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RSA case closed!

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  • Kent Nguyen
    Ladies and Gentlemen, I have an important announce to make. Remember back in 2001 or so, I made this preposterous statement that I ll crack the RSA code.
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 8, 2005
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      Ladies and Gentlemen,

      I have an important announce to make. Remember back
      in 2001 or so, I made this preposterous statement that
      I'll crack the RSA code. Hehe, today, I realize RSA
      if p1 does not equal p2, its product will take
      non-polynomial time to solve.

      Here's why:

      There was this guy who claim to prove using Bell
      Inequality that there's 50% that RSA is non-polynomial
      time to solve. What we want now is to prove that the
      other 50% is polynomial time. And that's exactly what
      it is. If p1=p2, the product is p^2 which means we
      could solve it in polynomial time. Therefore 100% of
      RSA is non-polynomial time to solve if p1 does not
      equal p2.

      Q.E.D.

      Woohoo! After so many years! I convinced myself.
      There you go Nick! I don't have to find that
      magically polynomial equation to solve the condition
      when p1 does not equal to p2, cause there isn't! =)

      Now let's take what I wrote to the bank. We need to
      let that guy who prove that when he uses Bell
      Inequality to prove there's only 50% to solve RSA in
      non-polynomial time. If that's true, he'll also
      realize my statement is true. So if both are true, we
      have ourselves a celebration. Time to PARTY! =)

      Good nite everyone! Haha if this get to slashdot,
      just remember to take my email address out ... I'm
      having a problem with spam lately. =) hehehe hahahaha



      ====================================================
      From: "Paul Leyland" <pleyland@...>
      Date: Wed Aug 1, 2001 1:10 am
      Subject: RE: [PrimeNumbers] Re: Cracking RSA:
      Relationship between prime numbers and quantum theory
      pleyland@...
      Send Email Send Email

      > One of the postulate in quantum theory states that
      no two
      > particle can occupy the same place at the same time.

      Not true in general. It is true for fermions
      (particles with spin
      (2i+1)/2) and is known as the Pauli exclusion
      principle. For bosons
      (particles with integral spin) particles can, and do,
      occupy precisely
      the same state at the same time. It's why lasers,
      superfluids and
      superconductors have such interesting properties.

      I fail to see what any of this has to do with
      factorization, but it will
      be interesting to see if anything comes from it.


      Paul
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