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Fw: Re: [PrimeNumbers] Loosey-Goosey Goldbach vs. Riemann - Revised

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  • Mark Underwood
    ... Now I m making it more complex than necessary, and I m not even a lawyer. :) Bill s proposal simply amounted to this: For every even integer there is a
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 18, 2008
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      --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Underwood"
      <mark.underwood@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Bill,
      >
      > Well, is this not further evidence that lawyers have a penchant for
      > making simple things overly complex? :) Nonetheless you are still in
      > good company because Pierre de Fermat was also a lawyer if I remember
      > correctly.
      >
      > Anyways, the Loosey-Goosey Goldbach proposal first stalls at
      >
      > I = 60
      > and
      > I = 61.
      >
      > That is because there is a relatively huge prime gap between the prime
      > 113 and the next prime 127.
      >
      > For instance, if I = 60, there is no N that is 1,3,or 5 away from 60
      > which when added to 60 will yield a prime.
      >
      >
      > Mark
      >
      >
      > .
      >

      Now I'm making it more complex than necessary, and I'm not even a
      lawyer. :)

      Bill's proposal simply amounted to this: For every even integer there
      is a prime that is 1,3 or 5 units away. This is a no go, but it
      reminds me of an earlier proposal of mine: For every positive integer
      n there is a prime or prime power just a square (no larger than n) away.

      ie,

      2 + 1^2 = 3

      33 - 5^2 = 2^3.

      Proof to follow.
      (not!)

      Mark
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