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real analysis I (how scary is it?)

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  • maintainer_wiz
    Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect and how to survive real analysis I? I ve done very well in my undegrad advanced calc
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 9, 2002
      Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect and
      how to survive real analysis I? I've done very well in my undegrad
      advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily take this as an
      indication that I should be able to follow the course? Just
      wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first graduate level course.

      Thanks,
      MW
    • Insall
      What text are you using? Matt Insall ... From: maintainer_wiz [mailto:maintainer_wiz@yahoo.com] Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 3:54 PM To:
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 9, 2002
        What text are you using?

        Matt Insall
        -----Original Message-----
        From: maintainer_wiz [mailto:maintainer_wiz@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 3:54 PM
        To: probability@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [probability] real analysis I (how scary is it?)


        Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect and
        how to survive real analysis I? I've done very well in my undegrad
        advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily take this as an
        indication that I should be able to follow the course? Just
        wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first graduate level course.

        Thanks,
        MW


        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • maintainer_wiz
        Bartle s intro to measure theory and lebesgue integration . ... and ... undegrad ... Service.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 9, 2002
          Bartle's "intro to measure theory and lebesgue integration".


          -- In probability@y..., "Insall" <montez@r...> wrote:
          > What text are you using?
          >
          > Matt Insall
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: maintainer_wiz [mailto:maintainer_wiz@y...]
          > Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 3:54 PM
          > To: probability@y...
          > Subject: [probability] real analysis I (how scary is it?)
          >
          >
          > Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect
          and
          > how to survive real analysis I? I've done very well in my
          undegrad
          > advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily take this as an
          > indication that I should be able to follow the course? Just
          > wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first graduate level course.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > MW
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Insall
          Well, read it now, and read also Royden s Real Analysis and ``Baby Rudin (aka ``Principles of Mathematical Analysis ). Don t stop reading until you have
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 9, 2002
            Well, read it now, and read also Royden's Real Analysis and ``Baby Rudin''
            (aka ``Principles of Mathematical Analysis''). Don't stop reading until you
            have understood the basics. Then, when your course begins, work to master
            what you have already read at least twice. When someone asks a question in
            class, write it down,and later, work out the answer on your own, if you did
            not know the answer when it was asked. Don't expect the professor to
            explain everything. That way, if he or she does explain everything, you
            will be pleasantly surprised. Don't expect the professor to exaplain
            anything. That way, ... Well, you know the rest. The more you do for
            yourself, and the less you rely on the professor to do or explain problems
            and their solutions to you, the better off you will be, because in class,
            ``the person learning is the person doing the work'' (Harry Wong, among
            others). As you study the subject, try to find connections to other
            subjects, such as applications to PDEs, applications in R.A. of set theory,
            algebra and linear and multilinear algebra. As you read, make a notebook in
            which you practice making up problems of your own, before the book or the
            professor asks you to do them. If someone else needs help understanding a
            topic, help them. (But if they need help on a solo assignment, of course,
            refuse.) If the professor asks a question of the class, it may not be
            rhetorical. Try to judge this, but you are better off to answer it, rather
            than leaving the professor to form opinions about you from thin air. If you
            did so wonderfully as you say you did in advanced calculus, you should learn
            quickly what answers are right and which ones are wrong, and so you should
            be able to soon begin really demonstrating that you are ``on top of
            things''. Do not wait until the night before a test to study for it. Keep
            good notes, and type them up, if possible. Try indexing them. (Software
            should be available to handle this problem.) Make this a routine habit.
            With the availability of modern writing, typing and type-setting software,
            this should be almost a piece of cake. When your professor assigns some
            problems to do, take a sheet of paper for each problem, and write the
            problems at the top of the sheets. Carry those in a notebook, and for each
            problem, write very plainly all your solution, perfectly, starting on the
            appropriate page on which you already have stated the problem and continue,
            if necessary, on a fresh second sheet of paper. Number each page carefully.
            Review your solution as many times as necessary to make sure you have
            eliminated any errors or unclear sentences or computations. Design the
            notation so that it is self-consistent, complete and efficient, as a
            communication vehicle for your ideas about the correct solution of the
            problem.


            Matt
            -----Original Message-----
            From: maintainer_wiz [mailto:maintainer_wiz@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 5:09 PM
            To: probability@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [probability] Re: real analysis I (how scary is it?)


            Bartle's "intro to measure theory and lebesgue integration".


            -- In probability@y..., "Insall" <montez@r...> wrote:
            > What text are you using?
            >
            > Matt Insall
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: maintainer_wiz [mailto:maintainer_wiz@y...]
            > Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 3:54 PM
            > To: probability@y...
            > Subject: [probability] real analysis I (how scary is it?)
            >
            >
            > Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect
            and
            > how to survive real analysis I? I've done very well in my
            undegrad
            > advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily take this as an
            > indication that I should be able to follow the course? Just
            > wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first graduate level course.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > MW
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            Service.
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


            Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
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            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • The Webmaster
            Thanks for the very detailed response. Will keep all of this in mind. Regards, MW ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Sign
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 10, 2002
              Thanks for the very detailed response. Will keep all
              of this in mind.

              Regards,
              MW

              --- Insall <montez@...> wrote:
              > Well, read it now, and read also Royden's Real
              > Analysis and ``Baby Rudin''
              > (aka ``Principles of Mathematical Analysis'').
              > Don't stop reading until you
              > have understood the basics. Then, when your course
              > begins, work to master
              > what you have already read at least twice. When
              > someone asks a question in
              > class, write it down,and later, work out the answer
              > on your own, if you did
              > not know the answer when it was asked. Don't expect
              > the professor to
              > explain everything. That way, if he or she does
              > explain everything, you
              > will be pleasantly surprised. Don't expect the
              > professor to exaplain
              > anything. That way, ... Well, you know the rest.
              > The more you do for
              > yourself, and the less you rely on the professor to
              > do or explain problems
              > and their solutions to you, the better off you will
              > be, because in class,
              > ``the person learning is the person doing the work''
              > (Harry Wong, among
              > others). As you study the subject, try to find
              > connections to other
              > subjects, such as applications to PDEs, applications
              > in R.A. of set theory,
              > algebra and linear and multilinear algebra. As you
              > read, make a notebook in
              > which you practice making up problems of your own,
              > before the book or the
              > professor asks you to do them. If someone else
              > needs help understanding a
              > topic, help them. (But if they need help on a solo
              > assignment, of course,
              > refuse.) If the professor asks a question of the
              > class, it may not be
              > rhetorical. Try to judge this, but you are better
              > off to answer it, rather
              > than leaving the professor to form opinions about
              > you from thin air. If you
              > did so wonderfully as you say you did in advanced
              > calculus, you should learn
              > quickly what answers are right and which ones are
              > wrong, and so you should
              > be able to soon begin really demonstrating that you
              > are ``on top of
              > things''. Do not wait until the night before a test
              > to study for it. Keep
              > good notes, and type them up, if possible. Try
              > indexing them. (Software
              > should be available to handle this problem.) Make
              > this a routine habit.
              > With the availability of modern writing, typing and
              > type-setting software,
              > this should be almost a piece of cake. When your
              > professor assigns some
              > problems to do, take a sheet of paper for each
              > problem, and write the
              > problems at the top of the sheets. Carry those in a
              > notebook, and for each
              > problem, write very plainly all your solution,
              > perfectly, starting on the
              > appropriate page on which you already have stated
              > the problem and continue,
              > if necessary, on a fresh second sheet of paper.
              > Number each page carefully.
              > Review your solution as many times as necessary to
              > make sure you have
              > eliminated any errors or unclear sentences or
              > computations. Design the
              > notation so that it is self-consistent, complete and
              > efficient, as a
              > communication vehicle for your ideas about the
              > correct solution of the
              > problem.
              >
              >
              > Matt
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: maintainer_wiz
              > [mailto:maintainer_wiz@...]
              > Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 5:09 PM
              > To: probability@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [probability] Re: real analysis I (how
              > scary is it?)
              >
              >
              > Bartle's "intro to measure theory and lebesgue
              > integration".
              >
              >
              > -- In probability@y..., "Insall" <montez@r...>
              > wrote:
              > > What text are you using?
              > >
              > > Matt Insall
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: maintainer_wiz
              > [mailto:maintainer_wiz@y...]
              > > Sent: Tuesday, July 09, 2002 3:54 PM
              > > To: probability@y...
              > > Subject: [probability] real analysis I (how
              > scary is it?)
              > >
              > >
              > > Can anyone provide me with pointers or
              > opinions on what to expect
              > and
              > > how to survive real analysis I? I've done
              > very well in my
              > undegrad
              > > advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily
              > take this as an
              > > indication that I should be able to follow the
              > course? Just
              > > wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first
              > graduate level course.
              > >
              > > Thanks,
              > > MW
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
              > Yahoo! Terms of
              > Service.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > ADVERTISEMENT
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
              > Terms of Service.
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >


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            • jason1990
              It depends on your mathematical strength , of course, but the only significant difference I found between my first year graduate courses and my senior
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 10, 2002
                It depends on your "mathematical strength", of course, but the only
                significant difference I found between my first year graduate courses
                and my senior undergraduate courses was the pacing. In other words, I
                didn't need to change my approach or do anything differently when I
                made the transisition to grad courses. I just needed to do more of
                it. My only advice is to be prepared to work harder than you have in
                your previous courses and, by all means, don't fall behind.

                --- In probability@y..., "maintainer_wiz" <maintainer_wiz@y...> wrote:
                > Can anyone provide me with pointers or opinions on what to expect
                and
                > how to survive real analysis I? I've done very well in my undegrad
                > advanced calc classes, so should I necessarily take this as an
                > indication that I should be able to follow the course? Just
                > wondering here. R.A.I. will be my first graduate level course.
                >
                > Thanks,
                > MW
              • stranger_za
                i would like to ask about mean and median rank.....from my understading these two are estimators in reliability....now i am doing exponential plot and would
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 11, 2002
                  i would like to ask about mean and median rank.....from my
                  understading these two are estimators in reliability....now i am
                  doing exponential plot and would like to know is if the estimation
                  is based on the data given?

                  another question will be is it possible for someone to explain to me
                  how do i estimate MTTF based on the graph
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