Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Widescreen Letterboxing

Expand Messages
  • probecontrol@sigecom.net
    ... something that wasn t done that way. If anything, the people responsible for the idea will go to other jobs away from marketing because of it. To some
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 7, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Geoff wrote:
      >... I'm in total agreement with you about letter-boxing
      something that wasn't done that way. If anything, the people
      responsible for the idea will go to other jobs away from
      marketing because of it. To some extent, it isn't educating
      people not to buying them though.
      ===========================
      Just to be clear about it (and perhaps I wasn't in my other e-
      mail regarding this)...

      I didn't mean 'educating' people NOT TO BUY a particular
      release (in this case, KUNG FU, which has been widescreened
      from it's original full-frame, and therefore has the top and
      bottom cut literally sliced away--depriving consumers of a
      portion of the picture they originally saw).

      What I really meant was--educating them that they're actually
      being DEPRIVED of part of the picture in this particular case.

      I understand the need for people with widescreen TV's to be
      pleased... but there's GOT to be a better way to DO it. :)
      ===========================
      >... its possible for a DVD to be sold combining both formats
      together without duplicating the product on the disk leaving
      both options open depending what TV you own.
      ===========================
      If this is true, then it would be a viable solution.

      Don't get me wrong. I 'supported' the KUNG FU release, and
      purchased it myself. Did I LIKE what I was buying? Not any
      more than I liked buying full-screen films of my favorite
      movies BEFORE letterboxed editions were available. But if
      it's the ONLY way to get it... then I'll buy.

      Jim Alexander
    • dghprobe3
      Hi Jim: The discussion about letterboxing reminds me of the time I was in a Blockbuster Video a few years ago. A customer walked in with a tape he rented. It
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 7, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Jim: The discussion about letterboxing reminds me of the time I
        was in a Blockbuster Video a few years ago.

        A customer walked in with a tape he rented. It was a widescreen
        version of a movie which also had an alternate pan-and-scan version.
        He complained that the widescreen tape "only showed half the
        picture." The girl at the counter said nothing and exchanged the
        widescreen rental tape for the pan-and-scan version. The customer
        left happy, not considering that he traded a movie version which gave
        him the entire picture for one that truly only gave him half the
        picture.

        After the customer left, I asked the girl if they get that a lot, and
        she said once in awhile it happens. People don't stop and consider
        the difference in aspect ratio between a rectangular theatrical movie
        screen and a more square TV screen. She added that film students and
        collectors know the difference very well, but that Joe Sixpack hasn't
        a clue.

        I also recall some of the older Disney animated features were
        designed for some of the more square movie screens of the time. When
        widescreen became more common later, re-releases of many of the
        earlier Disney films physically cut out the top and bottom of the
        image to make a "fake widescreen" release of an old Disney movie.

        The fact was the audience was being cheated out of nearly half the
        image, yet they were led to believe they were getting more. Sounds
        like they're doing a similar thing today with the release of the TV
        version of KUNG FU, etc. There's gotta be a better way. :-)
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.