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we are now 1087...

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  • Sudarshan Iyengar
    Please do not consider this post irrelevant... We are now 1087 in number (total members in our group). And that s a prime number... What is so interesting
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 12 5:59 AM
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      Please do not consider this post irrelevant...

      We are now 1087 in number (total members in our group).
      And that's a prime number...

      What is so interesting about this prime number?

      -Sudarshan
    • Sarad AV
      hi, ... Its a Kynea prime number with index 5? Sarad. ____________________________________________________ Sell on Yahoo! Auctions – no fees. Bid on great
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 12 7:00 AM
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        hi,

        --- Sudarshan Iyengar <sudarshan@...-edu.com>
        wrote:
        > We are now 1087 in number (total members in our
        > group).And that's a prime number...
        > What is so interesting about this prime number?

        Its a Kynea prime number with index 5?

        Sarad.



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        Sell on Yahoo! Auctions – no fees. Bid on great items.
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      • Douglas Chester
        Can t think of anything off the top of my head, and David Wells s Curious and Interesting Numbers does not have an entry. According to Chris Caldwell s Prime
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 13 2:25 PM
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          Can't think of anything off the top of my head, and David
          Wells's "Curious and Interesting Numbers" does not have an entry.
          According to Chris Caldwell's Prime Curios

          1087 is a prime factor of the 32nd Lucas number (the first such
          number with index of form 2^n that is composite).
          The largest known number such that (10000^n+1)/10001 is probably
          prime.


          Perhaps we should try and find another half a dozen new members, then
          we are 1093. Wells's entry for 1093 is a bit more interesting:

          "2^1092 - 1 is divisible by 1093. Only one other number is known
          below 4 * 10^12 with this property, 3511.
          In 1909 Wieferich created a sensation by proving that if Fermat's
          equation, x^p + y^p = z^p, has a solution in whih p is an odd prime
          that does notr divide any of x, y or z, then 2^(p-1) - 1 is divisible
          by p^2. As facts about Fermat's last theorem go, this is remarkably
          simple. That 1093 and 3511 are the only solutions below 4 * 10^12
          means that only these two cases of Fermat's theorem need to be
          considered, below that limit, of p does not divide xyz."

          Douglas Chester







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