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Re: [PrimeNumbers] Known prime gaps

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  • SWagler@aol.com
    All, Years ago I plotted a frequency distribution of prime gaps from 2 to some small limit and the curve always looked similar to the curve for black body
    Message 1 of 11 , May 7, 2007
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      All,

      Years ago I plotted a frequency distribution of prime gaps from 2 to some small limit and the curve always looked similar to the curve for black body radiation. Has anyone done this for limits large or small? Are there theoretical reasons to account for this?

      Steve Wagler



      -----Original Message-----
      From: jens.k.a@...
      To: primenumbers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, 6 May 2007 5:14 PM
      Subject: [PrimeNumbers] Known prime gaps


      Polignac's conjecture says all even prime gap sizes occur infinitely many
      times. So far the only known way to prove existence of a gap size is to find
      an occurrence.

      Thomas R. Nicely maintains tables of first known occurrence prime gaps at
      http://www.trnicely.net/gaps/gaplist.html
      For each gap size the smallest known consecutive primes or prp's with that
      gap are listed.

      Torbjörn Alm has searched first known occurrence gaps for a long time with a
      sieve by me, using modular equations to ensure unusually many small factors
      in wanted gaps. Small prp tests are made by the GMP library, and large by
      PrimeForm/GW.

      There is now a proven occurrence of all 10000 even gaps up to 20000.
      Marcel Martin's Primo proved the large majority of the 20000 gap ends.

      In addition, there is now either a proven or prp occurrence of all even gaps
      up to 30000, and currently of 30046 even gaps in total (and 1 odd!).
      Torbjörn found the listed occurrence of 21274 of them. Others had previously
      found larger primes for some of the gap sizes. It is not recorded who was
      the first to find an occurrence of a gap.

      The Top-20 Prime Gaps at
      http://hjem.get2net.dk/jka/math/primegaps/gaps20.htm lists the best gaps in
      different categories.
      The merit of the gap from p1 to p2 is defined as (p2-p1)/log p1, where log
      p1 is the average gap size in that vicinity.
      This year Torbjörn has found the 3 largest known gaps with merit above 20.
      The best is a gap of 114554 between 2227-digit primes. The merit is 22.34.

      --
      Jens Kruse Andersen
      ___
      .

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Phil Carmody
      ... Prime gaps are far from smoothly distributed. Gaps divisible by 3 are more likely than ones not divisible by 3. As 30 becomes small, gaps divisible by 30
      Message 2 of 11 , May 8, 2007
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        --- SWagler@... wrote:
        > All,
        >
        > Years ago I plotted a frequency distribution of prime gaps from 2 to some
        > small limit and the curve always looked similar to the curve for black body
        > radiation. Has anyone done this for limits large or small? Are there
        > theoretical reasons to account for this?

        Prime gaps are far from smoothly distributed.
        Gaps divisible by 3 are more likely than ones not divisible by 3.
        As 30 becomes small, gaps divisible by 30 also become more popular.
        As always this can be explained by looking at small primes.

        Phil

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      • Andrey Kulsha
        ... A good illustration: http://ieeta.pt/~tos/gaps.html All the best, Andrey [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 11 , May 8, 2007
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          > > Years ago I plotted a frequency distribution of prime gaps from 2 to some
          > > small limit and the curve always looked similar to the curve for black body
          > > radiation. Has anyone done this for limits large or small? Are there
          > > theoretical reasons to account for this?
          >
          > Prime gaps are far from smoothly distributed.
          > Gaps divisible by 3 are more likely than ones not divisible by 3.
          > As 30 becomes small, gaps divisible by 30 also become more popular.
          > As always this can be explained by looking at small primes.

          A good illustration: http://ieeta.pt/~tos/gaps.html

          All the best,

          Andrey

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Phil Carmody
          ... Except it doesn t venture into the 30 becomes small region. I can t remember where 30 takes over on from 30 as the most likely gap. I presume that s
          Message 4 of 11 , May 8, 2007
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            --- Andrey Kulsha <Andrey_601@...> wrote:
            > > > Years ago I plotted a frequency distribution of prime gaps from 2 to some
            > > > small limit and the curve always looked similar to the curve for black
            > body
            > > > radiation. Has anyone done this for limits large or small? Are there
            > > > theoretical reasons to account for this?
            > >
            > > Prime gaps are far from smoothly distributed.
            > > Gaps divisible by 3 are more likely than ones not divisible by 3.
            > > As 30 becomes small, gaps divisible by 30 also become more popular.
            > > As always this can be explained by looking at small primes.
            >
            > A good illustration: http://ieeta.pt/~tos/gaps.html

            Except it doesn't venture into the '30 becomes small' region. I can't remember
            where 30 takes over on from 30 as the most likely gap. I presume that's touched
            on somewhere on the prime pages or on mathworld, and if it isn't on both,
            something should be done about that!

            Phil

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          • Jens Kruse Andersen
            ... They are the first two hits on http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22jumping+champion%22 -- Jens Kruse Andersen
            Message 5 of 11 , May 8, 2007
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              Phil Carmody wrote:
              >> A good illustration: http://ieeta.pt/~tos/gaps.html
              >
              > Except it doesn't venture into the '30 becomes small' region. I can't
              > remember
              > where 30 takes over on from 30 as the most likely gap. I presume that's
              > touched
              > on somewhere on the prime pages or on mathworld, and if it isn't on both,
              > something should be done about that!

              They are the first two hits on
              http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22jumping+champion%22

              --
              Jens Kruse Andersen
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