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Automatic Prime Number Locator - A Remarkable Discovery Two Days Early

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  • Bob Gilson
    Hi All! Consider the following sequence 0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,7,8,8,9,11 ... What are the next numbers? Okay, okay you clever lot, yes it s easy to determine
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 30, 2007
      Hi All!

      Consider the following sequence 0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,7,8,8,9,11 ...

      What are the next numbers?

      Okay, okay you clever lot, yes it's easy to determine that the continuation is
      13,13,15,16,16,18,19,21,24,25,25,26,26, 27,33,34,36,36,40,40,42 ...

      Obviously you've all been doing too many MENSA tests.

      Actually, and technically, the sequence comprises two alternating lead diagonals from Polya/Alisford infinite matrices, which can be easily reconciled and extended as far as you desire.

      Welcome, then, to the Automatic Prime Number Finder, hereinafter known as APF. So how ( I hear you ask), can you possibly locate the primes directly from this APF sequence?

      Well the mathematical reasons are deep, but the results, extremely practical and easy to apply. :-)

      Let's inspect the first 30 numbers of the sequence

      APF:0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,7,8,8,9,11,13,13,15,16,16,18,19,21,24,25,25,26,26,27,33

      Suppose you want to know what the 20th odd prime number is - well the 20th number in the above sequence is 16, and 20 + 16 = 36, which we'll call "T ". Now apply the function 2T+1, and voila, we have (2*36) + 1 = 73, the 20th odd prime number. Simple as that.

      The following table demonstrates the stunning power and beauty of the arithmetic using this method:

      APF No. T 2T+1
      0 1 1 3 0 2 2 5 0 3 3 7 1 4 5 11 1 5 6 13 2 6 8 17 2 7 9 19 3 8 11 23 5 9 14 29 5 10 15 31 7 11 18 37 8 12 20 41 8 13 21 43 9 14 23 47 11 15 26 53 13 16 29 59 13 17 30 61 15 18 33 67 16 19 35 71 16 20 36 73 18 21 39 79 19 22 41 83 21 23 44 89 24 24 48 97 25 25 50 101 25 26 51 103 26 27 53 107 26 28 54 109 27 29 56 113 33 30 63 127 34 31 65 131 36 32 68 137 36 33 69 139 40
      34 74 149 40 35 75 151 42 36 78 157

      So now you don't need polynomial prime generating functions to find prime sequences, fancy formulae, Riemanns Hypothesis, nor even trial division - all you need is the APF index to find any and every prime number, except 2 of course.

      Suppose you want to know what the 999,999,999th odd prime number is.

      Simply get the APF index to generate the relevant sequence number; this can be done on PARI.PG, although PARI.Lo-Flo is faster, and as the latter name implies, stack overflows, when dealing with thousands of digits, are avoided.

      PARI.Lo-Flo returns a result of 10,400,881,745 - add this to 999,999,999 to get T; perform the 2T+1 function and straightaway you"ll know that the 999,999,999th odd prime is 22,801,763,489.

      It's my guess that this process has been known for years to both Bletchley Park and the NSA, and with it they have broken all the Internet Codes and RSA numbers at will. One thing's for sure I'm not going to use my credit card on the Internet any more.

      Enjoy!



      PS: If anyone can help co-write this remarkable finding, in order to publish a paper in formal mathematical jargon, so that even mathematicians can understand and grasp the concept, please let me know




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Phil Carmody
      ... Ahttp://www.research.att.com/~njas/sequences/A008507 008507 Number of odd composite numbers less than n-th odd prime. 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 8,
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 30, 2007
        --- Bob Gilson <bobgillson@...> wrote:
        > Hi All!
        >
        > Consider the following sequence 0,0,0,1,1,2,2,3,5,5,7,8,8,9,11 ...
        >
        > What are the next numbers?

        Ahttp://www.research.att.com/~njas/sequences/A008507

        008507 Number of odd composite numbers less than n-th odd prime.
        0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 11,

        > Welcome, then, to the Automatic Prime Number Finder, hereinafter known as
        > APF. So how ( I hear you ask), can you possibly locate the primes directly
        > from this APF sequence?

        So you want to find primes using a sequence defined in terms of where the
        primes are?

        Phil

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      • Nathan Russell
        ... Bletchley Park and the NSA, and with it they have broken all the Internet Codes and RSA numbers at will. One thing s for sure I m not going to use my
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 30, 2007
          --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com, Bob Gilson <bobgillson@...> wrote:

          > It's my guess that this process has been known for years to both
          Bletchley Park and the NSA, and with it they have broken all the
          Internet Codes and RSA numbers at will. One thing's for sure I'm not
          going to use my credit card on the Internet any more.

          Putting aside the rest of your argument, a method to find all the
          primes quickly would not cause breaking RSA (or any other encryption
          system I'm aware of). Determining whether a specified number is a
          probable prime is an easy problem (seconds for numbers of the size
          used in RSA implementations), and a large probable prime is almost
          certain by all conventional standards of probability to be prime. If
          the NSA or anyone else found an efficient way to find the *prime
          factors* of large numbers, then they'd be in business (at least in
          terms of breaking RSA, which is being used somewhat less often for
          other reasons). Posting to the list because this is a moderately
          common misunderstanding.

          Nathan
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