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25583Fw: (the trouble i am finding, solvers are using one equation instead of four...

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  • amel dalluge
    Jul 20 9:21 AM
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      --- On Sun, 7/20/14, amel dalluge <youngpoohter@...> wrote:

      > From: amel dalluge <youngpoohter@...>
      > Subject: (reply to) Re: [PrimeNumbers] Pairs of Odd Numbers and Prime Number Consequences
      > To: "w_sindelar@..." <w_sindelar@...>
      > Date: Sunday, July 20, 2014, 9:17 AM
      >      the trouble
      > i am finding that all prime numder solvers have is that any
      > tangible solution has to be four seperate equations (not
      > one).
      >      the reason being that there is four
      > seperate unique waves created that repeat at a growth of ten
      > to each wave (see my post to the group and, note, it got
      > messed up during the emailing [the waves aren't perfect]).
      >      the trick is to determine the
      > initial starting point of each wave, coordinate the next
      > point which will be, starting at one, a growth of plus two
      > (1,3,5,7,9,11,13...) times the value of the initial point of
      > the wave, repeat for next point (one times the value of the
      > initial point would be the start, and than, three times the
      > value of the initial point would be the second point in the
      > wave and, five times the value of the initial point would be
      > the third point in the wave, so on and so forth).
      >       also note, the waves' wave will also
      > repeat at a growth of ten times the value of the initial
      > point plus the value of the prior point.
      >       as i said above,what i am finding is
      > prime solvers are using one equation instead of four as
      > required for a tangible solution as i above laid out above
      > (just not in symbols but in layman's terms)[ that's the
      > solution to all prime numbers, yes above].
      > --------------------------------------------
      > On Sun, 7/20/14, 'w_sindelar@...'
      > w_sindelar@...
      > [primenumbers] <primenumbers-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
      > wrote:
      >
      > Subject: [PrimeNumbers] Pairs of Odd Numbers and Prime
      > Number Consequences
      > To: primenumbers@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Sunday, July 20, 2014, 7:11 AM
      >
      >
      >
      > One, For all pairs of odd positive primes A<B with the
      > same difference D and A>3, the number N of even
      > integers
      > between A and B that are divisible by a twin prime middle
      > number remains the same, and equals D/3, if D mod 3 equals
      > 0, or equals (D-1)/3, if D mod 3 equals 1, or equals
      > (D+1)/3, if D mod 3 equals 2.
      >
      > I found statement one to be true for many (A, B) prime
      > pairs.
      >
      > I also found the following generalized statement two to be
      > true for many non-prime odd integers.
      >
      > Two, For all pairs of odd positive integers A<B, that
      > satisfy these 4 requirements:
      >
      > a), Their greatest common divisor equals 1.
      >
      > b), They are not divisible by 3.
      >
      > c), They are not prime
      >
      > d), They have the same difference D.
      >
      > the number N of even integers between A and B that are
      > divisible by a twin prime middle number remains the same,
      > and equals D/3, if D mod 3 equals 0, or equals (D-1)/3, if
      > D
      > mod 3 equals 1, or equals (D+1)/3, if D mod 3 equals 2.
      >
      > Statement one example: Pick D=22. The first occurrence of
      > a
      > pair of primes with a difference D=22 is A=7 and B=29. The
      > number N of even integers between A and B that are
      > divisible
      > by a twin prime middle number is N=7 by actual count.
      > Since
      > (D mod 3) equals 1, (D-1)/3=7 which agrees with the actual
      > count N. Take the consecutive primes A=1129 and B=1151.
      > D=22. Again N equals 7, and remains constant for all pairs
      > of odd primes with the same difference D=22.
      >
      > Statement two example: Again pick D=22. The first
      > occurrence
      > of a pair of odd integers with a difference of 22 that
      > satisfies the 4 requirements is A=133 and B=155. Again
      > N==7.
      > prompting the following statement three.
      >
      > For convenience, let’s call any pair of distinct odd
      > primes a “P”, and any pair of distinct odd positive
      > integers that satisfies the 4 requirements a “Z”.
      >
      > Three, if a P and a Z have the same difference D, then the
      > number Np of even integers in P that are divisible by a
      > twin
      > prime middle number always equals the number Nz of even
      > integers in Z that are divisible by a twin prime middle
      > number.
      >
      > Is all of the above obvious and well known? Anyone care
      > try
      > these exercises and check me on this? Thanks folks.
      >
      > Bill Sindelar   
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > .
      >
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