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Re: [PrimeNumbers] True confessions

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  • joe.mclean@it.glasgow.gov.uk
    Paul, regarding your proof of Bertrand s postulate, which is based on the two congruences x = n mod A and x = -B mod n where A+B = n and n+A is a prime. How do
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 3, 2001
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      Paul,

      regarding your proof of Bertrand's postulate, which is based on the
      two congruences x = n mod A and x = -B mod n where A+B = n and n+A is
      a prime. How do you choose A, B and n ? You cannot choose arbitrary
      values, since it is easy to find composites, e.g. n = 11, A = 4, so
      these must come from an existing example. But the occurrence of one
      prime between a known n and 2n can hardly be used to prove the general
      case. All you are doing is going round in a circle. You also make
      several illogical leaps, including deducing that your primary
      equations are true, when they are already statements of fact. Your
      whole approach is fundamentally flawed.

      The criticism you have received from the likes of David Broadhurst and
      Phil Carmody and me is not meant as insult, but is a necessary part of
      maths - all work must be independently and objectively verified in
      order to be considered valid.

      Joe.


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