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RE a prime generating polynomial

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  • Jose Ramón Brox
    ... From: markherkommer Has anybody tried n^2 - 79n + 1601 This polynomial will produce 80 primes. Mark Herkommer ... Yes, but the 80
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 2, 2006
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "markherkommer" <newmetro@...>


      Has anybody tried

      n^2 - 79n + 1601

      This polynomial will produce 80 primes.

      Mark Herkommer

      ------------------------------------

      Yes, but the 80 primes are symmetric respect to n = 40, so they are only 40 primes, half
      of them are repetitions.

      I note that (as I think you'll know) you are merely displacing the famous prime-generating
      polynomial of Euler, n^2-n+41 in such a way that the 80 primes of these polynomial,
      located between -39 and 40 are now located between 0 and 79:

      (n-39)^2 -(n-39) + 41 =

      = n^2 -78n + 1521 - n + 80 =

      = n^2 - 79n + 1601


      Jose Brox
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