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Re: [PrimeNumbers] Goldbach news

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  • Jens Kruse Andersen
    ... Mathematician and head of computer application department of Assam Engineering College Bichitra Kalita, has claimed to have solved the famous Goldbach
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 2, 2012
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      Steven Harvey wrote:
      > http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/guwahati/Mathematician-solves-270-year-old-conjecture/articleshow/16635760.cms

      " Mathematician and head of computer application department of Assam
      Engineering College Bichitra Kalita, has claimed to have solved the famous
      'Goldbach conjecture', one of the unsolved problems in mathematics, using a
      new technique called the graph theory."

      Kalita may have found an application of graph theory but the formulation
      sounds like the newspaper hasn't had their article reviewed by a
      mathematician. Graph theory predates Goldbachs 1742 conjecture.
      Euler's paper on the Seven Bridges of Königsberg is from 1736 and considered
      the first work on graph theory.

      "Kalita's research work "Graph and Goldbach Conjecture" has been accepted by
      the department of mathematics of University of Chemical Technology and
      Metallurgy in Sofia, Bulgaria in July this year."

      The only Google hit on "Graph and Goldbach Conjecture" is the newspaper
      article. I don't know Bulgarian.

      "The work will be published in the International Journal of Pure and Applied
      Mathematics, Kalita informed."

      Submitted or accepted? Does the newspaper even know the difference? They could
      have misquoted Kalita.
      According to
      http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Certain+forms+of+even+numbers+and+their+properties.-a0215842185
      Kalita already claimed to prove Goldbach's conjecture in 2006. The index at
      http://www.bpas.in/journals/maths/2006/vol2.pdf does say:
      "Bichitra Kalita
      PROOF OF GOLDBACH CONJECTURE AND RELATED CONJECTURES OF PRIME. 451-459"

      I haven't seen the paper. Google doesn't find any other mention of it, except
      the title in a long list of Indian science papers.

      --
      Jens Kruse Andersen
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