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RE Pseudoprime question

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  • Jose Ramón Brox
    Yes, it can be. Specifically, the numbers I was talking about in my other email, the Carmichaels, are pseudoprimes for all bases a relatively prime to the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 1 6:04 PM
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      Yes, it can be. Specifically, the numbers I was talking about in my other
      email, the Carmichaels, are pseudoprimes for all bases a relatively prime to
      the Carmichael p. You can only know that it is not prime if you rule over a
      factor of p (p= = 0 (mod a) ).

      First Carmichaels are: 561, 1105, 1729, 2465

      http://primes.utm.edu/glossary/page.php?sort=CarmichaelNumber

      Jose Brox


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Kevin Acres" <research@...>
      To: <primenumbers@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, July 02, 2004 2:28 AM
      Subject: [PrimeNumbers] Pseudoprime question


      > Does anyone know if a number can be pseudoprime in more than one base?
      > Specifically more than one prime base?
      >
      > Is there a proof or example either way?
      >
      > Kevin.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Unsubscribe by an email to: primenumbers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > The Prime Pages : http://www.primepages.org/
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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