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One Pseudofactor sets of primes ending in one [Fwd: SEQ FROM Roger L. Bagula]

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  • Roger Bagula
    I found this method of classification of primes by a pseudofactoring method. I have 12 types : four four each of the end digits {1,3,7,9} of primes without the
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 6, 2004
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      I found this method of classification of primes by a pseudofactoring
      method.
      I have 12 types : four four each of the end digits {1,3,7,9}
      of primes without the {2,5} set.
      Since the multiplication table of the {1,3,7,9} digit set modulo 10 is
      magic square like
      it limits dual factor types to just ten factor types with distinct
      probabilities.
      It was my thought that there might be residue types in a division taken
      modulo ten that were
      distinct. Although the four types per end digit that I found are new,
      they seem to intersect ( aren't unique
      sets whose intersections (and's) would be zero.
      In any case this seems to be a new approach to prime classification as
      none of the subsets
      are in the OEIS.

      -------- Original Message --------
      Subject: SEQ FROM Roger L. Bagula
      Date: Tue, 6 Jan 2004 15:24:00 -0500 (EST)
      From: <njas@...>
      Reply-To: tftn@...
      To: njas@...
      CC: tftn@...



      The following is a copy of the email message that was sent to njas
      containing the sequence you submitted.

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      This copy is just for your records. No reply is expected.
      Subject: NEW SEQUENCE FROM Roger L. Bagula


      %I A000001
      %S A000001 11,101,181,191,271,281,461,541,631,641,811,821,911,991,1091,1171,1181,1361,
      1451,1531,1621,1721,1801,1811,1901,2081,2161,2251,2341,2351,2441,2521,2531,
      2621,2711,2791,2801,2971,3061,3251,3331,3511,3691,3701,3881,4051,4231,4241,
      4421,4591,4691,4861,4871,4951,5051,5231,5501,5581,5591,5851,5861,6121,6131
      %N A000001 One Pseudofactor sets of primes ending in one: 9 lees than 3
      %C A000001 These pseudofactors although not unique sets as their domains seem to overlap
      form twelve subsets of primes based on the first digit set {1,3,7,9} when {2,5}
      are taken away from the prime set. I'm entering the four {1}'s sets.
      There exist {3}'s, {7}'s and {9}'s sets of these same four types.
      %F A000001 a[n]=Primes ending in one
      b(m) = if Mod[a[[n]]/9,10]<3 then a[n]
      %t A000001 digits=4*200
      a=Delete[Union[Table[If[Mod[Prime[n],10]==1, Prime[n],0],{n,1,digits}]],1]
      d2=Dimensions[a][[1]]
      a9l3=Delete[Union[Table[If[Mod[a[[n]]/9,10]<3,a[[n]],0],{n,1,d2}]],1]
      %O A000001 1
      %K A000001 ,nonn,
      %A A000001 Roger L. Bagula (tftn@...), Jan 06 2004
      RH
      RA 209.178.182.100
      RU
      RI



      --
      Respectfully, Roger L. Bagula
      tftn@..., 11759Waterhill Road, Lakeside,Ca 92040-2905,tel: 619-5610814 :
      URL : http://home.earthlink.net/~tftn
      URL : http://victorian.fortunecity.com/carmelita/435/




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