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Re: [proa_file] Re: Rudder placement - shunt versus tack?

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  • Doug Haines
    OK how about this for a clear distinction: are you a traditional style ?multihuller? or a modern design guy? bet it s a bit of both. I have come to the
    Message 1 of 70 , Apr 1, 2010
      OK how about this for a clear distinction:

      are you a traditional style ?multihuller? or a modern design guy?

      bet it's a bit of both.

      I have come to the harryproa via a heron dinghy, a hartley 16, a hartley trimaran and then a harryproa.
      I would never have even heard about a proa as being something with a modern design to build. Basically it is not popular as yet. When will there be an international class I wonder?

      Doug

      --- On Thu, 1/4/10, Southern Outriggers <southernoutriggers@...> wrote:

      From: Southern Outriggers <southernoutriggers@...>
      Subject: Re: [proa_file] Re: Rudder placement - shunt versus tack?
      To: proa_file@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, 1 April, 2010, 11:03







       









      >i thought you were a tacking outrigger fan

      >So if you are actually a REAL proa guy, then which types in particular (eg

      in hull rudder etc) are favoured?



      >Doug



      As far as being A REAL proa guy goes......well, a monoproa is not my thing,

      but I have developed an in hull trunk contained rudder wich works OK. I do

      prefer the basic provision, low cost and all round handling capability of a

      wooden steerer blade for beachable outriggers, so that takes care of

      outrigger steering.

      Double hull shunters are another thing (although still proas by consensual

      opinion, if not historically correct), and I fully agree that the most

      convenient steering system is a couple of blades set between the

      hulls.....with only one in use for each tack.

      -Jerry

























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tsstproa
      Proves simplicity boy ;). You don t see me fidgeting with controls raising lowering boards, fighting with long tillers extension, etc.. Well sorted boat takes
      Message 70 of 70 , Apr 14, 2010
        Proves simplicity boy ;). You don't see me fidgeting with controls raising lowering boards, fighting with long tillers extension, etc..

        Well sorted boat takes everything into consideration. Balance!

        Why have two longer boards where one is up in the air all the time?

        I can place a well sorted balanced resistance with two boards vs one. Allowing for better drive and control from sail in all wind condition. With absolute precision handling no matter the wind or water condition.

        Todd


        --- In proa_file@yahoogroups.com, Doug Haines <doha720@...> wrote:
        >
        > i am not sure what this rudder shunting proves..
        > what if you use one board per shunt?
        > then you may lose efficiency of shape if you have them both shaped symetrically like todd's.
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        > --- On Tue, 13/4/10, tsstproa <bitme1234@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: tsstproa <bitme1234@...>
        > Subject: [proa_file] Re: Rudder placement
        > To: proa_file@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tuesday, 13 April, 2010, 5:04
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        > BOOM!!! WHAT? I shunt that fast with my traditionally rigged Korkor.
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        > http://www.youtube com/user/ tsstproa# p/u/47/Hep6jzWf_ Zc
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        > Todd
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        > > --- In proa_file@yahoogrou ps.com, "DrCraze" <drcrazedesign@ > wrote:
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        > > > BOOM!!! http://www.youtube com/watch? v=H_gXcrx7v14& feature=related 1min in he makes his shunt nothing tricky about it at all. he simple swings the tiller to leeward for a full 180 degree rotation.
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