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Re: T-Sequence faster than APRT-CLE

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  • leavemsg1
    Mr. Broadhurst, I don t want to be a thorn in your side, but I ve fixed the T-Sequence or as you call it, 2-Selfridge test. I ve produced both the Adobe
    Message 1 of 31 , Oct 9, 2010
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      Mr. Broadhurst,

      I don't want to be a thorn in your side, but I've fixed
      the "T-Sequence" or as you call it, "2-Selfridge" test.
      I've produced both the Adobe Flex 4 application re-work
      and 80 lines of generic code that will accurately detect
      ALL composites. I corrected the co-authors' interpreta-
      tion of their T-Sequence apparatus; it was as simple as
      the wart on your nose. (you called yourself some kind of
      a troll watcher, remember ???) The test has to pass two
      full periods with a different seed each time to be proved
      as prime, correctly; it's also in pure polynomial time!

      > > Caveat lector: Bill's "T-sequence" declares
      > > 74442383 = 8627*8629

      it reads as composite... after my corrections.

      > > to be prime.
      >
      > Here are 3 more composites that Bill has "proven" to be prime
      > 94954861 94502701 94222127

      these don't prove as prime either, now.
      I corrected the interpretation of the 2-Selfridge test.

      >

      > Anyone who knows how to google can now find lots more.
      >
      > David
      >

      semper paratus; quam operor vos amo illud pomum?
      I took Latin in high school also...............
      Bill
      take a look... www.oddperfectnumbers.com, if you like...
    • Chris Caldwell
      ... as late as 2000 our department of ... of colliding neutron stars! As an undergraduate I learned Fortran, Compass, and had a course in Algol, because it is
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 27, 2010
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        > When I was a graduate student of physics at the University of Texas:
        as late as 2000 our department of
        > computational relativity STILL used Fortran to do all its calculations
        of colliding neutron stars!

        As an undergraduate I learned Fortran, Compass, and had a course in
        Algol, because "it is the language of the future!" My first course in
        High School was IBM 360 Assembly Language (because the school district
        had one--that was the year before we got the PDP 1 and switched to basic
        on paper tape). Those I knew still using Fortran a few years ago were
        doing so because of the parallelized libraries useful on the massively
        paralyzed super computers. Sometimes you write in the language used
        locally, rather than what you want (e.g., 360 Assembly, Compass, ...).
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