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Re: {Spam?} Re: [PrimeNumbers] nuclear & atomic physics & primes. (Warning: Kind of silly.)

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  • Paul Leyland
    ... You may believe what you like. However, as I understand QED and QCD (admittedly imperfectly) there is a non-zero chance of all three quarks approaching
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 5, 2012
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      On Fri, 2012-10-05 at 04:27 -0400, Mike Oakes wrote:
      > Paul
      >
      > A possible mechanism is for the three quarks in a nucleon to
      > approach
      > each other closely enough to form a micro black hole which
      > then
      > evaporates.
      > I don't believe your "possible mechanism".
      > The Schwazschild radius of a black hole is proportional to its mass.
      > The mass of the 3 quarks is of order 10^-20 Planck-mass, so they would
      > have to approach to within 10^-52 cms.
      > No-one (yet) can do physics even at the Planck scale, let alone at
      > small fractions of it.
      > So your remark is sim. to counting angels dancing on the head of a
      > pin :-)

      You may believe what you like. However, as I understand QED and QCD
      (admittedly imperfectly) there is a non-zero chance of all three quarks
      approaching each other arbitrarily closely. The chance is exceedingly
      small, I admit, so the nucleon half-life to decay by this mechanism is
      exceedingly long. I don't expect to see a proton decay like this but,
      then, neither do I routinely wear a pressure suit in case I should
      quantum teleport clean out of the solar system even though that is
      possible in principle.

      Getting *seriously* off topic 8-(

      Paul
    • Warren Smith
      for whatever it is worth I agree with Leyland re the quantum gravity decay mechanism for protons and most any other kind of matter too. But I also agree with
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 5, 2012
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        for whatever it is worth I agree with Leyland re the quantum gravity
        decay mechanism
        for protons and most any other kind of matter too.

        But I also agree with Oakes it is highly angelic.
      • Paul Leyland
        ... Actually, I made no appeal to quantum gravity. The mechanism is pure classical quantum mechanics in a curved spacetime, a la Schrödinger, Heisenberg,
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 5, 2012
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          On Fri, 2012-10-05 at 10:37 -0400, Warren Smith wrote:
          >
          > for whatever it is worth I agree with Leyland re the quantum gravity
          > decay mechanism
          > for protons and most any other kind of matter too.

          Actually, I made no appeal to quantum gravity. The mechanism is pure
          "classical" quantum mechanics in a curved spacetime, a la Schrödinger,
          Heisenberg, Dirac and Hawking.
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