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Re: primes such that every bit matters?

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  • WarrenS
    ... --didn t claim they were wrong. And in fact, W.Keller pointed out to me this paper #A61 here: http://www.integers-ejcnt.org/vol8.html which would seem to
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 4, 2013
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      > It is surely unlikely that such an illustrious project has got it all wrong!

      --didn't claim they were wrong. And in fact, W.Keller pointed out to me this paper
      #A61 here: http://www.integers-ejcnt.org/vol8.html
      which would seem to confirm what I said (they already knew it).
      It's just a bit weird that I thought I had a totally original problem, and it turns out it
      has been worked on a ton by others for years...

      Also, this frightening number is a probable prime:
      19249+2^551542


      > The mistake is that all your remarks are about the so-called /dual/ Sierpinski problem.
      --which is... what?
    • djbroadhurst
      ... Section 2 of the paper to which Wilfrid directed you explains the diffrence between the SierpiĀ“nski problem and its dual, as remarked upon by Mike. David
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 4, 2013
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        --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com,
        "WarrenS" <warren.wds@...> wrote:

        > > The mistake is that all your remarks are about the so-called /dual/ Sierpinski problem.
        > --which is... what?

        Section 2 of the paper to which Wilfrid directed you
        explains the diffrence between the SierpiĀ“nski problem
        and its dual, as remarked upon by Mike.

        David (atonally)
      • djbroadhurst
        ... Why might that seem weird to you, Warren? None of us should presuppose a monopoly on originality. Please see
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 4, 2013
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          --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com,
          "WarrenS" <warren.wds@...> wrote:

          > It's just a bit weird that I thought I had a totally original
          > problem, and it turns out it has been worked on a ton by others
          > for years...

          Why might that seem "weird" to you, Warren?
          None of us should presuppose a monopoly on originality.

          Please see
          http://primes.utm.edu/primes/page.php?id=110402
          > Kaiser1, Broadhurst, OpenPFGW, NewPGen, Primo
          for a laborious ECPP proof of a prime relevant to
          the dual Sierpi'nski problem:
          http://oeis.org/A076336/a076336c.html
          > 21661 61792 Broadhurst [May 20, 2002]

          In this case, neither Peter Kaiser nor I claim originality,
          which is indeed a scarce commodity.

          David
        • Maximilian Hasler
          ... FWIW, the pages are still available at http://web.archive.org/http://www.csm.astate.edu/~wpaulsen/primemaze/pmaze.html Maximilian
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 4, 2013
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            > And although Paulsen's links seem to be dead, here's a message from
            > 10+ years ago, to this very mailing list, offering up the number 2131099:

            FWIW, the pages are still available at
            http://web.archive.org/http://www.csm.astate.edu/~wpaulsen/primemaze/pmaze.html

            Maximilian
          • djbroadhurst
            ... and is dwarfed by http://www.primenumbers.net/prptop/detailprp.php?rank=1 ... David
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 4, 2013
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              --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com,
              "WarrenS" <warren.wds@...> wrote:

              > this frightening number is a probable prime:
              > 19249+2^551542

              and is dwarfed by
              http://www.primenumbers.net/prptop/detailprp.php?rank=1
              > 2^9092392+40291

              David
            • Maximilian Hasler
              ... If you paste this into OEIS (and probably google, too) you will immediately find A137985 which in the first comment links to A065092, which in turn
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 5, 2013
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                >
                > A prime P which turns into a composite if you alter any bit in
                > its binary representation is an "every bit matters" prime.
                >
                > The examples below 10000 are
                > 127, 173, 191, 223, 233, 239, 251, 257, 277, 337, 349, 373, 431, 443,
                > ...

                If you paste this into OEIS (and probably google, too)
                you will immediately find A137985 which in the first comment links
                to A065092, which in turn refers to Paulsen's Prime Numbers Maze.

                Regards,
                Maximilian
              • Phil Carmody
                ... There is something weird though - and that s that huge quantities of stuff I looked at a decade ago is being rediscovered by Warren. This makes my
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 9, 2013
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                  --- On Thu, 4/4/13, djbroadhurst wrote:
                  > "WarrenS" <warren.wds@...> wrote:
                  > > It's just a bit weird that I thought I had a totally original
                  > > problem, and it turns out it has been worked on a ton by others
                  > > for years...
                  >
                  > Why might that seem "weird" to you, Warren?
                  > None of us should presuppose a monopoly on originality.

                  There is something weird though - and that's that huge quantities of
                  stuff I looked at a decade ago is being rediscovered by Warren. This
                  makes my retirement from the field very hard, as he keeps posting
                  things that I've been directly interested in. However, I'm happy, as
                  a fresh mind approaching a problem can only ever increase the amount
                  that is known, never diminish it. In particular, whilst my arithmetic
                  may have been efficient, I was rarely good at the hard maths, so
                  hopefully Warren can get past the road-blocks that I had way back when.

                  Phil
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