > I'm not an engineer & even thinking about how it would all
            work
            > > together with the varying power levels Control sends out to
            operate
            > > the different scanner functions makes my brain hurt. But the
            theory
            > > seems somewhat realistic.
            > >
            > > Well, enough of my babbling for now.
            > > End Run,
            > > Dino
            > >
            >
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