Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Maxwell

Expand Messages
  • WarrenS
    DJB s recommended amazing paper J Clerk Maxwell: A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field. Maxwell, J Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society
    Message 1 of 2 , May 13 1:24 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      DJB's recommended "amazing" paper

      J Clerk Maxwell:
      A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field. Maxwell, J Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1776-1886).

      is available free online here:

      http://archive.org/details/philtrans00041514

      in several formats; "read online" seems for me the best.
      Maxwell's seems pretty pitiful to me compared with modern treatments.
      Definitely would not recommend that anyone try to learn from this.
      It is interesting in showing the magnitude of the struggle he had to endure
      and the fact that in various ways he still remained trapped in some false/misleading
      notions.
    • Paul Leyland
      ... Warning: possible heresy ahead. Aether as the medium of transmission of electromagnetic waves has rather gone out of fashion, and for good reasons, not
      Message 2 of 2 , May 20 2:14 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        On Tue, 2013-05-14 at 20:09 +0000, John wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com, "WarrenS" <warren.wds@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > DJB's recommended "amazing" paper
        > >
        > > J Clerk Maxwell:
        > > A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field. Maxwell, J
        > Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
        > (1776-1886).
        > >
        > > is available free online here:
        > >
        > > http://archive.org/details/philtrans00041514
        > >
        > > in several formats; "read online" seems for me the best.
        > > Maxwell's seems pretty pitiful to me compared with modern
        > treatments.
        > > Definitely would not recommend that anyone try to learn from this.
        > > It is interesting in showing the magnitude of the struggle he had to
        > endure
        > > and the fact that in various ways he still remained trapped in some
        > false/misleading
        > > notions.
        ...
        > Now, concerning Maxwell's ideas and their "false/misleading" I presume
        > were to do with the "ether" in great part. Whatever is in the material
        > world is capable of rudimentary description, and that description
        > becomes in its most sophisticated form the thing called science. Some
        > science uses mathematics in order to attempt to understand and
        > manipulate matter, in which case it makes possible technology, which
        > contains within it aspects of craft and art.
        >
        > I understand that, in scientific circles, the idea of "ether" has not
        > been completely dismissed, but this is possily because the idea of
        > empty space is abhorrent, as in "Nature abhors a vacuum".

        Warning: possible heresy ahead.

        "Aether" as the medium of transmission of electromagnetic waves has
        rather gone out of fashion, and for good reasons, not least the famous
        Michelson-Morley experiment. However, the work of Einstein, Poincare et
        al has shown that space-time has many of the properties of the old
        aether.

        Consider: space-time is the transmission medium for gravitational
        radiation; aether for electromagnetic radiation. It is invisible to
        anything except gravitational physics (c.f. aether's invisibility to
        anything but electromagnetic physics). It is the most rigid material
        known (the entire mass-energy of the earth is sufficient only to bend
        space-time to a radius of curvature of around one light year) and is
        arguably the most rigid possible (c.f. aether's perfect elasticity).

        Paul
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.