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Re: 17^k+13^k+... is PRP

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  • Andrey Kulsha
    Hello! ... It isn t the reason. If you find enough curious properties of this number, G.L. Honaker perhaps will publish it even if it s only a PRP. Best
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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      Hello!

      Milton Brown wrote:

      > Because it would take at least 2 months to
      > certify, presumably.

      It isn't the reason. If you find enough curious properties of this number, G.L.
      Honaker perhaps will publish it even if it's only a PRP.

      Best wishes,

      Andrey
    • Bill Krys
      Hello, 1. take any number, factor it to the primes; e.g.8=2*2*2. 2. calculate the surface area; e.g. 6*(2*2)=24 3. add or subtract 1; e.g. 24-1=23 4. get a
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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        Hello,

        1. take any number, factor it to the primes;
        e.g.8=2*2*2.
        2. calculate the surface area; e.g. 6*(2*2)=24
        3. add or subtract 1; e.g. 24-1=23
        4. get a higher prime than the constituent primes of
        the composite factored.
        5. those primes with only 1 factor must use 1 as the
        other factor. But I also conject that you may use as
        many number 1's as desired and will still get a prime.
        6. if 2-dimensional, then use the perimeter, but may
        also use 1 as many times as like to create any
        n-dimensional figure and surface area +,- will be a
        higher prime than the constituent primes of number
        factored.

        I'm probably suffering, per usual, from looking at too
        small numbers. Could someone find counter examples,
        preferably groups of counter examples. Also can
        someone shed light on surface areas of 4th, 5th etc
        dimensional surface area calculations.

        Thanks,

        Bill
        --- Andrey Kulsha <Andrey_601@...> wrote:
        > Hello!
        >
        > Milton Brown wrote:
        >
        > > Because it would take at least 2 months to
        > > certify, presumably.
        >
        > It isn't the reason. If you find enough curious
        > properties of this number, G.L.
        > Honaker perhaps will publish it even if it's only a
        > PRP.
        >
        > Best wishes,
        >
        > Andrey
        >
        >
        >


        =====
        Bill Krys
        Email: billkrys@...
        Toronto, Canada (currently: Beijing, China)

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      • Bill Krys
        hello, it appears the constant to subtract from the surface area increases as the surface area increases. Bill ===== Bill Krys Email: billkrys@yahoo.com
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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          hello,

          it appears the constant to subtract from the surface
          area increases as the surface area increases.

          Bill

          =====
          Bill Krys
          Email: billkrys@...
          Toronto, Canada (currently: Beijing, China)

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        • Bill Krys
          hello, more primes pop out if one permits a negative sign on the factors and then taking the absolute value after calculating. Bill ... ===== Bill Krys Email:
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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            hello,

            more primes pop out if one permits a negative sign on
            the factors and then taking the absolute value after
            calculating.

            Bill

            --- Bill Krys <billkrys@...> wrote:
            > hello,
            >
            > it appears the constant to subtract from the surface
            > area increases as the surface area increases.
            >
            > Bill
            >
            > =====
            > Bill Krys
            > Email: billkrys@...
            > Toronto, Canada (currently: Beijing, China)
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail
            > http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
            >


            =====
            Bill Krys
            Email: billkrys@...
            Toronto, Canada (currently: Beijing, China)

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            Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail
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          • d.broadhurst@open.ac.uk
            ... I sincerely trust that G.L. will not! I just checked: all of G.L. s entries with more than 1k digits are proven (and all with less digits jolly well
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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              Andrey Kulsha wrote:
              > G.L. Honaker perhaps will publish it even if it's only a PRP.
              I sincerely trust that G.L. will not!
              I just checked: all of G.L.'s entries with
              more than 1k digits are proven
              (and all with less digits jolly well *ought* to be, too!)
              David
            • Andrey Kulsha
              Hello! ... PC_1292: Some weeks ago was The first 1292 digits of 1293^1294 form a PRP PC_141...021: Note that the first 6205 form a titanic probable prime.
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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                Hello!

                David Broadhurst wrote:

                > I just checked: all of G.L.'s entries with
                > more than 1k digits are proven
                > (and all with less digits jolly well *ought* to be, too!)
                > David

                PC_1292: Some weeks ago was "The first 1292 digits of 1293^1294 form a PRP"
                PC_141...021: "Note that the first 6205 form a titanic probable prime."

                I believe that some very fine PRP may be published at PC pages.

                Best wishes,

                Andrey
              • d.broadhurst@open.ac.uk
                ... Yes, I see what you mean, now, Andrey, thanks. We are both right. G.L. does not post merely PrPs at their digital positions, but may refer to them, in
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 2, 2001
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                  Andrey Kulsha wrote:

                  > PC_1292: Some weeks ago was
                  > "The first 1292 digits of 1293^1294 form a PRP"

                  > PC_141...021: "Note that the first 6205 form
                  > a titanic probable prime."

                  Yes, I see what you mean, now, Andrey, thanks.

                  We are both right.

                  G.L. does not post merely PrPs at their "digital"
                  positions, but may refer to them, in passing,
                  by smaller entries.

                  In fact, I see that the second of these PrPs, in
                  http://www.utm.edu/research/primes/curios/141...021.html
                  was communicated by me.
                  But please note that I was meticulous in
                  demoting it to its truly inferior status.

                  David
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