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Re: Decimal point

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  • johndilick
    It looks as if it is reversed from the UK to the USA, as I would interpret the middle dot as a multiplicative identifier, and a baseline dot as a decimal point
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 6, 2003
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      It looks as if it is reversed from the UK to the USA, as I would
      interpret the middle dot as a multiplicative identifier, and a
      baseline dot as a decimal point or a period indicating the end of a
      sentence.

      Money is shown as $1.50 here.

      John Dilick
    • Paul Leyland
      ... This seems to be an entirely silly thread which has essentially nothing to do with prime numbers. However, it s Friday afternoon here in the UK, and
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 6, 2003
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        > It looks as if it is reversed from the UK to the USA, as I would
        > interpret the middle dot as a multiplicative identifier, and a
        > baseline dot as a decimal point or a period indicating the end of a
        > sentence.
        >
        > Money is shown as $1.50 here.

        This seems to be an entirely silly thread which has essentially nothing to do with prime numbers. However, it's Friday afternoon here in the UK, and that's traditionally a time (again, in the UK) for mild silliness. So, for what it's worth, I've always used the convention where a baseline dot represents a decimal point or a full stop ("period" in the US) and the centred ("centered" in the US) dot for a multiplication symbol. As far as I am aware, this convention is widespread in the UK.

        As for money, we also use a baseline dot these days. £1.50 is about $2.49 at the moment or, to remove ambiguity, GBP 1.50 is close to USD 2.49. Back in the good old days, we would write GBP 1.50 as £1/10/0 but that went out of fashion a little over 32 years ago.


        ObPrime: 183, the number typed on some Windows systems to get a centred dot, is prime.


        Paul
      • Ignacio Larrosa Cañestro
        (Friday, June 06, 2003 6:00 PM) ... In order to complete the vision, in Spain actually coexist, in a chaotic situation, the traditional base-line comma and the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 6, 2003
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          (Friday, June 06, 2003 6:00 PM)
          Paul Leyland <pleyland@...> escribió:

          >> It looks as if it is reversed from the UK to the USA, as I would
          >> interpret the middle dot as a multiplicative identifier, and a
          >> baseline dot as a decimal point or a period indicating the end of a
          >> sentence.
          >>
          >> Money is shown as $1.50 here.
          >
          > This seems to be an entirely silly thread which has essentially
          > nothing to do with prime numbers. However, it's Friday afternoon
          > here in the UK, and that's traditionally a time (again, in the UK)
          > for mild silliness. So, for what it's worth, I've always used the
          > convention where a baseline dot represents a decimal point or a full
          > stop ("period" in the US) and the centred ("centered" in the US) dot
          > for a multiplication symbol. As far as I am aware, this convention
          > is widespread in the UK.
          >
          > As for money, we also use a baseline dot these days. £1.50 is about
          > $2.49 at the moment or, to remove ambiguity, GBP 1.50 is close to USD
          > 2.49. Back in the good old days, we would write GBP 1.50 as £1/10/0
          > but that went out of fashion a little over 32 years ago.
          >
          >
          > ObPrime: 183, the number typed on some Windows systems to get a
          > centred dot, is prime.

          In order to complete the vision, in Spain actually coexist, in a chaotic
          situation, the traditional base-line comma and the base-line point, while
          middle point · ([Shift]-[3] in my keyboard, Alt-183 is À, a capital A with
          french grave? accent) is often used for multiplication.

          But in my primmary school (a lot of years ago), I learned to use upper
          comma, writing 2'3 = 23/10 or 3'14 = pi. It is totally old fashioned, but it
          was totally unambigous ...

          OnTopic: Today, in both american an european format, 6062003 is prime ...

          Saludos,

          Ignacio Larrosa Cañestro
          A Coruña (España)
          ilarrosa@...
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