Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [PrimeNumbers] The Function y^2 - x^2

Expand Messages
  • mikeoakes2@aol.com
    ... Of course, I should have done a bit more thinking and less experimentation before posting, as I m sure you have realized by now. If y^2-x^2 = p*q, where y
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 5, 2005
      I wrote:
      >Remarkable!

      Of course, I should have done a bit more thinking and less experimentation
      before posting, as I'm sure you have realized by now.

      If y^2-x^2 = p*q, where y > x >= 0, and p and q are prime, with p >= q,
      then
      y + x = p
      y - x = q
      so
      2*y = p + q
      2*x = p - q

      The first condition is always satisfiable ONLY if Goldbach's conjecture is
      true; and if it is satisfied then the second condition is trivially satisfied.

      Does this answer the question in your original post?

      -Mike Oakes


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jens Kruse Andersen
      ... One snag: y^2-x^2 = (y-x)*(y+x) is a product of 2 primes if and only if (y-x and y+x are both primes) _or_ (y-x=1 and y+x is a product of 2 primes) The
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 5, 2005
        Mike Oakes realized y^2-x^2 = (y-x)(y+x) and wrote:

        > If y^2-x^2 = p*q, where y > x >= 0, and p and q are prime, with p >= q,
        > then
        > y + x = p
        > y - x = q
        > so
        > 2*y = p + q
        > 2*x = p - q
        >
        > The first condition is always satisfiable ONLY if Goldbach's conjecture is
        > true; and if it is satisfied then the second condition is trivially
        > satisfied.

        One snag:
        y^2-x^2 = (y-x)*(y+x) is a product of 2 primes if and only if
        (y-x and y+x are both primes) _or_ (y-x=1 and y+x is a product of 2 primes)

        The second part means x=y-1 is a solution if 2y-1 is a product of 2 primes.
        As example, let y=11. Then 2y-1 = 21 = 3*7, so x=10 is a solution.
        There are of course also Goldbach solutions for y=11.

        This makes our problem slightly weaker than Goldbach's Conjecture, i.e. it is
        conceivable (but highly unlikely) that Goldbach is false but there always is x
        for our problem. That would be the case iff 2y-1 is a product of 2 primes for
        all Goldbach counter examples 2y.

        As to why Goldbach remains unproved?
        Well, lots and lots of conjectures with strong heuristic support are unproved.
        Heuristics are usually useless for proofs.

        A probably weak explanation for why many prime conjectures are hard to prove:
        Primes are defined by a property with multiplication.
        Most conjectures involve addition (or subtraction).
        Connecting these is easy in examples but often hard in proofs.

        --
        Jens Kruse Andersen
      • mikeoakes2@aol.com
        ... primes) which implies the functional equation thinking(Jens) thinking(Mike) -Mike Oakes [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 5, 2005
          >One snag:
          >y^2-x^2 = (y-x)*(y+x) is a product of 2 primes if and only if
          >(y-x and y+x are both primes) _or_ (y-x=1 and y+x is a product of 2
          primes)

          which implies the functional equation
          thinking(Jens) > thinking(Mike)

          -Mike Oakes


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Milton Brown
          Fermat realized this 300 years earlier. And, this is the basis of his factoring algorithm. Milton L. Brown miltbrown at earthlink.net ... conjecture is ...
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 5, 2005
            Fermat realized this 300 years earlier.
            And, this is the basis of his factoring algorithm.

            Milton L. Brown
            miltbrown at earthlink.net

            > [Original Message]
            > From: Jens Kruse Andersen <jens.k.a@...>
            > To: <primenumbers@yahoogroups.com>
            > Date: 2/5/2005 6:52:19 AM
            > Subject: Re: [PrimeNumbers] The Function y^2 - x^2
            >
            >
            > Mike Oakes realized y^2-x^2 = (y-x)(y+x) and wrote:
            >
            > > If y^2-x^2 = p*q, where y > x >= 0, and p and q are prime, with p >= q,
            > > then
            > > y + x = p
            > > y - x = q
            > > so
            > > 2*y = p + q
            > > 2*x = p - q
            > >
            > > The first condition is always satisfiable ONLY if Goldbach's
            conjecture is
            > > true; and if it is satisfied then the second condition is trivially
            > > satisfied.
            >
            > One snag:
            > y^2-x^2 = (y-x)*(y+x) is a product of 2 primes if and only if
            > (y-x and y+x are both primes) _or_ (y-x=1 and y+x is a product of 2
            primes)
            >
            > The second part means x=y-1 is a solution if 2y-1 is a product of 2
            primes.
            > As example, let y=11. Then 2y-1 = 21 = 3*7, so x=10 is a solution.
            > There are of course also Goldbach solutions for y=11.
            >
            > This makes our problem slightly weaker than Goldbach's Conjecture, i.e.
            it is
            > conceivable (but highly unlikely) that Goldbach is false but there always
            is x
            > for our problem. That would be the case iff 2y-1 is a product of 2 primes
            for
            > all Goldbach counter examples 2y.
            >
            > As to why Goldbach remains unproved?
            > Well, lots and lots of conjectures with strong heuristic support are
            unproved.
            > Heuristics are usually useless for proofs.
            >
            > A probably weak explanation for why many prime conjectures are hard to
            prove:
            > Primes are defined by a property with multiplication.
            > Most conjectures involve addition (or subtraction).
            > Connecting these is easy in examples but often hard in proofs.
            >
            > --
            > Jens Kruse Andersen
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Unsubscribe by an email to: primenumbers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > The Prime Pages : http://www.primepages.org/
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.