Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Brialliant numbers

Expand Messages
  • Jon Perry
    from; http://www.alpertron.com.ar/BRILLIANT.HTM Is anyone searching for the longest run of consecutive brilliant s? Jon Perry perry@globalnet.co.uk
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      from;

      http://www.alpertron.com.ar/BRILLIANT.HTM

      Is anyone searching for the longest run of consecutive brilliant's?

      Jon Perry
      perry@...
      http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/maths/
      http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/DIVMenu/
      BrainBench MVP for HTML and JavaScript
      http://www.brainbench.com
    • leenstra37
      Uh, consecutive? The only way I can think of to define two brilliant numbers as consecutive is if they were next to each other in a list of PRP s or
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 2, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Uh, consecutive?

        The only way I can think of to define two brilliant numbers as
        consecutive is if they were next to each other in a list of PRP's or
        pseudoprimes.

        (Or perhaps I am just another trolling victim?
        ...excuse me, I need to remove this hook before it gets set too
        firmly... ;-)

        Bruce

        --- In primenumbers@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Perry" <perry@g...> wrote:
        > from;
        >
        > http://www.alpertron.com.ar/BRILLIANT.HTM
        >
        > Is anyone searching for the longest run of consecutive brilliant's?
        >
        > Jon Perry
      • Jon Perry
        Based on the URL mentioned (http://www.alpertron.com.ar/BRILLIANT.HTM), there is a section which states: 1000=10*100=20*50=25*40 1001=11*91=13*77 1002=...
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Based on the URL mentioned (http://www.alpertron.com.ar/BRILLIANT.HTM),
          there is a section which states:

          1000=10*100=20*50=25*40
          1001=11*91=13*77
          1002=...
          1003=17*59
          1004=...
          1005=15*67
          1006=...
          1007=19*53
          1008=12*84=14*72=16*63=18*56=21*48=24*42=28*36
          1009=...
          1010=101*10
          1011=...
          1012=11*92=22*46=23*44
          1013=...
          1014=13*78=26*39
          1015=39*35
          1016=...

          and so 1001-1007 are 'consecutive' and all brilliant. Except for this is
          confusing as 15 really equals 3*5. Is this sort of data really necessary?

          Continuing, it seems 1003 and 1007 are 2-brilliant, and thus can we define
          'consecutive' from this? Note that if 1009 was 3-brilliant, then this would
          be OK.

          Jon Perry
          perry@...
          http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/maths/
          http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/DIVMenu/
          BrainBench MVP for HTML and JavaScript
          http://www.brainbench.com
        • Jon Perry
          Think about divisibilty by three. Please. Regions [x,x+k] where the density of brilliant numbers is larger than normal. Jon Perry perry@globalnet.co.uk
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            'Think about divisibilty by three. Please.'

            Regions [x,x+k] where the density of brilliant numbers is larger than
            normal.

            Jon Perry
            perry@...
            http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/maths/
            http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~perry/DIVMenu/
            BrainBench MVP for HTML and JavaScript
            http://www.brainbench.com
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.