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Re: [PrimeNumbers] Products

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  • Jud McCranie
    ... There is also 2*5*7. If you have n primes, then there are 2^n products because each of them can be in the product or not. That is counting the empty
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 20, 2004
      At 06:32 PM 10/20/2004, plano9 wrote:

      >My last question {hopefully) for a while. Given a set of prime
      >numbers how do I calculate the number of products that can be formed
      >from that. Ex.
      >{2,3,5,7)
      >2*3
      >2*5
      >2*7
      >3*5
      >3*7
      >5*7
      >2*3*5
      >2*3*7
      >3*5*7
      >2*3*5*7

      There is also 2*5*7.

      If you have n primes, then there are 2^n products because each of them can
      be in the product or not. That is counting the empty product (1) and the
      products of one term. If you omit them then there are 2^n-n-1. (This
      applies to combinations of things, not just a set of primes.)

      >With any luck this might finish the framework for my Twin Primes
      >Conjecture proof...


      Good luck.
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