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Re: R: The heart beats of numbers (the secret of prime numbers)

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  • Mark Underwood
    ... What Philip appears to be saying is that there is at least one prime between x^2 and x^2 - x and between x^2 and x^2 + x for all x 1. The question of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 25, 2009
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      --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com, Yann Guidon <whygee@...> wrote:
      >
      > philip367g wrote:
      > > What I intend to say is that within each string the minor
      > > factor of numbers, always determines the presence of at
      > > least two prime number.
      >
      > Excuse me again, but I am even more confused.
      > I tried to read the english PDF but I don't understand
      > where it comes from and where it goes.
      > I'm better at algorithmics than pure maths.
      >
      > so can you define what your "strings" are (how
      > they are built and what their properties are),
      > what are the "minor factors of numbers",
      > and what clearly is the consequences.
      >
      > > .1...2;
      > > (1),(1);
      > >
      > > .3...4;.5,..6;
      > > (1).(2).1).(2);
      > >
      > > .7...8...9;...10..11..12;
      > > (1).(2).(3);..(2).(1).(3);
      > >
      > > 13..14..15..16;...17...18...19..20;
      > > (1).(2).(3).(4);..(1).(2-3).(1).(4);
      > >
      > > .21..22..23..24..25;....26..27..28..29..30;
      > > (3)..(2).(1).(4).(5);...(2).(3).(4).(1).(5);
      >
      > without further explanation, I totally fail to see anything
      > meaningful there. What is your goal and the means ?
      >

      What Philip appears to be saying is that there is at least one prime between x^2 and x^2 - x and between x^2 and x^2 + x for all x > 1.

      The question of course is whether he can prove it. :)

      When we look at each number n between x^2 and x^2 - x and between x^2 and x^2 + x, each n is assigned a number m, m being the largest factor of n less than or equal to the square root of n.

      Just how these m's relate to a potential proof, I don't know.

      Mark
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