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demonstration of quantum computing for factoring

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  • Mark Underwood
    Found a good news article at http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/fourier.htm part of which is below. The whole article goes into more detail regarding
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 8, 2005
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      Found a good news article at

      http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/fourier.htm

      part of which is below. The whole article goes into more detail
      regarding how the quantum Fourier transform works.

      Mark




      May 12, 2005


      Boulder, Colo.—A crucial step in a procedure that could enable future
      quantum computers to break today's most commonly used encryption
      codes has been demonstrated by physicists at the U.S. Commerce
      Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).



      As reported in the May 13 issue of the journal Science,* the NIST
      team showed that it is possible to identify repeating patterns in
      quantum information stored in ions (charged atoms). The NIST work
      used three ions as quantum bits (qubits) to represent 1s or 0s—or,
      under the unusual rules of quantum physics, both 1 and 0 at the same
      time. Scientists believe that much larger arrays of such ions could
      process data in a powerful quantum computer. Previous demonstrations
      of similar processes were performed with qubits made of molecules in
      a liquid, a system that cannot be expanded to large numbers of qubits.

      "Our demonstration is important, because it helps pave the way toward
      building a large-scale quantum computer," says John Chiaverini, lead
      author of the paper. "Our approach also requires fewer steps and is
      more efficient than those demonstrated previously."

      The NIST team used electromagnetically trapped beryllium ions as
      qubits to demonstrate a quantum version of the "Fourier transform"
      process, a widely used method for finding repeating patterns in data.
      The quantum version is the crucial final step in Shor's algorithm, a
      series of steps for finding the "prime factors" of large numbers—the
      prime numbers that when multiplied together produce a given number.

      Developed by Peter Shor of Bell Labs in 1994, the factoring algorithm
      sparked burgeoning interest in quantum computing. Modern cryptography
      techniques, which rely on the fact that even the fastest
      supercomputers require very long times to factor large numbers, are
      used to encode everything from military communications to bank
      transactions. But a quantum computer using Shor's algorithm could
      factor a number several hundred digits long in a reasonably short
      time. This algorithm made code breaking the most important
      application for quantum computing
    • Sarad AV
      hi, Shoup presents us with a polynomial time factoring algorithm using quantum computers. Its still not known if such a powerful computer can be made but
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 8, 2005
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        hi,

        Shoup presents us with a polynomial time factoring
        algorithm using quantum computers. Its still not known
        if such a powerful computer can be made but NIST's
        announcement points out this may be possible. You may
        be interested in looking at this.
        http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0010034

        Sarad.

        --- Mark Underwood <mark.underwood@...>
        wrote:
        > Found a good news article at
        >
        >
        http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/fourier.htm
        >
        > part of which is below. The whole article goes into
        > more detail
        > regarding how the quantum Fourier transform works.
        >
        > Mark
        >
        >
        >



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      • Sarad AV
        Its Shor and not Shoup. My bad. __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 8, 2005
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          Its Shor and not Shoup.
          My bad.






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